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MAMU 

19U6-47 
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Public Document 



No, 2 



THE COMMONWEALTH IP MASSACHUSETTS,' 



rC^J 



ANNUAL REPORT 
Off THE 
DEPARTMENT 1 EDUCATION 

YEAH ENDING JUNE 30, I9U7 



ISSUED IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 2 0? CHAPTER 69 
OE THE GENERAL LAWS 



PART X 




■ , - , • • » 1 • • 4 >*_• 
> 1 m 






^■^■■i^HH 






379,7_K3 



Uftabers of Board of Sdneatioa, Casnissioner of Education, etc. . . . 
Forosr sanbcrs, secretaries and eomlasioaers Of Board of Bducs-tion. , 
Annual Beports of 

Board of Sducutlon 

Cazsds&iener ....... .................. 

Board of Collegiate /uititority * . 

B&aeatloaal legislation, research, and statistics ...... 

Division ef ataaeatary and Secondary Sdoe&tloa and State 

Teachers Co lle g e* ....•••.••..*•• 

state fl * aehor * College* ....»..•••.... 

Secondary is&ue&tioft 

momentary Bduoation 

Special Schools and Classes ........ 

Physical fl gn oat lon ...«••.••... 

Teacher Plaeeaent ............. 

Music Stoc- vtioa 

Regional Veterans JJducatlon Centers .... 

Scholarship* • Children of Deceased tar Veteran* 

s&visloa of Imigratioa and saericanisatloa ......... 

Division ef the Blind ........••••....«•«• 

Blvision of Facile Lioreries 

Massachusetts Marl tine Aoadesy 

Bradford Darfee Technical Institute 

Xosell Textile Institute ............. 

Sew Bedford Textile Institute 

Division of Vocational .education 

Division of Vee^tioaal aehabilitatioa , 

division of University Extension .............. 

financial Statement 

Statistic* 

State Teacher* Colleges • . 

Stgwrlntendeney ttalons 

iSlgb school Sduectien In Terms of Less than 500 fenUies . . 

Transportation to Public and Private School* 

Certification of Teacher* in state-Alded High Schools .... 

Transportation of Children Living on Islands 

Cowity Training Schools and State Institution* 

general Sehool Toad, Fart* 1 end XI 

Vocational Education 

Bester of Statc-Mded Vocational Schools (Table l) . . . 

Sejssttrlaed ?inanolal Statement (table 3) 

Sarnings of Vocational Agricultural Pupils, sto. (Table 5) 

Vital Statistics by Types of Schools (Table 6) 

Use ef federal ftnds, Snlth-Hughes and Qeorge-Sarden 

(Table 7) 

Statistic* of Teacher-Training (Table S) 

Begistratlon and 3q>loynent ef Minors Ik to 16 Tears of 
aft* (Table 9) 



10-12 

13 -W 
19 

20 

21 - 2j 

gf.*fi 

03-45 

H6-50 
52. -53 

56-56 

W , 
60-62 

63. 9* 



6T 



66- 



87-89 
90, 9X 
92 - 101 
102, 303 
10h 

105 - 1& 
165 - 186 
I87 - 19U 

195 

196 
197 - 20s 

209-219 

220 

221 

222 

222, 223 

22k 




2U3 - 25O 
251-253 

25*. 255 



J. BBSHOBB, JH., Commissioner of Education 
lAf&OBB A. Tl$2M$U&D t Beputy Commissioner of S&uftation 

Advisory Board 
Six Officio The Goanisaioner of ^donation. Chairman 



Term %tplx*» 
19^7. Alexander Bria, 2§1 Causeway Street, Boston 

19U7. Baaerof t Beatley, Simmons College, Boston 

19li8. Graft* Agnes Buston, 8 Baviland Street, Worcester 

I9U8. Salter I 1 . Bo^aey, Singlish High School, Boston 

19U9. John J. Walsh, 1 Court Street* Boston 

191$. Bath C Bediean, 22 Hovilaad st root, Worcester 

Alfred 2111s, Jr. t 351 Tresoat Street, Boston* 



BOARB Of COXLUGZAXS AUTittaiTT 

Sac Officio The Commissioner of iidocatioa, Chairman 

BAIXBL H. S3AY, Agent 

Tem Expires 
I3H7. Bancroft Beatley, Simmons College, Beaton 

19^7. Alexander Bria, 251 Causeway Street, Boston 

19U7. Claale U. Fuasa, Phillips Academy, Andover 

19U7. Bow. J.B.N. Maxwell, S.J., Craawell Preparatory 

School, 2*nox 
19*$. Grace Agnes Boston, 6 Haariland Street, Worcester 

19U6. Walter *. Bewnoy, i-Jagliah High School, Boston 

19*19. Jcbn J. Walsh, 1 Court Street, Boston 

19^9. Bnth C. Bediean, 22 fia-rilani Street, Worcester 

1951, Catherine A. Byrnes, lUU Washington Bead, 

Springfield 
1951. l*c C. Donahue, 106 Sooner Street, Sonerrille 

HAS3ACH0BBTTS BOABJ) JOB SSB FBOKOTIOH Of QPPOBSTKWISS FOR YOUHO 

mm 

2x Officio John J. Desmond, Jr., Comnissloner of Bduaation, 

Chairman 
Bx Officio J. Paul Boyle, Oenmieeioaer of Correction 
rix Officio Jans a T. Morlarty, Commissioner of Labor and Industries 
•he Officio Patrick A. fosspkins, Coumissloner of Public Welfare 



* - Representing labor on State Board for Vocational Sdaoatlon 
(C. 531. Acts of 19U1). 



**S*" 



Tena Aspires 

1<&6. Daniel J. Seggin, 2$ Gamer Bead, Dorchester 

19^7. Harry H. Kerr, 355 Highland Avenue, Wollaston 

19^7 • Helen K, Toorhees, Mi. Ho3yofc@ College, $0. Hadley 

2§Hf. Mary H. Tolaan, 26k Boylston Street, Boston 

1947. Shomae H. MeOoean, 66 Bedford Bead, Wetrora 

Warren £• Benson, .Agent and Supervisor of Guidance 

and Placement 
Seorge H. Varaey, Business Agent 



BI7I5IUH Of 23^Bl^AHr Alii} SSCC8IBABX kkjcasioii arb s^ases qabhsbs 

CGU&G33S 

FAffaKK J. SULUVAH, Director 

supssarisoRS 

Alice B. Seal. Supervisor of jaeaentaxy Mueatien 

HiilJp a. Casbsan, Supervisor of Beglosal Veterans 1 Sducatioa Center 

Bslph B. Colaon, Assistant Supervisor of Physical Muaatien 

Inn M. Curley, Supervisor of %sc1g1 Schools and Glasses 

Daniel J. Solly, Supervisor of Hsysical Idaeation and Safety 

lilHWltiHW 
A. Bnssell Mack, Supervisor of Secondary Mucatloa 
Martina McDonald BriseoU, Supervisor of Music 

A. Ffcelan, supervisor of feacher Flacenent 



vmttmm & stabe *bachbr3 coLusags mm thb massaghoskws scbool 

0? ASS 

John J. K»XLy t Bridgeeater Janes Dugan, Lowell 

ViUien J. Sanders, Fitchburg Grover C. Bownan, North Adase 

Martin F, O'Connor, Sraningfaaa iidward A, Sullivan, Sales 

, Uramis* Mdvard J. scanlon, Westfleld 

Sugene A. Sullivan, Worcester 

Cordon L. Beynolds, Massachusetts School of Art, 
Boston 



DI7ISIQH OF T0CA7X0SAL SSOQAfflOf 
M, HOBCBOSS SZBAXSOH, Director 
Daniel H. Shay, Assistant Director 



Subdivision of Supervision 



• - 



Operation temporarily suspended. 



-3* 



John &. Olavin, Field of Agricultural Schools and Departments 
£eslis J. Haitian Assistant, Field of Industrial Spools for Boys 
Frank I». Allen, Held of Foc&tioa&l Art Sdueatioa in ladustry 

and Business 
Caroline H. Wilaoa, fields of Industrial Schools, Household Arts 

Schools sad Bepartaeate, sad Goatlaaation Schools for Girls 



Clave 1. salsa, Assistant, field of Household Arts Schools sad 

Harold 1. Shapiro, field of Distributive Occupational Sdueatioa 

Subdivision of $eacher-?ralniag 

It, Soreross Stratton, Director, Teacher-ftaialag 

Jesse A. faft, field of Agricultural Schools sad Bepartoenta 

(Bssideat, 203 StocKbridge Hall, Massachusetts State College, 
Jnaerst) 
Charles f , Oliver, Fart-tine Assistaat, field of Agricultural 
Schools end Bspartaents (Bssideat, 219 Stodtbrldge Sail, 
Massachusetts State College, Amherst) 
Shoaas L. Flyan, field of Industrial Schools for Beys aad Men 
John f . Shea, field of Industrial Schools for Bore and Men 
William J, McCoaaell, Assistaat, Held of Industrial Schools for 

acys aaa aea 
John I. task, field of General Tee&tioaal aad Coatiauatioa Schools 

for Boys 
Anoe 4. Kloss, fields of Industrial Schools, Household Arts 

Schools and Departments, and Continuation Schools for Girls 

aad Wotaea 
Martha 9, Wesson, Assistaat , Field of leasehold Arts Schools 

and Departments 
Lou Lombard, Assistaat, field of Household Arts (Bssideat. 

fraalnghan State feaohere College) 

Sabdivislon of Occupational Informatloa, Vocational Counseling, 

Surrey aad Placement 

Joseph A. Bedard, field of Occupational Iafonaatioa and Vocational 

Counseling 
Bttictl f • Melaa, field of Survey aad Placement 

Subdivision of Adaialstratloa 

Carl X. Herriek, All fields Francis J. leaver*. Assistant 

Subdivision of Private Trade Schools 

Joha f , Weetrel, Supervisor 






Subdivision of In-Service fr&ining for Veterans 

M. Horcross 3t rat ton, Director 

Daniel H* Shay, Assistant Director in Charge 

Lsalie J. Sotting, Assistant 

H. Porter Perkins, Supervisor 

J. Edward Sharkey, Supervisor 

John 3. Butler, Assistant Supervisor 

William J. Butler, Aosi stent Supervisor 

tfilliani 0. Cressford, Assistant 3t^BerViser 

Francis J. ;?axreakopf , Assistant Supervisor 

ffaooas F. Qldf leld, Assistant Supervisor 

Charles J. Sheehan* Assistant Supervisor 



assert F. Solan, Supervisor 

Jaaes 1. Burke, Assistant Supervisor 



Veterans' Counseling 

barren 1. Benson, Supervisor 
Janes P. Gnthaak, Supervisor 
Joseph A. Bedard, Part-time Supervisor 



BIVISIGH OF V0CA2IQ8AL BSHABILITAS'IOS 

HBHBSBS A, DALLAS, Director 

S&vard D, Callahan, Supervisor 

Henry liaia, Supervisor 

Anthony A. Bosse, Supervisor 

Louis M. Traey, Supervisor 

Bobert C. Cochrane, K.D,, Medical Consultant 

Mrs. Dorothy A. Gates, Supervisor of Physical 

Bestoration 
John S. Burns, Assistant 
Charles A. Campbell, Assistant 
John J. Cuaoalngs, Jr.* Assistant 
Sheaas F. Donnellan, Assistant 
Bsthsr L. Frutkoff, Assistant 
Frederick ». Greehan, Jr., Assistant 
M. Monica Kins, Assistant 
•Tilliasi 2. Sing, Assistant 
John S. Levis, Assistant 
Katharine KacLarnie, Assistant 
Ceorge L, O'Brien, Assistant 
Step sen L. Sadler, Assistant 
2m*st A. aeift, Assistant 
Oeorge P. Shelton, Assistant 
Wendell J. White, Assistant 



3. MMMB CUM., Director 

SUen Htapatriefe, Supervisor in a&aaation 

Ifctlen B, (karrity* Supervisor in Jgftneation 

iter/ 2*. G-uytoa, Sdperriaor of Malt Civic j^Laestion 

Otto Eieaaliag, Supervisor in £&ucntlon 

Jofea P. Mefimil, Supervisor in M\**ation 

Leo ?.A. Hornby, Assistant Sws>ervi3or i» B&ieation 

Ursula S. ^easey* Assistant So&ervisor in Macatlon 

BITISKH 0? XittX6BA£tQH A!B ABESXaMttaWKai 

SJenibera of /dvisory Board 

T«ra iijsjsiree 

19^7. Mr*. S*» Whiting ifhite, Boston, Chsirjiea 

194} • Mr*. Agnes 1. IlpQheek, BmntrVLUt 

1914$. Silfred J. roirler, Sail Hiver 

19*$. Mrs. Clementina Laagons, Boston 

19^9. Charles Sepucha, Sale© 

19*19. Joseph Botelho, Sow Bedford 

Alio* V, 0* Connor, Sc^erviaor of Social Service 
Daniel J. Donahue, District Agent (Sail Hirer) 
Charlea P. Martin, Blatrict Agent (Lawrence) 
John A. Mclnnea, Bft strict Agent (Springfield) 
Charlea I*. Carey, District Agent (Worcester) 

BXrXSXQH 0? TH3 BLUB 

AB5RTJBP. 3ULUTAU, Director 

Adrtaory Board 

9em Sapires 

19U7. Mabel C. Courtney, Woreostor 

19*18. Hooert H. aalloeell, Bedhan 

I9M9. Llneood Drskine, VToreeater 

3^50. Anne 0. Ilnberg, ffahan 

1951. ftoaaa J. Itorriaon, Springfield 



6 



Monttiem of Staff 



John J. Buckley, anployaent 

Anns Burke, Belief 

Beset ta M. Cosloa, /^cooeitaat 

Mith 2. Srria, Sg^loyiaeat 

3MS»1 M. Frederick, Belief 

Janet l«. Gordon, Medical social Worker 

frauds 2. larardi, Itelief 

Helen 2. Jowders, Work for Children 

Frances Lakin, Histories and Baoorda 

Theodore 0. Louts, Census 

Robert J. McCarthy, Talking Book* 

Joseph 5. Phelps, Belief 

Ocrtru&e M. Sullivan, Belief 

Boae 3. Trainer, Sales Promoter 

Peal J. Trainer, Talking Book* 

frod 7. Walsh, Belief 

Louise 0. Wright, aaployaent 



Blind Handicraft Shops 



v/ork shops: 



73 Keabury Street, Boston 

Florence 1. Cueadngs, Manager 

36 Xeasdowne Street, Cambridge 

Xhoaas Mahar, Manager 
fylB Second Street, Fall Biver 

Joseph Bennis, Manager 
323 Middlesex Street, Lowell 

Albert Ctagnon, Manager 
36 Sagle Street, Pittsf ield 

Irvin 7. Bossl, Manager 
33 Highland Street, Worcester 

.Sdward Curran, Manager 



Woolsen House Indus tries: hg 



Inaan Street, CaaDridge 
Catherine Keenan, Manager 



DIVISION OF PIBLIC LXBl&SXKS 
Board of Cosmissloners 



Tens Xxplroe 

19**. 
19**. 

1950. 
1951. 



Stacy B. Southworth, Braintree, Chairman 
Richard J. Sullivan, Lawrence 
Mrs. Basar d 7. Turner, Wetertown 
St. Bar. Magr. Hugh 7. Blunt, Cambridge 
Mrs. Douglas Horton, vfellesley 
Catharine M. Term, Library Advleer 

7. Generieve Bo i eclair, Oeneral Secretary 
Sarah A. Beard, Coneultant, School Libraries and 
Librtry tfork with Children end Toung People 



-7- 



CL&TTGM L. LUSf , Secretary 

libbers of the Board 

&t Officio JO^I J. 1S5SMOH1), Jr., Ceffloiasioaer of Sduc&tioa 

Term Ss&ires 

X9hg. Harry StealXey, Pall Blvw 

19*9. Mildred 8, Joaks, Springfield 



MASSACHUSETTS fff flW COLX&dB, JUgHSBSf 

HOBS P. BAF^R President 

Trustees 

Six Officio His iaeceXXency, Bobert P, Bradford 
3jc Officio John J, Besaond, Jr., Ooasaitiiontr of .^duaation 
§r Officio Frederick B. Cole, CoasBissioaer of Agriculture 
2x Officio Hugh P. Baker, President of the College 

3£&7. Horry Bonlap Brosa, BiXlerica 

19^7. John W. Salvia, Greenfield 

X9US. Joseph W. Bartlett, Kevten 

ISW. Philip P. mxiteorc, Soaderland 

19U9. Freak L. Boyden, DeerfieXd 

X9**9. Uehard Saitoaatall, Sherbora 

1950. Braeat Keftyser, WeHesley 

1990* Alden 0. Brett , BeXoont 

195X. Leonard Caraieheel, Medford 

X95X. Mrs. Elisabeth L. McBanara, Casftridge 

1952. Mrs. Joseph Seen Leach, Welpole 

X952. Belph P. Saber, lest Hewton 

X953. John «. DeeXy, Lee 

19^3* Clifford C. Hubbard, Mansfield 

Officers of the trustees 

His fixeeXXenoy Hobert P. Bradford, President 
Joseph W. Bartlett, (Thai man 
Janea *. Burke, Secretary, iiraherst 
Bebert D. HawXey. Treaeurer, Aaherst 



zrnmm smm -whkioal ix&mm, fall ansa 

LSSLH 1. OOCKBS, Principal 

Trustees 

ibc Officio His Honor, William P. Grant, Mayor 

It Officio John J. Beenend, Jr. » CoBBaissionsr of Sduc&tlon 

£x Officio Willlan S. Lynch* Superintendent of Sehoole 

1946. John S. Brayton, President, fall after 
19^7. Jaoes faasey, Tiee-President, Fall Biver 
19^9. 3e»ard P. Zioolan, CXstlc, Fall River 
19 2 *?. John A* Graadfield, Soiaereet 

19H7. fttlard W. KcLsod, fell Hive* 

19^7. Sosaaa P. Ihcspson, Fall River 

1947. Madison P. Welsh, Fall River 
19US. Mrs. Francis J # Connors, Fall Rive* 
l$ljS. Joseph P. Gilligaa* Fall saver 
19H8. Mrs. Grace a. agree. Tall River 

1948. Antonio M. Fires, fall River 
19U9. Henry J. Dion, Swansea 
19*19. Jan Fletraasek, Fall River 
19*@. Roland 3orel» Fall River 
19M9. Joseph Monis, Fall River 

lowell tsxsils ixmmm t lqwsll 

£HUUtSU a. FOX, Fresident 

Trustees 

2x Offieio, Bis Honor, Leo A, Hoy, Mayor 

2x Officio, John J. Dosaond, Jr.* Coanaissloner of iHdueatlon 

Tern Jfaepiws 

19U7. John J. Molloy, Lowell 

19^7 • Myron S. Freenan, Worcester 

19U7. Harold W. Lslteh, Andover 

19^7. Francis F. Uadden, Wlnthrop 

19^7. Melville Weston, Worth Aodover 

191(6. Frank f . Oalney, Lawrenoe 

19U6, Stephen H. Glcason, Ghelnsford 

19I4S. Ssarael PinnnaVi, Brookllne 

19U8. Philip L. So&nnell, Lowell 

1948. J. anile Lsairs, Lowell 

1949. John A. Calnin, Lowell 
19^9. Geor* B. Dosols, LoweU 
194§. William A. Donovan, Lowell 
1948. Barnett D. Gordon, arookllne 
I9U9. X. Perkins McOulrs, Boston 



-9- 

159 MBSQ2® WSStlS HS$t$U£E, HSS BEDFORD 

&SOam VUUCOU Principal 

MAUD L. CLAHE, freasyrer 

Trustees 

Sk Officio His H&nor, Arthur B. Herriaan, Mayor 

Jte Officio John J. Beaaend, Jr., Coaniseianer of Sdueation 

£s Officio W. Sanneth Bu«ka, Superintendent of Schools 

$em fi^pivea 

19^7. TfiUiaa B. fargaaoa. Ma* Bedford 

19^7. Walter H. Paige, Saw Bedford 

W. John Began, JJew Bedford 

19U7. Frederick Bollinaon, Sew Bedford 

19^7, WUllan A. Shoagpeon, Sew Bedford 

19J18. Jaraea Mania, Hew Bedford 

l#*g. Kil* 7. Baleen, Winthrop 

19W. William B. King, Sew Bedford 

19*18. George Sargent, Sew Bedford 

194S. John P. shea. Sew Bedford 

19^9. leareat JtaoJbeux, Hew Bedford 

19&9. Jane* J, Eanaedy, Sew Bedford 

19U9. Haynond E. KeBvoy, Stoughton 

19*#. Williaa Bioharda, Sew Bedford 

V$Q. John Verteate* Jr., Saw Bedford 

HASSACfiUBSffFS UABHIMS ACABWT 

Capt. V, Patoar Harrington, Secretary 
Capt. Howard a. Copeland, USSB, Superintendent, 
Shore Baaa, I^rannla 

Board of Conasieeionera 

feaa Sapiree 

19^. fteodore !•• Storer, Cambridge, Chairman 

19H7. «fohn W. Oowna, ffinehecter 

19U9. Cant. Oharlaa H. Hurley, Sewtan Centre 



FORMER MSS4BERS OF xHE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
OR THS ADVISORY BOARD 



Original Members - 1837 



Jama a G. Garter 
Emerson Davis 
Edmund Dwlght 
Horace Mann 



Edward A. Hew ton 
Robert Rantoul, Jr« 
Ehomas Robbins 
Jared Sparks 



Appointed Since 



George Putnam 
Charles Hudson 
George H. Briggs 
William G. Ba.es 
John *• James 
ivlisha Bar tie tt 
Reman Humphrey 
Stephen C. Phillips 
Barnes Sears 
Edwin H. Chap In 
Henry B. Hooker 
Stephen P# Webb 
Thomas Kinnicutt 
Joseph Vi. Ingraham 
John A* Bolls s 
George B. Emerson 
Charles K. True 
tfark Hopkins 
Edward Ocheraan 
Isaac Davis 
Alexander H. Vinton 
George S. Boutwell 
Henry Wheatland 
Hosea Ballou 
Arisl Parish 
Cornelius 0« Felton 
Alonzo II. iuint 
A ill lam A. Stearns 
Russsll Tomllnson 
hrasLus 0. Haven 
David H. Mason 
John ?• Marshall 
Emory ftashbnrn 
Abner J. fhipps 
Jamas Freeman Clarke 
William Rice 



John D. Philbrick 
Samuel T. See lye 
George T. Wilde 
Gardiner G. Hubbard 
Alonzo A. Miner 
Henry Chap in 
Constantino 0. Esty 
Edward B. Gillett 
Phillips Brooks 
Christopher C. Husaey 
Charles B. Rice 
Elijah B. Stoddard 
Horatio G. Knight 
Abby W. Hay 

Charles Francis Adams, Jr. 
Hilton B. Whitney 
Thomas Wentworth Hig^lnson 
Admiral P. Stone 
Francis A. Walker 
Edward C. Carrigan 
Horace E. Scudder 

liner H. Capen 
Kate Gannett Wells 
Alice Freeman Palmer 
George I. Aldrich 
George H. Jonley 
Joel D. Wilier 
Franklin Carter 
Clinton Q. Richmond 
Caroline Hazard 
Albert E. Vtinship 
Ihomas B. Pitzpaurick 
Frederick P. Fish 
Sarah Louise Arnold 
Simeon 3. Chase 
Levi L. Conant 



\\ 



Frederick ■« Hamilton 
Paul H. Hanus 
Jeremiah E. Burke 
James Chalmers 
Margaret flattery 
Samuel L. Powers 
Michael J. Downey 
George fi« wrenn 
Arthur K. Lowe 
Ella Lyman Cabot 
Grace S. Mansfield 
Henry l>. Sawyer 



Walter V. HoDuffee 

Lincoln Filene 

ESary E. Murray 

P. A. QiConnell 

Roger L. Putnam 

Thomas H. Sullivan 

Anna ■» Power 

Kaxhryn A* Doyle 

Ada L. Corns bock 

Dr. Francis T. Spaulding 

Flora Lane 



Ex-Officile - Governors 



Edward Everett 
Marcus Morton 
John Davis 
George K. Briggs 
George S. Houtwell 
John H. Clifford 
inaorj Washburn 
Henry J. Gardner 
Nathaniel r. Banks 
John A. Andrew 
Alexander H. Bullock 
wiilism Glaflln 
William B. Washburn 
William Gascon 
Alexander H. Rice 
Thomas Talbot 
John D. Long 



Benjamin F. Butler 
George D. Robinson 
Gliver Ames 
John *. A. bracks tt 
William It Russell 
Frederic T, Greenhalge 
Roger Woloott 
W. ;urray Crane 
John L. Bauea 
William L. Douglas 
Curtis Guild, Jr. 
iiften S. Draper 
Eugene N. loss 
David I. Walsh 
Samuel U. KcCall 
Calvin Coolidge 



Sx-Officlis - Lieutenant-Governors 



George Hull 
Henry H. Child* 
John Reed 
Henry ¥• Cusbman 
Ellsha Huntington 
William C. Plunkett 
Simon irown 
Henry W. Benchley 
Ellphalet Trask 
John Z. Goodrich 
John Nesuil th 
Joel Hayden 



William Claflin 
Joseph Tucker 
Thomas Talbot 
Horatio u. Knight 
Byron Weston 
Oliver Ames 
William H. Halle 
Louis A. Fro thing haa 
Robs re Luce 
Edward P. Barry 
oraf ton L. Gushing 
Channlng H. Cox 



Secretaries of the Board 



1837-1843 Horace Mann 
1849-1855 Bamas Sears 
1856-1860 George S. Boutwell 
1861-1876 Joseph White 



1877-1893 John W. Dickinson 
1894-1902 Frank A. Hill 
1903-1904 C. B* Xlllinghast 
1904-1915 George H. Martin 



Coamis si oners of Education 



1909-1915 David Sneddon 
1916-1935 Parson Smith 
1935-1939 James 6. Reardon 



1939-1943 Walter F* Downey 

1943-1946 Julius Warren 

1946- John J. Destaond, Jr. 



13 






ESPOII OP THE 



BOARD OP EDUCATION 



(TO COME) 



4 



* 



I 



[Chap. 652] 

An Act establishing a board of education which shall 
have supervision and control of the department of 
education. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter 15 of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section 1, as appearing in the Ter- 
centenary Edition, and inserting in place thereof the follow- 
ing section: — Section 1. There shall be a department of 
education, in this chapter called the department, which shall 
be under the supervision and control of a board of educa- 
tion, in sections one A to six B, inclusive, called the board. 

Section 2. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended by 
inserting after section 1, as amended, the three following 
sections : — Section 1A . There shall be in the department 
a board consisting of nine members appointed by the gov- 
ernor with the advice and consent of the council. Upon the 
expiration of the term of office of a member of the board, his 
successor shall be appointed by the governor, with the ad- 
vice and consent of the council, for a term of nine years. 
The board shall elect one of its own members as chairman. 
The board shall meet at least once a month, except during 
July and August, and at such other times as it may deter- 
mine by rule and when requested by any five members. The 
members of the board shall serve without compensation, 
but shall be reimbursed for then actual necessary expenses 
incurred in the performance of their duties. 

Section IB. The board shall appoint a commissioner of 
education, in this chapter called the commissioner, for a 
term of five years, and may remove him. He shall receive 
such salary, not exceeding eleven thousand dollars, as the 
board may determine. 

Section 1C. The commissioner shall appoint and may 
remove a deputy commissioner, who shall perform such duties 
as may be assigned to him by the commissioner. 

Section 3. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 3A, inserted by section 1 of chapter 
549 of the acts of 1943, and inserting in place thereof the 
following section : — Section 3A. There shall be in the de- 
partment a board of collegiate authority, consisting of the 
commissioner, who shall be chairman, the members of the 
board of education, and four citizens of the commonwealth 
to be appointed by the governor, with the advice and con- 
sent of the council, for terms of four years each. Of the ap- 
pointive members of said board, at least one shall represent 
colleges and universities, one shall represent junior colleges, 



and one shall represent the secondary school system of the 
public schools of the commonwealth. The members of said 
board of collegiate authority shall serve without compensa- 
tion, but shall be reimbursed for their necessary expenses 
actually incurred in the performance of their duties. 

Section 4. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended by 
striking out section 4, as most recently amended by section 2 
of chapter 344 of the acts of the current year, and inserting in 
place thereof the following section: — Section 4- Under the 
direction of the board of education, the commissioner shall 
be the executive and administrative head of the department. 
He shall have charge of the administration and enforcement 
of all laws, rules and regulations which it is the duty of the 
department to administer and enforce. In the department 
there shall be a division of public libraries, a division of im- 
migration and Americanization, a division of the blind, and 
such other divisions as the board may determine. The com- 
missioner shall make such recommendations to the board 
relative to the formation of new divisions in the department 
as he deems advisable. Each division, except the division 
of immigration and Americanization, shall be in charge of a 
director, and each division shall be under the general super- 
vision of the commissioner. Nothing in this chapter shall be 
construed as affecting the powers and duties of the trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts as set forth in chapter 
seventy-five. 

Section 5. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 5, as amended by section 9 of chap- 
ter 596 of the acts of 1941, and inserting in place thereof the 
following section: — Section 5. Except as otherwise pro- 
vided in this chapter, the directors of divisions of the de- 
partment shall be appointed and may be removed by the 
board. Except in the case of the teachers' retirement board, 
the division of public libraries, the division of the blind and 
institutions under the department, the board may appoint 
such assistants as the work of the department may require, 
may assign them to divisions, transfer and remove them, but 
none of such employees while employed in the department 
shall have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest in the 
publication or sale of any text or school book, or article of 
school supply used in the public schools of the common- 
wealth. For the compensation of such assistants as it may 
employ, for conferences and conventions of teachers held 
under the direction of the department, and for traveling and 
other necessary expenses incurred by the members and sub- 
ordinates, the department may be allowed such sums as may 
be appropriated. The commissioner shall recommend to the 
board directors of divisions and such assistants as in his 
opinion the work of the department may require, and, when 
in his opinion it is necessary, their removal; and he shall 
recommend to the board the assignment of assistants to 
divisions or their transfer when, in his opinion, it is necessary. 

Chap. 662. page 2. 



Section 6. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 6, as appearing in the Tercentenary 
Edition, and inserting in place thereof the following section: 
— Section 6. The board, with the advice of the commis- 
sioner, may appoint and define the functions of a state ad- 
visory council and local advisory councils in connection with 
university extension and correspondence courses, and, sub- 
ject to section ten A of chapter eight, may rent suitable 
offices. 

Section 7. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 6A, as most recently amended by sec- 
tion 1 of chapter 552 of the acts of 1946, and inserting in 
place thereof the following section: — Section 6 A. The 
board and the commissioner, and one person to be appointed 
by the governor, with the advice and consent of the council, 
who shall be a member of a local labor union or affiliated 
with a national or international union, are hereby consti- 
tuted and designated as the state board for vocational edu- 
cation, to co-operate with the office of education, Federal 
Security Agency, or its successor, (1) in the administration 
of the act of congress approved February twenty-third, nine- 
teen hundred and seventeen, and any acts in amendment 
thereof and in addition thereto, relating to vocational edu- 
cation in agriculture, distributive occupations, household 
arts, and trades and industries, and secure for the common- 
wealth the benefits thereof; (2) in the administration of the 
act of congress approved June second, nineteen hundred and 
twenty, entitled "An Act to provide for the promotion of 
vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry and 
otherwise and their return to civil employment", and any 
acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, and to 
secure for the commonwealth the benefits thereof; and (3) to 
co-operate with the veterans administration in the adminis- 
tration of federal laws and regulations relative to the rehabili- 
tation of disabled veterans of World War II, and to secure 
for the commonwealth the benefits of said laws and regula- 
tions; and to perform such other duties as may be imposed 
upon it by law. The state board for vocational education 
shall be furnished with suitable quarters in the state house 
and may expend for salaries and other necessary expenses 
such amount as shall be appropriated therefor by the general 
court, together with any funds received by the state treasurer 
from the federal government under any of said acts. 

Section 8. Said chapter 15 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 6B, inserted by section 1 of chapter 
676 of the acts of 1941, and inserting in place thereof the 
following section: — Section 6B. The board shall appoint a 
supervisor of guidance and placement and prescribe his 
duties. He shall, under the commissioner, have general 
supervision of the directors of occupational guidance and 
placement appointed by towns pursuant to section thirty- 
eight A or thirty-eight I) of chapter seventy-one. The corn- 

Chap. «62, page 3. 



« 7 



missioner shall recommend a person for appointment to the 
office of supervisor of guidance and placement whenever there 
is a vacancy in such office. 

Section 9. Chapter 74 of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section 20, as appearing in the Ter- 
centenary Edition, and inserting in place thereof the follow- 
ing section: — Section 20. The state treasurer shall be 
custodian of funds allotted to the commonwealth from appro- 
priations made under the acts of congress mentioned in sec- 
tion six A of chapter fifteen. The funds so allotted from ap- 
propriations under the act of congress mentioned in said 
section six A shall be expended, without specific appropria- 
tion, under the order or the approval of the state board for 
vocational education. 

Section 10. Said chapter 74 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 21, as most recently amended by 
section 2 of chapter 552 of the acts of 1946, and inserting in 
place thereof the following section : — Section 21 . Subject 
to section twenty-two, the funds received under said acts of 
congress mentioned in clause (1) of section six A of chapter 
fifteen shall be paid out, on requisition of the state board 
for vocational education, as reimbursement for expenses al- 
ready incurred, to approved schools and classes or courses 
for training entitled to receive them under said acts. 

Section 11. Said chapter 74 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 22, as amended by section 11 of chap- 
ter 446 of the acts of 1938. and inserting in place thereof the 
following section: — Section 22. The state board for voca- 
tional education may use the funds received under said acts 
of congress mentioned in clause (1) of section six A of chap- 
ter fifteen as supplementary to state aid for salaries of teach- 
ers of vocational subjects in schools complying therewith. 
It may also use such funds (1) for salaries of teachers giving 
types of training selected by it as especially needing stimu- 
lus; or (2), for courses for the preparation of teachers of 
vocations selected by it; or (3), to arrange with schools and 
colleges to give the proper types of training to teachers of 
vocations under its supervision; or (4), to enable local school 
authorities to conduct, under its supervision, classes for the 
training of vocational teachers; or (5), for travel as pro- 
vided for under said acts of congress. Such payments shall 
be subject to conditions prescribed by said board. 

Section 12. Said chapter 74 is hereby further amended 
by striking out section 22A, as amended by section 12 of 
said chapter 446, and inserting in place thereof the follow- 
ing section : — Section 22 A . The state board for vocational 
education, established by section six A of chapter fifteen, is 
hereby directed to co-operate with the office of education, 
Federal Security Agency, or its successor, in carrying out 
the provisions of the act of congress mentioned in clause (2) 
of said section six A; to establish and maintain, or to assist 
in establishing or maintaining, such courses of vocational 

Cbap. 652, page 4. 












training as it may deem advisable and necessary for the 
vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry or 
otherwise; to grant federal funds in its control, subject to 
conditions prescribed by it, as money supplementary to state 
aid, in the maintenance of vocational rehabilitation courses 
in schools or institutions supported wholly or in part by the 
commonwealth; to establish and maintain under its super- 
vision such courses as it may deem advisable for the prepa- 
ration of instructors of vocational rehabilitation courses; to 
appoint such agents and assistants as may be necessary to 
administer the provisions of this section and said act of 
congress in this commonwealth ; to fix the compensation of 
such agents and assistants and to direct the disbursement 
and administer the use of all funds provided by the federal 
government and this commonwealth for the vocational re- 
habilitation of such persons, and in conjunction with the 
department of industrial accidents to formulate a plan of 
co-operation in accordance with the provisions of said act 
of congress, such plan to become effective when approved 
by the governor. 

Section 13. Section 2 of chapter 15 of the General 
Laws, as amended by section 18 of chapter 591 of the acts of 
1946, section 2A of said chapter 15, inserted by chapter 531 
of the acts of 1946, section 3 of said chapter 15, as amended 
by chapter 138 of the acts of 1941, section 19 of chapter 74 
of the General Laws, as amended by section 9 of chapter 
446 of the acts of 1938, and chapter 646 of the acts of 1941 
are hereby repealed. 

Section 14. Of the members of the board of education 
first appointed under authority of this act, one shall be ap- 
pointed by the governor, with the advice and consent of the 
council, for the term of one year, one for the term of two 
years, one for the term of three years, one for the term of four 
years, one for the term of five years, one for the term of six 
years, one for the term of seven years, one for the term of 
eight years and one for the term of nine years, from the 
effective date of this act. 

The terms of the appointive members of the board of col- 
legiate authority existing under section three A of chapter 
fifteen of the General Laws immediately prior to the effective 
date of this act shall be terminated on said effective date. 
Of the members of said board first appointed under author- 
ity of this act one shall be appointed by the governor, with 
the advice and consent of the council, for the term of one 
year, one for the term of two years, one for the term of throe 
years, and one for the term of four years, from the first day 
of July in the current year. 

Section 15. Notwithstanding the provisions of this act, 
the commissioner of education in office on the effective date 
thereof may continue to serve as commissioner until the ex- 
piration of the term for which he was appointed, unless he 
sooner resigns or is removed, with the same powers and 

duties as though he had been appointed under the provi- 
sions of this act. Nothing in this act shall affect the tenure 
of any other officers, any agents and other employees of the 
department of education or their retirement or other rights 
nor impair their civil service status, if any. 

Approved June 28, 1947. 

Chap. *>», pair* •>. 



19 



EEPOHI OF TH3 



COllIISSIOEER 



(TO COME) 



.0 



board or cqllbgiats AUTHoarri 

The Board of Collegiate Authority conducted seven public hearings 
on Art idea of organization, Certificates of Change of 8e*e or 
Certificates of Change of Purpose referred to it by the Conaaissioner 
of Corporations and Taxation as required in Section 30 of Chapter 69, 
General Lava, as amended by Chapter %9, Acts of 19li3. Of this number 
three vers approved. 

College of Saint Joseph 

The Trustees of the College of Saint Joseph, Fraa Ingham, 
nere authorized by the Board of Collegiate Authority at its 
aaeeting of January 30, \$kl to maintain and conduct a college 
for the teaching of the Liberal Arts, of the Sciences, and of 
kindred subjects $ ami to grant and confer all degrees such as 
are usually conferred by colleges in the Caasjonwealth of fuss*- 
ehusetts except degrees in medicine, and law other than 
honorary doctorates* 

The Oarland School 

The Certificate of Change of Purpose of the Directors of 
The Garland School authorising them to grant the degree of 
Associate in Science was approved January 30, l?u7« 

The Augustinian College of the Marriaack Valley 
(2aarri»<at^oTIe"sc) 

The Trustees of the Augustinian College of the Marrisack 
Valley, Aaaover were authorised by vote of the Board on isarch 27, 
19a? to maintain and conduct a college for the teaching of the 
Liberal Art a, the Sciences, the kindred subjects j and to grant 
and confer degrees such as are usually conferred by colleges 
in the Ccsa&onweaLth of Massachusetts except degrees in medicine 
and law, other than honorary doctorates* 

Appointments to Board 

Dr* Leo C. Donahue waa appointed aeabor of the Board of 
Collegiate Authority on Decenber 17, l?i*6 to represent 
Junior Colleges. Dr* Donahue's term expires October 27, 1950. 



21 



SDUCAUQlfAL LSGISLA'ISQK - STATE AID 

ro public school statistics 



As in recent years, the Massaehuse fcfcs General 
Court considered some seventy odd bills relating to educa- 
tion, plus several other bills closely related to education* 

"Hie department gave each matter close study and 
attention and, as usual, co-operated with the various im- 
portant committees; i.e., Education, Municipal Finance, 
State Administration, Ways and Means, Labor, etc* In the 
esse of bills which proceeded to final enactment, the de- 
partment participated in the preliminary redrafts, amend- 
ments, and final drafts previous to engrossment* 

A list of captions and references of important 
educational legislation enacted, of which the two final 
chapters (c. 652 and c. 679) deserve special mention, follows* 

Chapter 652 of the Acts of 1947 established a 
Board of Education to have supervision and control of the 
Department of Education. nils Act was designed in order 
chat the Board of Education should control the Department 
of Education in a manner somewhat analogous to the situation 
obtaining from 1*337 (Horace Mann) until 1919 (the general 
reorganisation into 20 departments). 

Since said reorganisation into 20 departments, and 
until the passage of -he above Ac t, the Department of Educa- 
tion had been under the control of a single person (Com- 
missioner of Education, appointed by the Governor, with the 
approval of che Governor's Council), which commissioner had 
complete charge of the department, entailing the sole respon- 
sibility for the conduct of approximately 1,000 employees, 
several divisions within the department in Boston, and a 
dozen educational Institutions (teachers' colleges, etc.) 
located in various parts of die state* Ihe Commissioner's 
control and supervision was exercised in accordance wi ch some 
160 odd statutes scattered through at least 11 chapters of 
the General Laws, together with at least a dozen Special 
Acts having to do with the Commissioner's memberships on 
various approving authorities, such as nurses, electricians, 
physicians and surgeons, phsrmacy, veterinarians, etc. 

It was felt especially during uhe recent years of 
expansion of the department that an inordinate burden of 
responsibility over tremendously wide fields of educational 
endeavor was vested in one man and that it would bt advisable 



to have a Board of education with power, authority, 
policy-making function, etc., to guide and direct the 
over-all educational aims of the Department of education 
and the above-mentioned act was designed to accomplish 
that end* 

Chapter 679 of the Acts of 1947 is "An Act rela- 
tive to Reimbursements to Cities and Towns for Certain 
Expenses incurred for the transportation of Pupils." 
Previous to said enactment the state, in accordance with 
the then sections 6 and 7 of Chapter 71, General Laws, 
made certain reimbursements to towns of less than 500 
families on account of high school transportation* Ihe 
new act (Chapter fc>79 of 1947) struck out the above and 
substituted a new formula which broadened the scope of 
application in the matter of cities and towns benefiting, 
financial returns, and included transportation for elementary, 
as well as high school transportation wherever the determining 
f ormula-f ac tors were applicable* A comparison of the old 
and new follows) — 



Old law 



New law 



96 towns receiving a total of 
approximately i&00,000 



25b towns receiving a total 
of $1,117,200 






&m LEGISLATION 



Ihe following ia a chronological Hat of certain 
Acta enacted by the 1947 General Court which relate to 
Education, either directly or indirectly. 

IS?* "~ 

Chapter Caption and Reference 

109 - An Act prohibiting the employment of children under 

sixteen years of age in factories, workshops, manufac- 
turing and mechanical es tabllahments. February 28, 1947. 

21 u - An Aot further defining the term "school bus" as used 

in the motor vehicle laws, and further regulating their 
operation. (l&nergency Law.) March 31, 1947. 

218 - An Act authorizing cities and towns which provide an 

extended course of instruction on junior college level 
for veterans and others to use the designation "Junior 
college" in connection therewith. April 1, 1947. 

241 - An Act granting jurisdiction to the Boston Juvenile 

Court concurrent with the Municipal Court of the city 

of Boston of complaints for falling to require a child 
to attend school. April 9, 1947. 

344 - An Act changing the name of the Massachusetts State 

College to the University of Massachusetts. May 6, 1947. 

357 - An Act relative to the hours of employment of women 
and minors. May 6, 1947. 

368 - An Aot relative u> the hours of labor of women and 
children employed in the processing of fish. 
May 8, 1947. 

384 - An Act relative to -he education of certain physically 
handicapped children. May 12, 1947. 

387 - An Ac t relative to the powers and duties of the board 
of trustees of the Bradford Lurfee Technical Institute, 
and of the New Bedford Textile Institute, and authorising 
each of said boards to grant certain degrees. 
May 12, 1947. 

399 - An Ao t increasing the amount of reimbursement to be paid 
by the commonweal th in providing higher educational op- 
portunities for children of Maasachuse tts men and women 
who died in the military or naval service of United 
States during any war or insurrection, or as a result 
of such service. itfay 14, 1947. 






406 - An Act Increasing ohc speed at which the operation 
of no tor vehicles shall be considered prima facie 
greater than reasonable and proper. May 14, 1947. 

418 • An Act providing that, except as therein provided, 

all motor vehicles, in approaching or passing a school 
bus which has been stopped to alio* passengers to 
alight from or board the same, shall be brought to 
a full stop. May 19, 1947. 

453 - An Aot relative to the aiding of blind persons by 
the Division of the Blind, May 24, 1947. 

497 - An Act providing that veterans who are not over fifty 
years of age and are otherwise qualified shall be 
eligible for appointment as teachers in state aided 
approved vocational schools* June 4, 1947, 

526 - An Act authorising the appropriation of money by towns 
for the payment of reasonable expenses incurred by or 
in behalf of certain injured school children. 
{"Emergency Law) June 13, 1947, 

561 - An Act authorising the governor to designate the 

second Friday In January as Good Government Pay, pro- 
viding for the observance of said day in the schools 
and providing for a student senate and house of 
representatives. June 21, 1947. 

594 - An Act extending the time for the matriculation of 

veterans of World War XI as students at the branch of 
the University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens, 
June 27, 1947. 



■• 



697 - An Aot relative to the tenure of public school teachers 
in the city of Boston. Juno 27, 1947, 

652 - An Aot establishing a board of education whloh shall 
have supervision and control of the department of 
education. 

679 - An Aot relative to reimbursement to cities and towns 
for certain expenses incurred for the transportation 
of pupils. (Emergency Law) July 1, 1947. 



CHAP TEH ©79 



Ali ACT relative to He itabur semen c to Ci tie a and Towns 
for Certain Expense* Incurred for the Transportation of 
Pupils. 

v.hereaa , Ihe deferred operation of this act would tend 
to defeat Its purpose, which is to provide reimbursement 
forthwith to cities and towns for certain expenses incurred 
for che transportation of pupils, therefore it is hereby 
declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preserve Lion of the public welfare and convenience. 

Be It enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
in General Court assembled, and by whe auth ority of the same , 
as follows; 

SECTION 1« Chapter 71 of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by inserting after section 7 the following section:- 
Sec tion 7 A» The state treasurer shall annually, on or 
before November twentieth, pay to the several towns from the 
proceeds of the tax on incomes, which shall be available 
therefor subject to appropriation, the sums required as re- 
imbursement for expenses approved by the commissioner of 
education. Incurred by any town for the transportation of 
pupils once dally to and from any school within the town, 
or in another town, In excess of five dollars per annum per 
pupil In the net average membership of such town; provided 
(a) that no transportation reimbursement shall be made on 
account of any pupil who resides less than one and one half 
miles from the school which he attends, measured by a com- 
monly travelled route; and (b) that the amount of grant, 
per pupil, for transportation to private schools in towns 
which furnish such transportation, shall not exceed the 
amount of grant per pupil for transports tlon to public 
schools. (here shall be allocated from the proceeds of the 
tax on incomes such sums as the commissioner of education 
shall certify as necessary for the payment of such reimburse- 
ment* Ho town shall be reimbursed for its transportation 
expense, in any year, an amount less than the amount of re- 
imbursement for such suspense received in the year nineteen 
hundred and forty-six* 

SECT10M 2* Seotion 7 of Chapter 70 of the General Laws, 
as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended 
by inserting after the word "chapter" in line 5 and after 
the words "Part f in line a, in each lnstanoe, the wordst- 
and aeotion seven A of chapter seventy-one* 






SSCTXON 3 . Section IB 01 chapter 58 of the General. 
Laws, as moat recently amended by section 4 of chapter 735 
of the Ac u3 of 1345, la hereby furcher amended by adding 
at the end the words:* and section seven A of chapter 
seventy-one. 

SKCTIOK 4 . Section of chapter 71 of the Oeneral 
Laws, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby 
amended by striking out the second and third sentences of 
the first paragraph. 

SECTION 5. Section 7 of said chapter 71, as amended, 
is hereby repealed. 



Approved July 1, 1347. 















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28 



Division of Elementary and Secondary Education State 
Teachers Colleg es 

3t&te Teachers College Salaries 

Early in Peoember, 19%, representatives of the Massachusetts 
State Teachers College Association called upon Commissioner John 
J. Desmond, Jr., and requested that steps be taken to develop & 
nore equitable clasolfication plan. The Commissioner suggested 
that a committee composed of a faculty member from each college, 
two college presidents md the president of the faculty association 
study the situation and ma&e recommendations. Such a committee was 
established, met for several all day sessions, and on January 6, 
19^7 » presented its recommendations in the form of a report to the 
Teachers College faculties, who approved it almost unanimously. 
It was presented to the Director of Teachers Colleges, and to the 
Commissioner on January S, by whom it w&« approved with slight 
modifications. It was then turned qvqt to the college presidents, 
who were asked to place faculty personnel on the new schedule and 
make the necessary budgetary changes. 

The proper administration of the schedule will baling about an 
upgrading of the quality of instruction offered in the colleges. 
It will be possible, under the plan, to attract and to hold out- 
standing faculty members. The effect will be an increase in the 
supply of superior teachers for the schools of the Commonwealth, 

The membership of this committee was as follows? 

T. L, Kelly, Bridgewater H. Broudy, North Adams 

T. Conlon, Fitchburg M. Stone, Salem 

f. Pratt, Framingham K. Berry, Jest field 

M. M. Gearan, Lowell D. Winslow, V/orcester 

P. Hye, Mass. School of Art Prea. E. Sullivan, Salem 

M. Gourville, Lowell (Pres. Pres. W. Sanders, Fitchburg 
H.S.T.C.A.) (Chairman). 

Expansion of Teachers College Program 

Under the provisions of Chapter 660 of the Acts of 19^5, 
twenty-four veterans of ^orld Jar II wore enrolled in the Liberal 
Arts course of the State Teachers College at North Adams this 
year. This Chapter permits the inclusion in the Teachers College 
curriculum of instruction in such subjects as the Department deems 
expedient in the training of veterans in the fields of art, science, 
and industry. 

Chapter 660 of the Acts of 19**5 was revised during the 19 J l6 
session of the Legislature by the enactment of Chapter 533 of the 
Acts of 19^, which provides that this instruction shall be for 
"resident a of the Commonwealth" , instead of "for a resident of the 
Commonwealth for a period of not less than six months prior to hia 
entrance into such service" and also includes menbers of the Armed 
Forces in its provisions. 



•s 



?9 



Teachers College Tuition for Veterans 

During the course of the year, contracts were drawn with 
the Veterans Administration permitting the Commonwealth to charge 
tuition for veterans of World War II at the rate of the annual 
per capita cost of instruction at sach institution, plus 15 per 
cent for instructional supplies. 

Eugene A, Sullivan 

Eugene A, 3ullivan, who succeeded Clinton E. Carpenter as 
President of the 3tate teacher* College at Worcester, took office 
on February 1, 19 1 ?-?. 

Hr. Sullivan wa« graduated from Holy Cross College with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 192g, was awarded the degree of 
Master of Arts at Boston University in 193^ and the degree of 
Master of Science at Boston College in 19^2, He also studied at 
Harvard University, Fordhaa University snd the University of 
Florida. From 19>L to XSjj, he served as teacher and Assistant 
Principal at the Horth Brookfisld High School, fforth Brookfleld, 
Hassachusetts, and from 1937 *° *^ e &&t* of his appointment was 
a member of the faculty of the State Teachers College at Fitchburg. 

During World War II, Hr. Sullivan served as a member of the 
United States Army Air Corps, from which he was separated with the 
rank of Major in June, 19%. 

Todd Lecture 

n 1 1 « i ii ii ii 1 1 I ■ 

The annual Henry I. Todd Lecture was given at the State 
Teachers Colleges and the Massachusetts 3chool of Art by Dr. John 
J. Kahoney, Professor of Education at Boston University and 
Director of Harvard-Boston University Extension Courses. 

The topic was "Education for Democracy— When?* . 

Civic Education Study 

Following the Todd Lecture Series, Dr. Kahoney inaugurated 
the Civic Education Study in the 3tate Teachers Colleges, under 
the sponsorship of Commissioner John J. Desmond, Jr. 

This is to be a continuing study in the Teachers Colleges, 
under the direction of Dr. Mahoney, and itc primary purpose is to 
develop a better program of Civic Education in the public schools, 
through improved teacher- training in this area. Another of the 
purposes of this study io to devise ways and means of promoting 
enthusiasm for American democracy among future teachers and school 
children, through improved practices in the teaching of Civio 
Education and through the more comprehensive oro#rane which may be 
developed from this study, 

State Teachers College at Bridgwater 

The period from July 1, 19 ] 46 to June 30, 19^7 # was for Bridge- 
water 3tate Teachers College largely one of adjustment. The war 
wae definitely behind us, veterans had come to ua in comparatively 







large numbers, restoring to a degree the old balance between our 
men and our women student s. Our student body from a wartime low 
of 29&, now numbers fcg&j with every Indication that many of the 
applicants for places in the Freshman group will be turned away for 
lack of facilities. 

As matters now stand, our dormitories for young ladies and our 
common dining room are taxed to their full capacities and our yeung 
men are utilizing to the fullest the supply of rooms for rent in the 
town of Brldgew^ter. 

Our follow-up program, one which attempts to guide our grad- 
uates during the early years of their teaching career, was very 
successful during the year and mm the hearty commendation of 
superintendents and principals whose new teachers were so serviced. 
It establishes a constructive relationship between the Inexperienced 
young teacher and h<sr chosen profession, and does much to maintain 
morale during the first trying year or two. This activity may be 
curtailed somewhat during the years to come because so many of our 
faculty members will be required to participate in the supervision 
of off-campus teacher apprenticeship*. 

It is a pleasant experience to record the healthy growth of 
our library during the past year. Our college department library 
now numbers 23,627* while the Training 3chool boasts a collection 
of 2,53^ volumes, all of this far in excess of the 15,000 volume 
minimum established by the American Association of Teachers Colleges. 
The administration is now studying ways and means for increasing 
the physical facilities of the library - stack space and more study 
room. 

Our faculty has changed but little during the year: Mr. Paul 
Greeley, a member of the art department has returned to the W'althaa 
school department after a year 1 s lea*e of absence (19*"6-W« ^r, 
Frederic* A. Mela*, Dean of Men and a member of the Physical Educa- 
tion Deportment, was awarded a fellowship for the year 19^7""*^ by 
the University of Indiana for graduate study in the field of Public 
Health. In the meantime, Kr. Knute Anderson is substituting for 
Mr. Holer in the office of Dean of Men and in the Department of 
Physical Education. 

Bridgewater, as a ®rvice center, has aided the towns of Barn- 
stable and Bridgewater in the revision of curricula. 3o successful 
has been the advisory uork. in this field that the superintendents 
of surrounding towns have requested the establishment of a permanent 
clinic to which they may look for guidance and direction. This is 
a highly desirable project and it is hoped that something tangible 
nay be done to promote the fulfillment of plans and hopes. 

The Summer 3chool of 19^o, which extended from July 1 to 
August 9, for teachers in service, continued to show a marked gain 
in numbers and courses over the previous years to ouch a degree 
that it now seems to have become one of the traditional fixtures 
in the general program of academic activities. 

The Workshop is proving to be an invaluable aid to teachers 
for it affords an opportunity for researoh work on individual 









professional problems under guidance, ;?ith conferences and help 
In locating sources, planning procedures and evaluating progress. 
Ho other fact of the Summer School program has been 00 unstlntingly 
praised. Its effectiveness carries into the classrooms of those 
teachers who have enrolled in workshop courses. 

The extra-curricular calendar of the college was filled and 
very active} the clubs, some of which curtailed activities during 
the war years, carried through ambitious programs to successful 
conclusions, a pleasing indication of return to sane living. 

fftate Teachers CjflXgB* &J £**#*«»« 
Student Personnel 

iii» 11 11 ...I. ■ - h iiii ' i n 1 rm 1 < ii 1 

fhe enrollment increased from 3^3 full- time: students in the 
spring of 1946 to Jm for 19^7* & large entering class accounting 
for the Increase. All members of the entering class were inter- 
viewed by faculty committees with the expectation of securing better 
candidates for teaching, This was a new departure in accordance 
with the recommendation of the American Association of Teachers 
Colleges, and has resulted in a superior freshman class. 

Curriculum 

— m » wiii ■ wi mm * w i n 

The curriculum set up by faculty committees in 19 } '-5 was put 
in operation, and applied not only to the entering ela«fl but "to 
all classes. As reported last year, it consists of a core of 

eral education, and, a professional urogram in the Junior and 
senior years in which there is a greater oegre© of integration of 
professional studies, a reduction of repetition, and a resulting 
increase in efficiency of preparation to teach. 

Because of the revised currlcular offering, there is a notable 
betterment in student scholarship, 

student Life 

A mew men's club, the "Esoteric Society", was formed, and has 
taken its place vlth the "Mohawks* and the "Gavelesrs*. The club 
lias only veterans for its members. The women also have formed a 
social club in emulation of the men; the purpose of their club is 
to bring together dormitory and commuting women. 

Intercollegiate athletics were resumed during 19**&-19 ^i with 
varsity teams in soccer, basketball and baseball. The baseball 
team was not as successful as the other two, but a full baseball 
schedule is being planned for the spring of 19*1-3. 

An excellent intramural program in all sports forraen and for 
women was established during the yoar. As a matter of fact, 
interest in softballwas ao great that in a measure it detracted 
from Interest In interoollegiate baseball. 

ftr aduate Program 

During the year, twelve full-time and seventy nart-time students 
were enrolled in the graduate program set up by the faculty 






committee on graduate studies. The committee also produced a 
bulletin on graduate study, b copy of which la attached. 

Lt« Colonel Bogsr Holmes, A, U. S M resumed his position ae 

Director of Training in November. 

In September* Sckhardt Jacobsen, 8.3., Oswego State Teachers 
College, H*S. in Education, Cornell University, was appointed to 
teach Industrial Arts Drawing and Beslgpa. Also, Everett K. Koehler, 
B. 3., Buffalo State Teachers College ana A«K., Hew ¥or& University, 
was appointed in the field of Automotiveg and Electricity. 

In February, George F« Gondl&s, A.B., ZteP&tt* trniversity, 
Ph«D., Cornell university, replaced Etagene A. Bullivah in Physics 
and CneE&8try# 

James J. Hammond, B.S. in Education, Fltchburg Teachers 
College, and Ed.:.., Harvard, rep laced Willis 3. Anthony as Director 
of Industrial Arts, upon Mr. Anthony's retirement, January 31. 

Walter J. Harrod, B.3. in Sd., Hd.M., Fltchburg State 
Teachers College, was temporarily appointed in Mr. Hammond's 
position. 

Resignations for which replace&tnts had not been made on 
July 1, 15^7, were? 

tfelen Curry, Senior Instructor in Music - to marry 
David A. J. Burns, Training School Supervisor in Science, 

who left to become Principal of Lord Junior High School, 

Fall Hlver 
Vincent J. Glennon, Training School Supervisor in 

Mathomatico and Geography - left to become Assistant 

Professor of Education at Syracuse University 

(Mr. Glennon had been on leave of absence and his 
>osition was filled by Signe Antlla, 3.3. in Sd., 
►Ed«, Fitchburg Teachers College) 
Henry P. Healy, Training School supervisor in English, 

lefx to teach English in Leominster Junior High School 

at a substantial increase in salary, 
Josephine 3. O'Hara, Training School Supervisor in Art, 

to become Art Supervisor in the elementary schools of 

Brooliline, at increased salary. 

Elisabeth P. Lenk, Training School Supervisor, second grade, 
Eagerly School, to beeone Rending Suoervi qor in Auburn, Mass. 

Future of the College 

The faculty is being strengthened in r ^placements, and the 
curriculum is being strengthened ao that this college is not only 
turning out excellent candidates for teaohing positions (all 
students, men as well as women, were placed early in the sprli 
but through having men train in the group training for elementary 

echool principal ship a, we are preparing them for teaching prin- 



8! 






eipalshlps upon graduation, ^hzre is so great a demand for men 
so trained from the smaller communities in the Commonwealth that 
it cannot be met* 

Also, the curriculum is so constructed that it would be an 
easy matter to convert to a four year State College wit h a major 
m teacher training in the last two years, but also offering a 
program leading to the B.A. degree, 1 strongly recommend such a 
move as soon as it can be approved by the state Board of Education. 
A gtat#* supported community college is a necessity in this area* 
and with minor additions to the faculty and the fulfillment of 
present plane for the physical plant, such as a new athletic field, 
hew gymnasium, and tennis courts, -we could provide excellent 
facilities for such a program. 

State Teaofters College &$ fframlngham 

Our college was severly shaken by a number of resignations 
which were submitted shortly after July 1, 19^6* 

Anne Hoehefort, who had hism Supervisor of Teacher-Training 
since 1912, made her decision to retire a year before reaching 
the compulsory retirement age. Mlllicent Coss, Senior Instructor 
in Clothing since 191 ! *, retired on account of ill health. Louise 
Kingman, Instructor in Speech and Physical Education, retired on 
account of 111 health, after having taught at Framingham since 
1917. Kaael Dingman, Instructor in Art since 19 w t left to Join 
her husband, an American officer in (Germany. Ruth Carter, Senior 
Instructor in English, who had been on leave of absence for a 
year, decided not to return to teaching. Hiss Garter had hem a 
member of the faculty since 1927. Svelyn Keith, Dormitory 
Manager and Dietitian since 192o, felt that she could no longer 
continue in the state service, James Sullivan, not loo long 
returned after his term in the Navy, resigned his Senior Instructor' « 
position in Biology to take a Master' s position at Salem. Kuch of 
my time during the summer of l$k6 was spent in interviewing can- 
didates to fill our various vacancies* 

When College opened in September, all our positions were 
filled. Miss Rochefort was succeeded by Margaret Walker. Alice 
Srickaon was appointed to the position of Hiss Coss in the ClsAhing 
Department. Grace Conley followed Miss Kingman in the Physical 
Education department. David Berger succeeded Hasel Dingman. Grace 
Rowland, who had been substituting for Hiss Carter, was appointed 
to her position. Loretta Haley filled Miss Keith's position and 
George Kenny, who had been a war-time substitute in the Biology 
Department, returned to fill the vacancy oauBed by Mr. Sullivan's 
transfer to 3alem. 

Early in the summer of 19^, It became evident that we were 
to have a housing problem. Many freshmen seeking admission lived 
beyond commuting distance. A large percentage of our upper class 
students had already reserved rooms in the dormitories. It appeared 
that ws should b« able to take not more than fifty freshmen into 
the dormitories. Ws partially solved the problem, but were faced 
with a new one when we installed twenty double-decker cots in our 



dormitories. We were able to take eighty freshen as boarders . 
We had hoped that we sight add new personnel to relieve a staff 
already overburdened* We were not allowed to hire anyone, henoe 
our new problem. 

The difficulty of rooms will apparently be a continuing one. 
It may well be that we shall be forced to adopt the policy 
instituted by many colleges, that of limiting rooms in dormitories 
to those students who live bQ^onQ. a radius of twenty miles from 
the college. 

Our total enrollment for the year 19*46-19*47 was W, two- 
thirds of that number being in the Household Arts Department, the 
others in the Elementary department. 

Throughout the year, in our faculty meetings, we made a 
constant study of the problems which confronted us. Bean Lamed 
and I, at our own e:sspenee, had been present at the School for 
Executives held at Chautauqua, Hew York, voider the auspices of the 
American Association of Teachers Colleges, the most important 
discussion there centered on Practice Teaching. 

Our new Director of Training, Miss talker, applied herself 
immediately to the problem* We had felt for a long time that we 
were not mating the most of our opportunities in our Training 
School , Our students were getting a good ejsperience in observa- 
tion, frequent opportunities for participation, but too little 
responsible student teaching. Through the cooperation of Kiss 
Gushing, Principal of the Training School, and Kiss Walker, much 
progress has been made. 

The practice teaching experience in the Borne Economics 
Department has been strengthened by additional opportunities for 
observation. 

Many of our problems during the year reeulted from our hope- 
less auditorium situation and our wholly inadequate gymnasium* 
The great opportunity to develop a good college spirit cones from 
meetings in which all participate - faculty and students alike. 
Our auditorium is far too small for such noetlngo. Our gymnasium 
is archaio and inadeouate and comes close to being a fire hazard 
If not aotually a fire-trap, We are hopeful that one day my 
recommendation for a new auditorium and gymnasium may be accepted 
by the Legislature. 

During the year, many of our faculty members addressed public 
gatherings in our area, we had membership on committees for 
community welfare and lmproTement, We participated in local fund 
raising drives. Kr« Gilday, as in the past, volunteered his 
servlcos in training the Framingham Community Chorus, now well- 
known throughout new England, we seek out every opportunity to 
Improve our . -ublio relations. 

We are conflict that with the unfailing support of the 
Department of Education, PramlnKham will continue to novo forward. 



V-rf M .t 






State Teachers College, J$. t<n*ell 

In September, 19^, the largest freshman class since 19^1 
entered Lowell teachers College, BNarty-four students were admitted 
to the Elementary Course and twenty^sibK to the Music Course. The 
normal quota Tor the freshman class is sixty Elementary and fifteen 
Music students* but we admitted all qualified applicants for the 
Elementary Course and increased the number of Music students 
because we have not had enough graduates during the last two or 
three years to meet the demand for music supervision. 

There was one change in the Lowell Teachers College faculty 
this past year. The Director of Training retired sjnd a successor 
was appointed. The Head of the Music Pepartment retired in June, 
but no one has been appointed to succeed her as yet. 

The students began publication of a school paper, *Ths Campus 
Star 11 , at the beginning of the school year. 

Most of t he senior students accepted positions in the early 
months of 19^7 «*ra all \mru placed before the close of the year. 
There were many requests for teachers to fill vacancies for which 
we had no available candidates. 

In the f all* the graduates of the Class of 19^6 were invited 
to the College oft a Saturday to report on their experiences in 
their new positions and to discuss any problems which they might 
receive any help and advice on from members of the faculty. This 
meeting was well attended and proved to be very helpful to the new 
teachers as well as to the faculty. 

In addition to the intercollegiate sports activities carried 
on at the college during the year, the alumnae returned the day 
following Thanksgiving and on several other occasions to partici- 
pate in sports events. 

Members of the Elementary Principals* Association in the 
Lowell area held several evening meetings with members of the 
faculty at the college during the year and the group d isoussions 
and exchange of educational opinions carried on proved benefioial 
to all who participated. 

State Teachers Colls ftp at North *daag 

The college year 19 ? ^-19^7 was marked by a very rapid 
increase in enrollment. The total membership for l^-J^Ab* was 
79, of which 56 were "women and 23 were men. Of the 23 men, 21 
were veterans. The enrollment for 19*^6-^7 reached 157, of */hlch 
70 were women and S7 were men. Of the &7 m ® n # 66 were veterans. 
This doubling of the enrollment taxed heavily our staff and equip- 
ment, but wsSTrere able to offer all the es ential courses by the 
addition of one full-tine member of the faculty for the teaching 
of Advanced Mathematics, Chemistry, ad Physical Education for 
men, and of one part-time instructor for the teaching of English. 



36 



The coning of men trans formed in many ways the character 
of the college. The veterans, in general, were a very eeriotis 

>up or students who 'mew very definitely arbat Shey nd 

were willing to put forth the necessary effort to succeed. 
Their grades were markedly higher than the non-vo'- roup. 

Prom a college dominated by female Influence, we eaae to be a 
college Influenced by a large number of wen, alder thafi the 
a vera,—;, -nd with the freshman class la;- the other 

clashes combined, and it was difficult to serve many of our 

valued traditions, and control by the upper elaacraen* The year 
vas characterised by all the disturbing factors of a transition 
period. However, we preserved and even r« our standards of 

scholar ship. 

One very encouraging result for the teaching profession is 
that over half of t' feteraaa are returning tor a second year 
and <?.re interested in becoming teachers. organised an effective 

counseling staff and were able, by both personal and group 
conferences in guiding niaay of the O.I.'a into fields in which 
they could succeed. We were limited in the courses we alght 
offer because of inadequate laboratory facilities and the ^repara- 
tion and number of our faculty. 

There remains the great problem of enlisting interest in 
elementary sohool teaching. Here is whom the threat shortage 
is, and will be for a number of years. i&ll now have men 

for the Junior high grades* but ill be few qualified 

teachers for the lower grades, frae increase in salary schedules 
should interest more, but until the Teachers Colleges oan compete 
on an even basis with other colleges in faculty, in equipment, 
in social and recreation^ o ities and in all the intangibles 

-which £lve an educational institution restlge, our recruiting 
campaigns will be relatively ineffective. 

The College continued its program for t eachers in service. 
Our summer seesion was held in Pitt afield, instead of Ilorth 
Adams, because that city is in the geographical center of our 
area, and because of tha difficulties of housing and transporta- 
tion to our own callus. Sight full courses were offered. In 
addition, through the college year, sewn courses for teachers 
in service . iven on our campus. Also, our faculty served 

aa instructors in co tion iih xiiverslty Extension 

pro , in courses offered during the ye ittefield, 

, eeafield. This work ig very important 

and reaches a greet number of teachers who are qualifying for 
degrees and for professional 1 vement credits undr the 
new salary eohedules. In the last few years we have been of 
service to More Q a thousand teachers. 

Important as this service is, our prlnary function is to 
educate and prepare teachers for th9 elementary schools. 1th 
the influx of oon and all the resultant disturbing factors in 
this transition &d. e hive not it of the purpose 

for which the c e ia established - to prepare ,*ood teachers 

for the children of our Commonwealth. 



O 



u 



State Teachers Co llets at Salem 

ii m .—..-- m il) i n i u .i. « i- . W H ' , ii i » i r i» m ■■! i n I II I' " I I' ill 

College opened in September. 19^> with m enroll^crt of 
three hundred and ninety- three students, fifty- seven of whom 
:ere veterans. It is interesting to note- thr.t Salea had a 
population of five hundred and five before the war. this was 
reduced to iwo himdrod and nlnety-t the imr and is 
now beinr; ented with surprising rapidity. It, is expected 
that we shall roach our capacity by September, 1$H&« 

r i'he period from July 1, 1^ to June JO, X9kJ witnessed 

many o ss in our faea| y. Miss Mary L. Perhim, &fth grade 
supervisor in the Horace Maim Training School, retired June 30, 
1946 aft or many years of faithful service. She was succeeded 
by Hi s 8 . inerva M. Eudgina, .^l."'. formerly r-??rirkci&al 
in Attleboro &nv. prior to that, an instructor at the State 
Teachers Oolle f Keens-, ttev Hampshire. 

Miss Gertrude 3. Goldsmith, ,A* t master in biological 
science at the college, retired October 30, 19**-6\ She joined 
our faculty in i-laroh, 1900 and a continuously for over 
forty-six years. Miss Goldsmith, a graduate of the State 
Normal School at Sales, pursued iwv education at Harvard, 
Columbia, Oxford, Amherst, and the University of California. 
Shr 9 attended the Essex County Agricultural School and : 
Lowell Institute. She did field work in Alaska and some of the 
national parte*. Shfl nt of our Alumni Association 

for three years. Her ^accessor is Mr. James B. Sullivan, M.S. 
who was transferred to Satan from the state Teachers College at 
Framinghom. Mr. Sullivan expect© to receive his doctor's degree 
in the near future. He i<; a veteran of i/orld War IX. 

Mr. Alexander H. Sproul, M.S., retired January 21, 19*5-7 
as head of our e I department. Mr. Sproul began his 
teaching career at Salem in 1912. He was a nan of extensive 
education and broad experience. He taught «t Boston University, 
Ohio State University, University of Oregon, and the State 
Teachers Col nla. He is - ithor of a textbook on 

commercial education. he vacancy is now filled by Mr. Bruce P. 
J.effcry, 3.B.A., H.C.'i., L.L.B. foi y principal of the B. F. 
y.m Junior High School, 'itohbur.,. r. Jeffery is nationally 
>wn as a leader in the ooamwelal field. Tie has served on 
innumerable committees and has leld office in many organisations 
devoted to the promotion of business education. 

A clinic to oorrect deficlenoie& in ^lieh usage a.nd a 
clinic for those who encounter reading; difficulties were estab- 
lished September, 19w and the r ve been so satisfactory 
that we ose to continue both of these innovations as 
permanent part of the college curriculum. 

Mr. Richard H, "ockett, B.A., M."d., L.L.B. was admitted to 
the practice of law before the Massachusetts Bar. He received 
his L.L.B. from Suffolk Law School . 

In March, 19^7 » our college paper, "The Log" received All- 
Columbian Honors in ty - at the Columbia Press Association 
Convention. Also, speoial mention was made of the excellence of 
the editorial columns. 



38 



Mies Helen J. Kelly wrs panted t leave of absence from 
tT&nuary to June, lv'V7 to pursue her studies toward the doctorate. 

During the entire period, workmen have bean busy painting, 
repairing and renovating both the college and training school 
buildings. 

State Teachers College at l .'satflelct 

During the year July 1, %$&& to June >0, 19^7, the '..entfield 
3*at« a*s College began to fa. te impact created by the 
earnest desire of returning veterans for higher education. This 
resulted in higher enrollment in our freshman class. The increase 
in enrollment creat.- arobiem of Jceopin: ses within our 

ro relation. This was done by instltutl:. 3rgc-noy economies 
which naturally we could net. be exsctscl to continue ana at the 
same time run our institution on a healthy basis. 

The enrollment in the freshman class, September, U&£* of 
slxty^one necessitated the formation of two sections, of this 
class. 3y March, 19^6, we could look forvard to a freshman class 
of approximately 70 ?ov the school year WWf^l$m f which would 
also have to be divided into two sections. We, therefore, had 
to anticipate increased expenditures in -ersonal ncrvicee md 
our supply accounts and request s were made for same. 



The enrollment for the school year 19^-^7 *&* l ! -£, an 
increase of ^7. The anticipated enrollment for September, 1$^7 
was 1&0, a further increase of 16\ I would like to point out 
that the 106 year average enrollment at this college was 
^xlmately 1*HD. 



Among the freahmen entering in September, %$$£, there were 
is, many of whom were seeking one and two year courses 
pr if erring to colleges of their original choice. 

Within certain limits, these boys received offerings which gave 
them this ration. Many of them, after their one year with 
ue, during which they were able not only to personally ev te 
their courses, but also to obtain praoor oersTieotlve of advantages 
and opportunities in the teaching profession, have decided to 
pjn fr teaohinp. There were Light tranaferscto other 

inati J Ra m& probably will be a few more at the end of the 
second year. 

There seems to be I reason t te further increase* 
in en lent until the capacity is reached. 

The reolac.ifloation of o.ons as approved bj the Governor 
-nd his Council was a step forward in r. it possible for us 
to obtain the best possible candidates for vacancies in our 
tsachine; staff excent on the instructor's level. The maxiaum for 
this clasoific.tion is ao far below maximumrj of average salaries 
in the average oit; t it will be very difficult, if not quite 
lapoaalblc, to obtain cervices of teachers with five years of 
experlenoa and at least a Master's &8gr9e for these vacancies. 



I would like to indicate here th&t the amount of money 
appropriated for such accounts as Office, Supplies and Repairs 
have heen gradually reduced over the years, while the costs 
of all items to be bought and for labor and materials required 
have increased frost JQ$ to 15Q^. This throws a burden upon us of 
trying to operate this college with less than meets our needs. 
The decreases In these accounts ranges from 10$ to 2k% and these 
decreases have all taken place during the so-called inflation 
years. 

Also, during: the year l$h6^kj t we carried on our regular 

Srogram for the in-service teacher. This program, carried out 
ere at the college or in the surrounding cities and towns, is 
Increasing the efficiency of the In-service teacher and giving 
to many the opportunity to earn their Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree. 

During the year, the radio was used for the first time as 
a means of bringing to the public some of o\xr activities and 
making them better informed as to the nature and value of the 
work we are doing, m& the possibilities that there are in the 
teaching profession for the qualified boy and girl. 

State Teachers College at Worcester 

3hortly after the death of President Clinton E. Garoenter, 
of the Worcester 'State Teachers College, on June 20, 19^» 
Dr. Albert Famsworth was appointed Acting President. Dr. 
Farnsworth acted in this capacity until February 1, 19^7 # when 
the new President, Bugene A, Sullivan, assumed his duties. 
Great credit is due Dr. Fearasworth for his administration during 
these months. His task was the difficult one of maintaining the 
status quo in academic and social standards. Under his guidance, 
the Student Tea, All College Dance, and the Junior Prom were 
held at their usual time in the school year. To him belongs the 
credit of instigating the formation of a men's basketball team. 

In February, a ro ram was planned and put into operation 
by the public rel-tions committee. Many articles featuring 
activities of the College were carried in the two local news- 
papers. Publicity was obtained over two of the local radio 
stations. ith Holy Cross College, Clark University and 
'orcester Polytechnic Institute, (the other Worcester colleges), 
the Worcester State Teachers "ollege participated in a thirty- 
minute radio program on ntatlon WAAB in the months of April, 
May and June. Each college functioned every fourth Wednesday 
evening. It was entirely a faculty roject; each program con- 
sist in; : of three faculty me bers and two outside sneakers. 
Dr. Ralph Burns of the Eduction Department of Dartmouth 
College, waa one of these speakers. This was the first tine the 
College had been invited to participate in such a project, and 
the excellent performance rendered increased its prestige In 
the comnunlty. In addition, various faculty members at! the 
President partici v ted on ro. r .ms of radio stations both in and 
outside of .Worcester. The Glee Club, Dramatic Club, and various 
organizations in the College presented sever 1 radio programs. 



40 



Faculty members and the President spoke at many conventions, 
institutes, church gatherings and other gathering! of an 
educational nature. Interesting speakers &P .-d on the plat- 
form of the Worcester State Teachers College, Br, John Uahoney, 
the Todd Lecturer for the year 19 i ^-^7 spoke on Civic Keiucation . 

Several conferences were held at the college h'j Givfc, 
educational, and health groups. Superintendents of schools in 
this area, who met at the college previous to the War, *©re 
Invited again, and accepted the Invitation to hold their monthly 
nestings in the college. 

An inspection -rde to determine the physic?! condition 
of the bui. , As a result of thiaingpeetion, extra fire 
extinguishers were ordered, fire drills were held, and various 
improvements in respect to safety were made. Suspicion as to 
the safety of the gymnasium war? die covered to be un found', 
after a thorouii examination by a State registered architect. 
Arrangement r ? retube the boiler* by -vhich the 

building is heated. Plans »er« wade to taereaee the ~uality and 
quant icy of the soienee apparatus after inspections and 
discussions. 

The Worcester Girls' Trade High School, which had operated 
the cafeteria for several years, notified the college that 
because of a decreased enrollment at the Trade Hi -aool, 
they could not perform this function after June. After many 
interviews, a private caterer tfas given the concession. Plans 
were made to increase the number of hours each day that the 
cafeteria would be open. This w mid give con.autlng students a 
chance to obtain their breakfasts at school. 

iao .'lnifred C, Fitoh, Librarian, after years of unstint- 
ing service, resigned because of ill health. A survey was made 
of those librarians available for the position to obtain an 
Individual competent to carry on the work of Miss Fitch in 
determining the needs of the library and to plan its future 
expansion. In the allocation of faculty positions, as granted 
by the State legislature, 25# of the faoulty was rualified as 
professors. One member of the faculty was granted six months 
sabbatical leave to study for her doctorate. 

In t series of assemblies, the traditions of the college 
were stressed. oil inown and influential figures who graduated 

from the 'ercester 3tate Teachers College were nointed out. The 
fact was stressed that the students and faculty should be proud 
of the current and pact standards of the college, the college 
dramatic club nroduotlon and the Glee Club concert were better 
attended this year than previously. The school auditorium was 
filled at Commencement, the first time in many years. 

Cordial relations were sought and obtained With the other 
ViOrceater colleges. The Presidents of these Coll /ere 
invited to the Inaugural of Cogens A. Sullivan, May 13, 19 ! '7. 
The President of Clark University was invited to and attended 

several functions of the eollege. In turn, he extended invitations 



4 



to the President of the Worcester State Teachers College, which 
were accepted. Holy Cross College, which has no women students, 
asked If the Worcester State Teachers College would allow three 
of its women students to play the feminine roles in their yearly 
dramatic production. The permission was granted, and the 
College's dramatic teacher voluntarily and ably assisted, The 
College obtained good publicity in the Soston and Sew York 
papers as a result. 

A committee w&a forme®, of three faculty members to promote 
better school alumni relations. The Alumni were extended privileges, 
which formerly they did not possess, such as attending the $xmlov 
and senior proas, and the use of the school cafeteria and gymnas- 
ium for alumni functions. In June, the sohool cafeteria was filled 
for the Alumni luncheon, the first time in many years. The 
increased interest of the Alumni in their association's activities 
is expected to continue. 

The number of applications filed by June 30th indicated a 
large September enrollment. The enrollment in late afternoon 
classes for teachers showed an increase. It looked as if this 
enrollment would continue to increase the following year. A plan 
was devised for those working for th®lr B.0. degrees whereby each 
semester arecuired course and a major course were offered together. 
This eliminated breaks in the program of extension students, 
caused by having to wait for the necessary courses to be offered. 

In March, the College was gra*$e& permission to of f er g radttate 
work. This answered a strong deppid from the teachers of this 
area for the College to offer courses leading to the Master of 
Education degree. Plans were made to offer a graduate course In 
English and another in Education during the summer session. 

The usual college social events were held In the Spring. 
Probably the most important was the Scholarship Tea, which had 
Colonel Robert J. 'faipple as the guest of honor. It followed a 
similar pafcfrero to those of other years. This event helps to 
finance several scholarships for the College. 

With the thought of community service, the College concluded 
an ageement with the City Hospital in Worcester whereby a program 
would be started in September to teach undergraduate nurses from 
that institution the basic sciences such as ohemlotry, micro- 
biology, anatomy and physiology. This can be accomplished without 
Interfering in any way with our primary function of teacher- 
fcralning. The College received favorable comments because of this 
anticipated service. 

HAfHACHUftTTTS SCHOOL OF ART 

The vacation period of July and August, 19*W> was spent in 
special ^reparation for the largest enrollment in the hintory of 
the Massachusetts School of Art. The reorganization of programs, 
rooms and e<nlpment was necessary in order to provide adequate 
instruction for } \79 students, of which 153 vero veterans. One 
hundred seventy-five of the total number were Freshuen. This 



Increase of 75 in $&* ri-shrasn Class over the quotas of 100 
accepted in past years still ma not sufficient to oars for all 
eligible applicants* Admission was limited residents of 
Massachusetts, which eliminated approximately 100 qualified 
applicants ffrom other states and 11 other countries. 

Mr. Raymond A, Porter who has served the Institution in 
the Department of Modeling and Sculpture since November 1, 1915 
was retired* 

Mr. Jack Arenas was admitted to the staff on a full-time 
basis and the following instructors were added on a part-time 
basis) 

Marilyn Couriers ~ Fashion Merchandising 
Marguerite Franklin - Psychology 
Svbil Green - Fashion Illustration 
Rita HsManus - Fashion Illustration 
Mildred Sylvester - Fashion Design 

Evening School, discontinued during the War, was re-activ&ted 
and offered the following course si 

Elementary and Advanced Advertising Design 

General Design 

Fashion Illustration 

.TLenentary Drawing 

Life Drawing 

Portrait Drawing 

As a result of the currioulun study, 

1. The Fashion Design &n& Illustration Eepartnent was re-activated 
and new squipment procured. 

2. Photography was introduced as a required course and through 
private sources, $2500. worth of equipment was provided in the 
form of cameras and dark room equipment. 

J. A Production Methods course resulted from the school's 
contacts with Massachusetts industry. 

Further coopsratlon with industry resulted in a series of 
radio broadcasts given by President Gordon 1. Reynolds. During 
this series. President Reynolds interviewed a Designer and two 
leading industrialists. Qqphasls was given to the demands placed 
upon the designers by Industry and what constitutes adequate 
training for this highly specialised field of oreativlty. As a 
Climax of the year's activities in Industrial sooperation, 
President Reynolds was guest speaker at the Hay Boston Advertising 
Club luncheon and the Senior Design Division of the school designed 
and oonstructsd the central theme for the industrial exhibition 
held at the Institute of Modern Art. 

In its attempt to serve the community, the school established 
a program for producing timely posters to be used by the 
Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehioles. As evidenced by corres- 
pondence by Registrar Rudolph F. King, the results vere most 
successful. This program ia to be continued on a n annunl brtsls. 



43 

Peaigng were also created and executed for the Junior 
Division of the American Heft Cross. These «nm related to the 
exhibiting of A.B.C. materials and are being nass produced for 
national use. 

The annual Todd Lecture \ms given by Br, John J. Kahoney on 
* £dueatioa. for Democracy - When* 1 • Upon the recommendation of 
Commissioner John J. Desmond, Jr., the basic philosophy presented 
by Dr. Kahoney was injected as part of the course content of the 
Teacher Education Department. A .standing Committee was also 
appointed to carry oh this study and prepare related material for 
use in the other State Teachers Colleges, 

On June 16, 19 ? 46, a fire started by a faulty incinerator 
flue caused damage to the extent of an estimated %y5 t Q0Q* An 
immediate investigation of the loss was conducted and the necessary 
funds for repair of the damage were in turn voted by the Legislature, 



LEAVE JF ABSENCE OF ?HQ^AS A, PHELAK 

H IM ■ '•" »■'■■' -»' - i i ■ ! « H I' ■IIII HI *** III II ,1. 

Mr, Thomas A. Phelan, St^ervisor of the Teacher Placement 
Bureau, was granted a leave of absence extending from April 11, 
19^6 to Vpr 11 ^0, 1947 to serve as Field Representative for the 
United States Office of Education In the distribution of surplus 
property. 

During his absence, Mr. John J. Burns served as Acting 
Supervisor of the Placement Bureau. 

THIRTY- SE COND AKETJAI E1JCE OF SOTEPINTEMir- " OF X3LS 

The thirty- second Annual Conference of Superintendents of 
Schools wae held this year as usual at the State Teachers 
College at Brl<3gewatsr f beginiv >n Tuesday, April 22, and 
closing with luncheon on Thursday, April 29- • 

The Conference was devoted to a discussion of the general 
these, "Current Issues and Problems in Education and Their 
Implications*, and the many issues and problems in each area 
were discussed by well-known authorities s Klenentary Education 
by Rona dans, Associate Professor of Education at Columbia 
University; Secondary Education, by Galen Jones, Director, 
Division of Secondary Education, United states Office of 
Education and President of the National Association of Secondary 
School Principals! Education of the Exceptional Child by 'llllaa 
C, Kvaraceus, Assistant Professor of Education at Boston 
University; Vocational Education by John J. Seldel, Assistant 
State Superintendent for Vocational education, Ksryland; 
Industrial Arte Education by William J. 3toiders, President of 
ths State Teachers College at Pitchburg; Comr.ercl-:l Education 
by Bruce F. Jeffery, Head of the Oonraerolol Departnent at the 

State Teachers College at Salem; and Household Arts Education 



44 




by K. Catherine Starr, Assistant Professor of Horn* Eeonosics 
Education, Slamon* College. 

At the dinner meetisg on Tuesday evening, the principal 

a&drsss was made by Panlel L. liar ah, President of Boston 
University. His subject was * Sailing the Higli Seas of Education 
in a Period of Storm* . Commissioner Desmond presided at this 
nesting and introduced Dr. Harsh, 

0a Wednesday evening, the .Right Reverend <7ohn J, 
spoke on "The Vocation of the American School" . Theiu 
Qrindle, President of the Massachusetts School Superintendents 
Association presided. 

Others participating in the Conference were Mrs. Mildred 
Kahoney, Secretary of the Massachusetts fair Employment Practice 
Commission, who explained the implications of the Fair Employment 
Pr->,etiee Law for education; and Mrs. isthel $U Ireland, President 
pro tea of the Massachusetts School Committee Association, who 
explained the purpose of this newly founded organisation i^tlch 
includes upwards of one hundred and fifty of our Massachusetts 
communities in its membership. 

At the opening session of the oonferenoe # Superintendent of 
Schools, Franklin P. Hawfce* of West Springfield made a report 
for the Educational Poliolee Commission and Ernest Stephens, 
Superintendent of Schools of Lynn made a report for the Legislative 
Cosmittee of the Massachusetts School Superintendents Association. 

The Conference closed on Thursday afternoon with a report 
on the latest developments in the salaries of teachers given by 
Fred E. Pitkin, Research Director, Massachusetts Teachers 
Federation. 

STATS COEfFgRfaiCS jV . II :•;?:- V' I » ■dWmm.SOm OF JflJSKSflTARY 

*— -^HW%^W.^ l ' i a ill JU" ' " ' " ' "" ■ " mii ■■ mi i ■ ii m i i< i ■ n < wh p wiiw n il w m ii ■ ■ i> i i i » ■«■ ■ ■■ ■■ m il k ii li m i ii- h p. i mi» 



— ■■ — ■■»i..iii.»— 



The Seventeenth Annual State Conference of Principals and 
8«^)ervisors of Elementary Schools, under the direction of Alice 
B. Beal, Supervisor of Elementary Education, was held at the 
Massachusetts State College, Amherst, on April 1 and 2, 19*5-7 • 

Some of the topics discussed were as follows? "A Reading 
Program for the Elementary Grades"? "Principles of Education 
Basic to the Curr ioulua Guide for Primary Grade Teachers' 1 ; 
"Arithmetic*; "Health and Physical Education*! "Science"; 
"Social studies"; "The Use of the Curriculum Guide"; "Arf$ 
"Music"; "A Million in the Barifc"; "The Slenentnry School of 
Tomorrow"; "Some Problems to be Expected in Using the Curriculum 
Guide for Primary Grade Teachers"; "Group Study - Continuous 
Progress Program"; "Workshop for Teachers"; "An Experiment in 
Organising an Slemsntary School Library"; "Cooperation Between 
the Departments of Education and Public Health for ths Develop- 
ment of Supplementary Material for the Curriculum Guide"; 

"Cooperation between ths Teachers Colleges and the General 



45 



Supervisors aa& Principals for Kore Effective Use of the 
Curriculum Guide*? *A Program of In-Serviee draining of 

Teachers* • 

Approximately six hundred Superintendents, Prlneij 
and Supervisors were in attendance at this conference. 



46 



secondare education 



1. Proposed Regulations for the Approval of Hiah Schools 

The present regulations for Class A and Glass 
B high schools of the Commonwealth have been In force 
since 1915* and were revised in 1933* For some time the 
Supervisor of Secondary Education has been working on 
Proposed Regulations for the Approval of High Schools, 
and in October, 1946, a letter was forwarded to Super- 
intendents and Principals together with the Present and 
Proposed Regulations asking that these be studied in 
Group activities, and that replies be made to this De- 
partment. Many such replies have been received from 
individuals, as well as from Groups, and a final re- 
vision of the Proposed Regulations for the Approval of 
High Schools has been submitted to the State Board of 
Education. 



2. Evaluation of Secondary iaducation in Massachusetts 

The Sub-Committee on the Evaluation of Secondary 
Education has continued its work. The Heeds of Secondary 
Education in Massachusetts have been finally established, 
and were printed in the May Issue of the Massachusetts 
Educational Hews . The work on "The Program to Meet the 
Needs of Secondary Education in Mas sachu setts" was com- 
pleted and was planned to be contained In the September 
(1947) issue of the Massachusetts Ideational News . As 
was true of the Proposed Regulations for the Approval of 
nigh Schools, a letter has been prepared to Superintendents 
and Principals asking that the Needs, and the Program to 
Meet These Needs be discussed in Group activities for 
1947-43. 



3. Discussion Groups 

Discussion Groups of High School Principals 
have continued to function with a renewed activity and 
interest since the war. The Supervisor of Lecondary ^Sdu- 
cation has been annually elected Coordinator of the Massa- 
chusetts High School Principals' Association, his duties 
being to coordinate the Department of Education, the 
Massachusetts High School principals ' Association, and 
the National Association of Seoondary- School Principals. 



47 



4. Seoondarv Education In general 

It la becoming increasingly evident that in 
a comparatively few years , there will be practically 
lOOjfc of boy a end girls of the high school age level in 
the secondary schools* For years there have been de- 
termined efforts to adapt the curriculum to meet the 
needs of all youth. Mot only must there be the usual 
subjects, that is, those of the college preparatory 
and commercial curriculums as well as shop activities, 
music, art, home economics, industrial arts, and extra 
classroom activities, but there must also be in the 
modern high school, provision made for Health Education, 
Guidance, Safety including Driver Education, Consumer 
Education, Aviation Education, with a testing program 
and audio and visual aids. 



5* Miscellaneous 

The Massachusetts High School Principals 9 
Association has initiated a new publication entitled 
"The Massachusetts High School Principals 1 Bulletin," 
in which it has been possible for the Supervisor of 
Secondary Education to issue certain information be- 
sides several specific articles such as list of gradua- 
tion speakers, discussion on the Proposed Regulations 
for the Approval of High Schools, changes of High 
School Principals, etc* In the Massachusetts Edu- 
cational News there have been specific write-ups on 
the Massachusetts graduation exercises in 1946, on the 
Proposed Regulations for the Approval of High Schools, 
on the Praminjham Conference, on the Needs of Secondary 
Education, as prepared by the Sub-Committee on the 
Evaluation of Secondary Sducetion, and on pupil-teacher 
ratios in Massachusetts High Schools. 

There are several collections in the office 
of the Supervisor of Secondary iSducation, namely, re- 
port cards, permanent record cards, handbooks, gradua- 
tion programs, and programs of study. These have been 
advertised, and itineraries planned, as there has been 
a considerable demand. 

A need for specific courses of study or at 
least outlines has crystallized, and plans are In 
process to determine the extent to whioh there are 
courses of study in the several high schools throughout 
the State, as well as to organize a committee to de- 
termine the advisability of preparing such courses. 



The list of activities of the Supervisor of 
Secondary Education for a year's time Is an impressive 
one» With twenty speaking engagements, twenty-four 
special activities including the planning of the Framing" 
ham High School Principals* Conference, and attendance 
at eleven conferences, sixty high schools visited, with 
a written report for most of them, with twenty-nine 
meetings of nine different committees, with ten Super- 
intendents visited in connection with certificates, and 
with eighteen meetings of four Superintendents' Groups 
and fourteen Principals' Groups, together with routine 
office work, correspondence, and interviews, his program 
is an active one* 



49 



Statistics on Secondary Education 

high school mmuMmT - is34 - 1947 

(Average Membership ) 

(Columns 103 and 117 of the Annual Report of the Department 
of Education, Fart II) 



Year 


three Year 


Pour Year 
Hl^h Schools 


Total 


1875 


mm 


15,826 


15,326 


1900 


««• 


40,592 


40,592 


1924-25 


- 


118,125 


118,125 


1927*28 


-- 


131,618 


131,618 


1928*29 


71,632 


49,715 


121,345 


1950*31 


85,357 


50,543 


135,880 


1955-36 


93,426 


69,042 


167,468 


1939-40 


107,257 


65,930 


175,087 


1940*41 


105,483 


64,407 


167,890 


1941*42 


96,437 


58,931 


155,568 


1942*43 


86,115 


53,525 


159,638 


1945*44 


80,608 


49,524 


150,152 


1944*45 


79,765 


49,105 


128,870 


1945*46 


78,524 


50,784 


129,508 


1946*47 


81,265 


52,054 


155,519 



50 



Vremlnzham Conference The Twenty-Fourth Annual Conference of 
Principals of High Schools and Principals of Junior High Schools, 
and the Twenty-Second Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Asso- 
ciation of Deans of Girls was held at the State Teachers College, 
at Fraraingham, April 23 - 25, 1947. Dr. Galen Jones, Director 
of the Division of Secondary Mucatien, United States Office of 
Education, and President of the national Association of Secondary- 
School Principals, made the opening address on "Current Issues 
and Problems in Secondary Education and Their Replications* " 

James S* Powers, Bduoational Director of the Yankee 
Network, save the principal address at the Thursday forenoon 
session, speaking on "The Radio in Mucation." 

The dinner speaker at the Thursday evening session 
was Dr» Warren V.. Knox, Director of Secondary Education* New 
York State Department of Education. 

Greetings from the Massachusetts Department of Edu- 
cation were brought to the Conference by Commissioner Desmond. 

Others participating in the Conference were Kr». Kerry 
S. Wright, President of the Massachusetts Parent -Teacher Asso- 
ciation! C* Elwood Drake, Assistant Principal of the Bewton High 
School, who discussed Br Bie Evaluation of Secondary Education. w 

Group Meetings were held for High School Principals, 
for Junior High School Principals and Deans of Girls at which 
there were "Reports From the Field" by Principals Frolio of 
Abingfcon, Pitt away of Ashland, Francis of Marlboro, Williams of 
Gardner, Andree of Brookline; Lane of Natick, Reilley of 
Pramingham, Thistle of IVelleslsy, and Cavanagh of Framinshamj 
and Dean Sawyer of Brookline, and Dean Sullivan of Lawrence. 

The Massachusetts High School quiv&lency Certi- 
ficate was discussed by Dr» Richard M* Gummere, Chairmen of 
the Committee on Admissions, Harvard University. 

"Hewton High School, Grades XIII and XIV" was pre- 
sented by Principal Raymond A. Green of Hewton, and Mrs. 
Isabel Stephens, Associate Professor of Sducption, Wellesley 
College, gave an address entitled "Qualities for Survival." 
Executive Secretary Hugh Nixon of the Massachusetts Teachers 
Federation spoke to the topic "Some Bread and Butter Problems 
In Education," 



5! 



AKHUAL .- 
194<5 - 1947 



S leraentary education 

Summer I nstitute for Elementary. t>chool Teacher i 

A four-day Institute •under the direction of Alice I . 
Beal, Supervisor of antary ^education, was held on June 25, 

24, 25 and 26, 1947, at Oesley College, Cambridge, in order that 
super intendente, principals and teachers might have an oppor- 
tunity to study •>. Curriculum Guide for Primary Grade Teachers," 

Twenty-four speakers acted as teachers, consultants 
and demonstration leaders at this conference. - te speakers were 
artment of Education supervisors, mecabers of the Teachers fcel- 
lega faculties, representatives of private Institutions and or- 
aizations, and members of the staffs of city arad town school 

system** 

Some of the topics discussed were as follows: "Objec- 
tives oi - isntary :ducation Basle to the Curriculum Guide for 
Primary and Intermediate Grade Teachers"; "The Use of the Cur- 
riculum Guide as an Aid to Attain the objectives of the -a- 
tary School" j "The Use of the Material Suggested in the Curric- 
ulum Guide"; "The Rsadi i rogffta as an Aid to Attaining, the Ob- 
jectives of the Elementary 3eh©ol # | "Guatemala"; "An Overview of 
the Health and Physical ducation Program *eted by the Cur- 
riculum Guide* j "An Overview of the Social studies Program Su. - 
gas ted by the Curriculum Guide for Primary Grade Teachers"; 
"The Excursion as an kid to geaehing Social Studies"! "An Over- 
view of tne Arithmetic estad by tha Curriculum 
Guide"; "An Overview of t :-am Suggested by the Cur- 
riculum Guide" j "An Overview of the Science . am Suggested 
by the Curriculum Guide"; "An Overview of the .*rt Program Su; - 
jested by the Currieul ide"; "Guidance Activities as a 
Means of Attaining the Objectives of the Elementary School Pro- 
gram"; "The organisation of the classroom as a Keans of Attai - 
Objectives of th: ;entary School Program"; "Problems 
to be rcpected in O'si:. t Curriculum Guide for Priuary Grade 
ers"; "ooperation Catween the Teachers College and the 
lie ■ ouooli for Her active Use of the Curriculum Guide." 

There sere approximately 236 in attendance at this 
Institute, and, in addition to the topics listed above, it pro- 
vided rtunities for those in attendance to see demonstration 
lessons, confer with supervisors in the different fields, and to 
work on units of work, 

r lculum Guide for elementary School Teachers 

Tha "Currl aide for rriraary Grade 'isachers" was 
published and distributed in June, 1947, fty-five hundred 
ies were printed, and 5,100 copies were requisitioned by the 
erintendents of schools for use in the primary grades in the 
: wealth. 






f fhe committers who organized *'ihe Curricul aid© for 
Friia&ry Crade i.eaehers a are continuing the work on the organisa- 
tion of the "Carrie alum Guide for Intermediate Grade ieaciiers," 



Sadio Institute for 



Ale^ntary 



c-caool Teachers 



An Institute on Radio in ..education for l«as»nt*yy 

Teachers was held at the Massachusetts richool of Art on Saturday, 
March 15, under the auspices of tbs ctate Department of Aducation 
and The fankee Network* 



*2he purpose of tine workshop was to familiarise teachers 
with ra*io as a classrc aid and to assist teacher© in becossA 
acquainted with the present resources for in-s chool listening. 

The speakers included John J, Desmond, Jr., Coaaission* 
er of Education; Mildred AA &&rehj Principal, ward School, itewton; 
Anne . ilson and Adythe . .lark, both teacaers at t ..rd 

xool, «ewton; iCelssy . weatt, in charge of the Office of 
Badi&g apartment of education; Marcalia A, Aeliy, Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools, ;iolyokej James . nirers, director of 
..cation, Ihe lankee :?etworkj and Cedric Foster, Yankee -Mutual 
-est to Coast Hews o i .entator. A Ilea . >eal f . State Supervisor 
of elementary education, was chair . t m Institute. 



The committee in a o of this Institute consisted 



of - . . .a trick J. Sullivan, ,..<jlsey . . *eatt, 
of the Department ox Lon« 



arid Alice 



Baal 



ly46 kyamiiii Summer Session 



Warn 



49th Annual ,©sslon of the ^tate Teachers College 
of Hyaanis was held at tad Barnstable chool, [yannis, from 



July 1 to m t 9 , 1346 • 

merit of education was fc 



• .. :, h. . ; 

Director of 



.jsal of the btato 
the 49th Session, 



■>art- 



gfe* courses Mven and the namos of the instructors are 
j&uj listed: "PhllosopAy and Principles oi Uwasntary 

^cation" - Mizabai . . oeter, Director o£ Teacher Training, 
State Teaohere College. ti oester; r 'Adult education", "Problems 
and Procedures in &dult Mvic -c'.acatlon", "Basic llsh" - Liary 

{mi Guyton, State Supervisor of Adult Education, Cepartment of 
education; "Mstory of ast in Modern Times", "Problems of 

Present Day history and wociolo^y" - Dr. buniel U, .'^eary. Girls* 

chool, job ton; "tfasterpiocea of *vorld Literature", *C0 - 
temporary Aaerlcai . ought* - Thomas lieffernan, ^oston :. chool Da* 
partment; "Coaching Techniques in Baseball, easketball and Foot- 
ball", "Aquatics" - ihomas J, frhelan, Principal, Cnglish High 
School, Lynn; " uructure and Ctyle", "uistory and Appreciation 



ox 

. 



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and 



i-aniel ^al 
serial* 

n 



v , tate teachers 
for xeachir 



•-ioiie 
ticience" 



;-e. Fitchew 



Momentary Scie 
Nature Study" - Loretta . , Principal, center • cnool, 

Norton; "art ..ducation", ".reative .rts and Crafts" - Mrs. nuth 
R. RarriBCi -tate teachers college, i ■raioin.r.hsjnj j?ts and 

Measurements in tne .Momentary Sohool", "Histow of American 



5 J 



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St&tw Tooe&orft igo, r^i,,v«i*«£#r» 

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«orwl*o t&« qtuollfleotiosMi for tho position of it^tr&ftt sot 
of »or*ooi* in * otigHLrlntoadoQa; union* In aeoordaooo with tfto 
provision of tbo low, t&« ''ojM^tttont loftuoo eo^tlflaoto* of 
•X* '. : i- for »uoh #oi*wioo* 

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porottooot oortlfloato*, Sj .nary oartlfioat**, i;o| ton* 

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54 



The "Manual for Special Classes* H published In 1932, is now out 
Of print and while it contains much valuable material, it is somewhat oat 
of date. A committee, comprised of teachers and supervisors in the field 
Of special education, has "been organised to write a new manual. Three 
meetings have been held and monthly meetings have been planned for the 
year l$kS, 

A printed certificate of approval will now he awarded to teach- 
ers who are qualified to teach special classes for mentally retarded 
children under the provisions of Chapter 71, Section U6, General Laws. 

In October, 19H£, a six page bulletin was sent to the superin- 
tendents of schools. It contained the regulations and recommendations 
of the Departments of Education and Public Health regarding the annual 
census of physically handicapped children, the instruction of homebound 
physically handicapped children and the qualifications of teachers for 
these children. 

How forms for reporting the annual census and the individual 
census have been adopted. She annual census blanks are distributed by 
the Department of Education and on the reverse side there is explanatory 
material for the person making the report. She returned reports furnish 
the Departments of Education and Public Health with sore pertinent infor- 
mation and more complete returns than it has been possible to secure here- 
tofore. 

An association of Supervisors of teachers of the physically 
handicapped homebound was formed in the Pall of 19^6. Twenty-three 
supervisors from all sections of the Commonwealth were present at the 
first meeting. Topics of common interest were discussed at the first 
three meetings. Well-qualified speakers were presented at the next 
two meetings, one speaking on "Teaching the Cerebral-palsied Child,* 
and the other on "Teaching the Epileptic." 

In May, 19^7* an amendment to Chapter 71, Section H6A, was ap- 
proved. This amendoient concerns the cost of instruction of children 
confined in hospitals, sanatoria and similar institutions and gives the 
Department of Education the power to approve the reasonableness of the 
cost of instruction as estimated by the town wherein the hospital, sana- 
toria or fffrqfli**' institution is located or in case of disapproval, to 
determine a reasonable cost. Such cost as approved or determined shall 
be paid by the town where the parent or guardian has legal residence to 
the town furnishing the instruction. 



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Lieut. Cmdr. Hsiph H. wolscn returned to his po- 
sition as Assistant Supervisor of Physical tducation on 
August 15, 19*6* after serving twenty-three months in 
v*ar Service. 

During the year the Supervisor and Assistant Super- 
visor visited approximately ISO high schools at least ones. 
**t found Superintendents and Principals cooperative and de- 
sirous of receiving assistance ana advice in the reorgani- 
sation of their Physical Education programs. 

Huoh time vac devoted to t tudyingj plane for nsw 
buildings. Our opinisr*.* were asked regarding gymnasium 
areas, ©ailing height, locker and shower arrangement a sod 
seating facilities. Judging fro& the sustbar of ftXaas ¥t 
observed, there should be considerable school building con- 
struction operating in the near future. 

Kr. Thoaae R. Hinte* representing the Athletic Com- 
mittee of the Massachusetts Headset rfcere' Association, re- 
quested our office to assist in the reorganisation of Intsr- 
seholsstio Athletic Competition. As a result of our coop- 
eration, the high schools will compete in four divisions in 
plaoe of the former tvo classifications. 

The usual large number of requests for speaking en- 
gagements from schools, civic and athletic organisations 
appeared in the office. The Supervisor and Assistant Super- 
visor covered sixty-nine eng?£tjr:t-nts in Hu evening:. Fif- 
teen Saturdays vert spent officiating interooholaetlc ac- 
tivities. Ve continue to earve on several committees that 
meet at regular Intervals. 

For the first tine, this department conducted a Track 
and Field Clinic for high school coaches and members of their 
various track squads. Over f$Q attended the Clinic which ve 
plan to make an annual event. 

The annual State Conferenoa of Health end Physical Ed- 
ucation was held in the State House. Over $00 were in at- 
tendance. 

Another new enterprise was tried, that in, the promo- 
tion of a Track and Field &eet on the TJ.3.9. Randolph, ?outh 
Boston Navy Yard. Over 400 entries were received. The at- 
tendance reached 3500. I'rlses for the athletes were donated 
by the New England fc.A.U. 



- ■) 

i 



Conferences and Clinics 



Physical Eduoatior. Conference. • The Fifteenth An- 
nual Conference of Physios! ^tors **as held in the 
Gardner Auditorium, State House, Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday, March 21, 15&7. Approximately fire hund, 
a«a fifty physical education supervisors and te&ehers 
were present at both morning and afternoon sedans. 

The program consisted of the following addresses! 
Greetings from the Department of Education, 
John J. Desmond, Jr., Coaucissioner of Education; ft Cit- 
isenship and Sportsmanship '', Rsv. Gilbert iiod&a, Na- 
tional Chaispion and holder of the indoor mile run track 
record; "Desirable Practises in Slejeenta*? Cohool Safety 
Sdueatton", Hies Marion B&rtlett, i flncipal, 8*vm?d -ireet 
School, Springfield; "Are *e Up-to-d&te ia Physical Id- 
ucation?", Sri Peter V. Karoo-rich, r rof eesor of Physiology, 
Springfield College; ♦•Health Sdueaticn In High chocls 8 , 
li'r. Mary E. Spencer, State Department of i ubllc Sealth; 
"Protect the Power House", Br„ Frederick ft&roney, Bean 
of Students, Brooklyn College, New ¥orfc. 

Afternoon Session - M K«v Trends and Problems in Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation' 1 , ■ r„ frshk S. Stafford, 
Specialist for Health Education, Fhysie&l iSducaticn arid 
Athletics, U.:>. Office of Education, Washington, £.0. 
Masting of the iitate Association for Health, I hyslcal Ed- 
ucation and Recreation was held at 3 T>.m. "Reorganisation 
of State Associations and *rograin Possibilities*, >'r. Carroll 
Smith, President of the fcew ¥or& Stats Association fojp Health, 
J hyaical Education, and Recreation. 

Tree* and field Clinic. - A Massachusetts ?raok S&4 Field 
Clinic was neld under the au*r>ioes ef Ihs ^t.*te Department 
of Education st the U.S. Nary Recreation Building, ^95 
3uar»or Ttrest, South Boston, Massachusetts, on Saturday 
coming, January k, I947, at $:'+.>. 

The speakers for the Clinic included fftek Jcaciiss and 
Officials. Program: Chairman, Daniel J. *slly, State 
Supervisor of Physical Education; John ^heehan, Vice- 
President, National A.A.U. • Bart SulliYan, Holy Cross Track 
Coach; Oscar Hadlund, Coach, Aasaachusstte Institute' of 
Technology; Clerenea Dussault, Coach, lufts College, 
Jack Ryder, Boston Collets Coach, Jak*u> Mlkkola, Harvard 
University; William Bingham, Harvard University; Joseph 
fcoKenney, Director, Physical Education, Boston Publlo 
Schools; Thomas H. Ulnes, Director, State Keete; 



SB 



Herbert Stokinger, fcilton Academy; Bon Enoch, Hx-Hevton 
High Coach; 3teve Fatten, Boston Latin School; $ene Carver, 
President, New England Track and Field Official sj Rev. George 
Dovd, Catholic Youth Organisation; H&ward Parsons, Northeastern 
University. Director of the Clinic: Ralph H. Col son, As- 
sistant State Supervisor of Physical Sduoation, Chairman, 
M.S.A.A.U., Track and Field Committee. 






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60 



1 • Improvement of In*tr»etion ; Rev H?t*rtats . 

Each yesr an area, er phages of areas, of music 
oduo&tien £ictiviti*s, are selected for emphasis dur- 
ing psreerifcl conferences, regional msetinge, and 
classroom visitations. During previous years empha- 
sis vtgs placed upon (1) the need for a veil-organized 
plan of instrumental instructional experiences, (2) 
the immediate and permanent values of instruction on 
preparatory instruments,, especially in the lover grades 
of the primary schools, ("}) fc£*6 essirabllity of active 
participation in varied musical experiences, ik) the 
recognition fcfifi fostering cf the creative ability of 
the pupils, sn£ (5) the general and intrinsic values 
of school music literature in the building of correot 
attitudes tovards peoples of other lands. During 
l$5€«4>9*7 cehi'c] visitations, eYery opportunity vac 
geissd upon to he3p the teaciters to realise the 
eountless social, educational, and musical values of 
nev materials. 

II. Sohool Y ^ltationf j. 

County Tovn 

Barnstable Denni e , Yarmouth 
Berkshire Cheshire, Laneetoro, Sheffield, 
Nev Marlboro 

Bristol -eekonJt 

Bsser Lseex, Manchester 

Franklin Buekland, Colrain, thelburne 

Norfolk Canton, Cohaeset 

Plymouth Duxbury, Klngham 

Worcester Douglas, Millvllle 

III . Nineteenth Annual Huslc Conferenoe . "Widening ~orleons* 

The Nineteenth Annual Music Conference sms h*ld in 
conjunction with the Conference of Principals and 
Supervisors of Elementary Schools, Supervisor Alios Baal, 
General Chairman, Tueeday, April 1, 19^7* Bovker Audi- 
torium, took bridge Hall, 'Where t. The theme vas: 
"Widening Korisons for ;ubjc lOucation . 

Dean Kenneth J. Kelley, College of Musio, Boston 
University, served as co-chairman with Supervisor 
Martina McDonald Drlsooll, of the panel: What Methods 



And Material a Shall "ve gsmloy To widen Our Music 
Horlsons? Supervisors Florence Argy, Montague, 
Frances Fratt, Leominster, &©orge Murphy, Salem, 
William Boldridge, Kolyoke, Stanley Slithers, Shsl- 
bum©, Edward fiil&ay, framingrham , and Helen Ladd, 
Pall &lver, participated. 

An attractive display of Re* materials was con- 
vincing evidence of "the fact that general educators 
and music specialists are recognising the value of 
rcusle activities In the general growth and develop- 
aent of the pupils. 

Excellent community sinpinrr was ably stimulated 
by Dr. Augustus Zansig, Broofcline. 

IV. Community Relations 

greater Boston Youth Orchestra , Incorporated. 

Cooperation was given by the ©ffloe of Hadlo, 
Kelsey £. 6vofr *, iireetor, and by the Office of 
Music in the Department of Wu oat Ion to Curtis, 

in his orchestral development program for Greater 
S-^ton. Meetings war* attended in fcancheater, Go- 
hasset, an& in the "tate Education Building. 



Rovea 



7^th Annual ^aa oners Conference * v oroester County 
'ember 1, iyW. 






The Unifying Power Of Hucio was the theme of the 
talk given by the state supervisor of eusIc. 

Commonweal th Of K ass* chut ette : Official Christmas 
Progra 

in nil ■■■■■■ 

The program was presented in the Hall of Flags, 
Dssssiber 22, 19^7 as planned by Superintendent of 
Buildings, Gu stave Everberg, and tiio state music 
supervisor. The department of Education received 
written appreciation of this pro^ra^a froa Hi* Ex- 
cellency: Maurice J. Tobin, Governor of The Com&on- 
wealth. The 19^6 pattern was followed, - a capslla 
anthems and oarols were sung by The Guild Choristers . 
of The latholie Guild for the Blind", Theodore aarisr, 
Choral Director, and instrumental selections were 
given by the ttodford High chool T raes Knse^ble . 
Ralph I. Sehoonreaker, ^ireotor. 



6 



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VI 



Srester £o*ton Federation Of fr'ugle Olubg 
Cc.g.munl ty ~?gi*viee aeoreafcion , incorporated . 

He*, tar ship MM lv«n oomritteee of the above, and 
ana/ ase titles ware at termed. 

grvioea T£ 1 e r lit^rane. 

Public Lay jjj£. 

Visits vere iaa.de to applicants for approval under 
the &bove law, by the state supervisor of ausic. 
¥h@*5S finite extended from V/iliiamstawn to Falmouth. 

Servjaes tendered By flt j ate NueIg Of floe . 

Tha service* ^ridered by the state auiio of floe 
are impeded because of lack of budgetary provision 
for assistance of clerical nature. 



"»'*.' 



BEGIOHAL YffiRAKS» 33XJCA2IOK GMmS 

Upon the enactment of Chapter 660 of the Acta of 19H5 veterans 
of World War II were given an opportunity to receive instruction on a 
secondary school level at Eegional Veterans' Education Centers which 
were set up throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts* Within a 
short period of time after the enactment of the herein above-mentioned 
statute sixty-four (6&) Centers were functioning and providing instruc- 
tion to over five thousand (5,000) veterans. 

Hegional Veterans* Education Centers were maintained in the 
following communities: 

Arlington Marelehead 

Athol Marlborough 

Attleoor© Medfield 

Belllngham Medford 

Beverly Middlebore 

Iridgewater Minis 

Brockton Heedham 

Brookline Hew Bedford 

Cambridge Hewburyport 

Chicopee North Adams 

Clinton Borth Andover 

Concord Horwood 

Sasthampton Orange 

Everett Palmer 

Palmouth Peabody 

Pall River Pittsfield 

Pltchburg Plymouth 

Pramingham Provlneetown 

Franklin $iincy 

Gardner Bevere 

Gloucester Salsa 

Great Barrington Somerville 

Greenfield Springfield 

Haverhill Taunton 

Bblyoke Wakefield 

Hudson Waltham 

Hyannls Ware 

Lawrence Wareham 

Lee Westfleld 

Lowell Westwood 

Ludlow West Springfield 

Lynn Worcester 



64 

-3- 

Yeterans attended these Centers for the following purposes* 

X. To obtain a high, school diploma 

2. To obtain an equivalency certificate 

3» yor the purpose of taking refresher courses preparatory 
to taking college entrance examinations 

h. Tot the purpose of receiving instruction in terminal 
courses 

Classes for the instruction of veterans under this Act are held 
during the late afternoon and evening. This affords es-G. I.*s vfco are 
gainfully occupied an opportunity to realise their educational ob- 
jectives. In addition to the late afternoon and evening program, summer 
school was held during the summer of l$k6 on a daily basis, five hours a 
day, five days a week, for a period of el^it weeks. Over three thousand 
two hundred. (3f200) veterans were enrolled in this day school program 
and established scholestic records which are a tribute to their sincerity 
and seriousness of purpose. 

An important feature of this program which cannot be over- 
emphasised is that It is exclusively a state program financed by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts which does not take from the veterans 
educational entitlements which are due them under the so-called 0. I. 
Bill of Bights. The State of Massachusetts has met the educational 
challenge of the returned veteran as far as secondary school training is 
concerned. The effectiveness of this program may be determined by the 
fact that in May, 19H7, there were two thousand one hundred and thirty 
(2,130) veterans enrolled in evening school classes under the Regional 
Veterans* Education Centers program. Of that number one thousand five 
hundred and thirty-four (1,53**) completed their college entrance require- 
ments by September 1 of that year and definitely stated that they were 
enrolled in Institutions of higher education* 

Since the inception of this program a tremendous amount of good 
has been done in preparing our veterans for college and other educational 
institutions as well as preparing them for the work-a-day world. This 
program will continue while the needs of our veterans Justify the 
continuance of this type of training. 



6o 



SCHOLARSHIPS - CHILDREM QZ iim^ih BSCEASED WAR ViSTSKANS 



Chapter 69, Section 7B of the General Laws as 
inserted by Chapter 54& of the Acts of 1946 amended 
the lav relating to reimbursement toward the higher 
education of children over sixteen years, resident in 
the Commonweal fch, whose father or mother entered the 
armed forces of the United States in time of war and 
was killed in action or died from other cause as a 
result of such service regardless of the residence of 
the parent at induction or enlistment* 

As of June SO* 1947, 40 students received &ll,4o4,3t> 
in reimbursement toward their higher education* 



63 



Summary of the Annual Report 
of 
the Division of Immigration and Americanization 
for the year ending June 3u, 1-47 

During the year ending June 50, 1347, 28,517 services were recorded 
at the five offices maintained by the Division* Considerably sore than 
half of the number served called at the main of f ioe of the Division, 73 
"Fremont Street, Boston, as that office recorded 17, 228 services. The 
four branch offioes served 11,289 of whoa 3,865 were recorded at Spring* 
field, 2,622 at Lawrence, 2*430 at Worcester and 2,372 at Fall River, 

Our clients came from sixty-two different national backgrounds* For 
the first time, however, the largest single classification for country of 
birth was the United States—this category numbering 7,279* Considerably 
mere than half of these native American clients were veterans who sought 
to bring their foreign born wives and children to the United States* The 
next numerically important groups are the Canadians who number 4,467, the 
Italians who number 4,152, the Irish numbering 1,844, the roles 1,369 and 
the Portuguese 1,127* A new group, those born in China who numbered 430, 
also include many veterans of World War II* 

Our clients came from 279 of the 351 towns and cities of the Cemaes* 
wealth* The cities where we maintain offioes of course &*££ us the most 
olientsf Boston listing 6,8s8, Fall Hiver 1,775, Lawrence 1, o21» Spring* 
field 2,068, and Worcester 1,863* 

June SO, 1947 oiarked the close of the work the Division has carried 
on for servicemen and veterans to assist them in the technicalities of the 
immigration regulations which must be complied with in order that their 
dependents benefit by the special laws for wives, dependents and fiancees 
of veterans of World War II* These dependents had to be processed thru 
Var Department red tape, cleared thru oonsul&r offices involving much pa* 
per work and notarial service* There was also the more important job of 
convincing the veteran that the government was willing to help in his pro- 
blem if he was willing to cooperate in filling the necessary papers* It 
is greatly to the credit of the social worker who handled this difficult 
Job that the veterans found in her a friend and a wise and patient coun- 
selor* She handled a considerable volume of work with warm personal in- 
terest in eaoh one of the more than 3,000 veterans who used trie services 
of the Division in reuniting their families* The need of the specialised 
work did not cease automatically on June 30* In faot, the special legis- 
lation granting waiver of visa technicalities runs until 1949| the special 
law allowing fiancees to oovae non-quota as temporary visitors under bond 
will run until December 31, 1947, 

A new and serious problem in immi^rati n has oozae to the attention of 
the Division in the past year— that of the repatriated American* At the 
olose of the war, and indeed all thru the war years* the United States has 
assisted in the repatriation of its oitisens who, because of the war, were 
stranded overseas* J, any of these repatriates are married women who left 
their husbands behind them in the foreign land* Because of the quota law 
this separation, which most of the repatriates hoped to be a brief one, 
has run into years* The present law ;ives the husband of an American 
oltlsen only a preference in the quota* If the quota is small, as in the 
oase of Greece which has an annual quota of 308, the wait for preference 



is sure to be five year* and may be ten years* In the meantime the repatriated 
American and her children continue to he dependent on public funds and saust 
eventually repay the money expended for transportation for them* This long 
separation and the public expense it causes * constitutes a serious social pro- 
blem. In most oases* the remedy is a simple one requiring only a change in 
the lav to make the husband of the American citisen non-quota as the wife now 
is* It must be remembered* also* that many of these repatriated Americans 
were taken as infants to the homelands of their parents and returned to America 
their birth place* lacking knowledge of the language and the American way of 
life* Their adjustment is quite as difficult as that of the alien newcomer* 

The aim of the Division is "to bring the Commonwealth and its residents 
ef foreign origin into sympathetic and mutually helpful relationship" as 
directed by our law* The staff has endeavored throughout the year to give 
every client* whether citisen inquirer* veteran* repatriate or alien sympa* 
thetio understanding and considerate attention* 



67 






DITISI08 CF THE BLXRD 




Ou June 30 » X9H7, there were 6,503 blind person on she asgister, 
elasslf ied by ages as follow*: 

To § years 

Between 6 and 20 years 

Between 21 and 50 years 

Between $1 and JO years 

Over 70 years 

Ages unknown 

A susaaary of the work among the adult blind during the year follows} 

The Division of the Blind was in touch with 3*337 blind adults: 6,851 
calls were aa.de on blind persons In their hoses and 858 interviews were 
held at the Central Office, la addition, JS2 calls were made by Division 
agents la the interest of blind persons . 

Services rendered as follows: 

Financial aid granted to 1*307 

Industrial aid in the form of guides, tools or advertising to 18 

Assistance la the form of hospitalisation and/or glasses to 6 

Assistance in the sale of products to 16$ 

ifcmloyed by Division on staff 18 

Ssployed by Division in workshops 102 

Instruction by Hon* Teachers given to UU5 

Talking Book Machines loaned to 981 

Piano toning orders given to 8 

Employee nt in private industry and business secured for 13 

Social Service: 

Gifts of money totaling $3,6^3,65 distributed by 

Division agents from private funds to 297 

Loans totaling $7**5 arranged for by Division agents 

with private organisations for 17 

Financial assistance for educational purposes obtained 

for 5 

Gifts of clothing and fuel provided by Division agents 

through private sources for 38 

Writing boards, self -threading needles, etc.. provided for 32 

Guided ea shopping trips, visits to doctors, dentists 

and clinics 378 

Assistance la finding bearding places to 126 

Arrangements aade for medical, dental, hospital or 

convalescent oars for 89 

Vacations arranged with other agencies for 56 

Volunteer readers supplied for 9 



69 



Shis year 536 new eases ^«re registered la this office. They were 
classified by ages aa follow** 

Between 18 and 25 jeers 12 

Between 26 and 50 years 69 

Between 51 end 70 years 189 

Over TO ye*** 215 

Ages unknown 51 

These easts ware referred to us froa the following sources: 

Bespit els, eye clinics, doctors* eta. 
Individuals 

Public Welfare Agencies 57 

aslatlree 57 

Blind persons theaselvos 38 

Division agents 13 

State Hospitals 13 

Private organisations 10 

Clergy k 

Peifcins Institution k 

Veterans Administration k 

Sten and City Bates 3 

Other States 2 

UisoellAtteoas 12 

Unless othersise requested, our agents visit all nee eases and explain the 
services of the Division to then. While sane persons are referred to us for 
spsolflc services, others are Jest routine referrals by doctors, hospitals, 
self are departments, and optaaetrists, and these blind persons know nothing 
about the Division and its functions until our agent's visit. 

Tallowing is a suaraary of the services already rendered to the oases re- 
ferred to us during the past years 

Instruction by Heat Teachers given to 83 

gal*^ Book Me/thine a leaned to £0 

Financial aid granted to 121 

anploynent In private Industry secured for 1 

flaalal service of various types has also been rendered aany of the new 
eases. In addition, gift a of money totaling $SU5.95 *•*• obtained for 39 of 
this group froa private sources, and leans of noney amounting to $5^0.00 were 
obtained for 11 . 

WOK 101 QFI T f^WW 

Conservation of Vision Classes In ths Public Schools for children with 
seriously defective vision have been sunteaful and should continue to be so. 



-3- 

She teasers of these classes are very resourceful and must have a 
thorough, sy^&thetie uadeiwtsading of each of th«lr pupils and proceed on 
strictly individual lines sccMreding to tlie grade and visual defect, fflae 
jxaafcer of pupils in these ©lasses should lie kept small. 7o put too osoy 
children in a Sight Conservation Class would defeat the purpose, as it would 
detract frea the individual attention which these children require. Sons 
of these Sight Conservation Classes aight he acre efficiently conducted if 
they were in buildings where a sore cooperative plan could he worked out, 
*e feel that there are acre children who would benefit by the individual and 
personal attention given in these classes if there were a better understanding 
on the part of the parents ^» to the need of the special attention which 
their children require. In a regular class the teacher cannot give special 
attention to the child with a serious eye defect and the child has great 
difficulty in keeping up with the other children. 

1% is with regret that we announce the retireaeat of Kiss A. Harriet 
Haley, Supervising teacher of Boston Sight Conservation Classes, Miss Ansa 
Koran, teacher of the South Boston Sight Conservation Class, Miss Winifred 
asllly, teacher of one of the Jtesbury sight Conservation Classes, Mrs. Mary 
Sanborn, teacher of the Ipsa tight Conservation Class, and Mjss SHsabsth 
Scroll, teacher of one of the Mew Bedford Sight Conservation Classes. 

Buying the year the workers have been active on cases of acre than 
1,100 children under IS years of age. Visits to hastes and schools have been 
made on approximately 330 children. Shore have been 2fel new children 
registsred— 130 boys and 111 girls. 2hey were referred fron the following 
sources t 

Schools SI 

Maes. %e and Bar Infirmary S3 

Private doctors 32 

Boston City Hospital lh 

Parents 12 

Census of Handicapped Children 9 

Boston Kurscry for Blind Babies S 
Perkins Institution A Mas*. School for the 

Blind 
Other Hospitals 
Wyenthea State School 
Boston Dispensary 

Children's Hospital 2 

Hhode Island Bureau for the Blind 2 

Catholic Oulld for the Blind 1 

Classified according to agest 

5 years or under 97 

6 to 10 years 100 
10 to 18 years Uh 






Pinal aaenmt of irision* 



30/200 or less 

30/50 er better 

tfedeterBiaed &tft to £>g© 
Jtooa»t of vision sot g£na 



"tut laea than 20/50 



Causes of blindness and low visions 

Hyperopia 

fyperoplo Astigmatism 

with eoaw er@sn e» 

with ayatagsos 

with ptosis 
Myopia 
Myopic Aatigsatisa 

with degeneration 

with aystwgwn 

with convergence 

Jafelyopla 

astrolental Fibroplasia 

flewr* tiH tal- Cataract 
with nystagmis 
with " ftlo t rff fr t^l 1 ft5W f 

CoE?>lieated Cataract 

Optio Atrophy 

Aibiaiaa 



with congenital deafness 
with aniridia A nystagmus 

astinitis 

Bstinltls Pigmentosa 

Bet initio Albuminuric 

Chor lo-Het lnltl s 

Keratitis 

Keratitis Interstitial 

Macular Degeneration 

Birth Injury 

Phthisis Bulbi 



attached aetina 
Colobona of Cptie Disc 
Uveitis 

Miscellaneous 



66 
ho 

77 
16 



12 
1 

3$ 

2D 

k 

1 
\ 

1 

1 

17 
S 
8 
1 
1 
1 
k 
X 

3 
2 

2 



Seme of the services rendered were as follows t 



-5- 72 



insisted to PeJklns Institution 4k Mast. School for 

the Blind 20 

Adsitted to Sight Conservation Classes 97 

dear ffpm books loaned to 6; 

Bsferred for services of Buraery Hone Eeaehsr 



was of sngD«ass abb cohsshtayiom or tisiob 

l 7 « i » . mm* iiii »i ii i » ii iii i ii m il l i n i n » / i n I i n i. ■ . ■ urn — inm...ii» i n 



% 



She Diabetic Survey, made in cooperation with the ifaited States Public 
Health Service under the direction of Br. Hugh L.C, Wilkerson, was carried 
on during lite months of July, August, end Septssfoer. Diabetic tests sere 
mads by technlciane employed oy the U.S. Public Health Serrioe In clinics 
held in five hospitals In Boston and in Cambridge, Walthara, Medford, Maiden, 
Everett, Salsa* lynn, Xawreaoe, Lowell, Qnimoy, Brockton, Taunton, Bow Bedford, 
rail Hirer, Worcester, Springfield, Holyoke, and Pittsfield* Glinio appoint- 
ments for the persons she wished to he tested wove arranged by the weaker 
and transportation was secured through local Bed Gross Motor Corps and in 
addition, in Boston, through, the Boston Aid to the Blind and the Junior league. 
She worker attended each clinic in order to take the histories which were 
required for the survey. Olinics were also held for blind Inmates at 
Sewkebury State Infirmary, long Island Infirmary, for pupils at Perkins 
Institution and Massashae^Ua School for the Blind, and for children at the 
Boston Bursary for Blind Babies. A total of 896 persons were tested, but 
as Or. ffilkerson wishes to hare 2,000 eases on which to report no results of 
the survey hare been reported as yet. Be is hoping to continue the tests 
during the coning year. 

Sons of the person tested were found to be potential diabetics and 
were given still farther tests. Iron this group 19 persons were referred 
for farther msdleal study by their own physicians or in clinics for which 
they were eligible. Of these 1$ persons, U were found to be actual diabetics 
and are under aedical treatments in k cases diabetes was ruled out; 2 are 
under observation as potential diabetica; 1 hat died* and 1 has refused 



On March 27 and 26, 19*17, an Institute on Bye Care was held in the Out* 
Patient Aaghl theatre at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Institute 
was a joint project of the Division of the Blind and the Massachusetts Bye 
and Bar Infimary Bepartnent of Social Service. Invitations were sent to 
the State Dspartaents of Public Welfare and Public Health, Public Welfare 
Department* in Greater Boston, veterans Administration, private social agencies, 
visiting curses end school nurses, and schools of social work. About 1>40 
persons attended. It was accessary to Unit the enroUmsut, so that approxi- 
mately 00 were unable to attend. Members of the Ophthalaclogioal Staff of 
the Massachusetts Bys and Bar Infirmary were chosen to deliver the lectures 
gy ar. Bdwin B. Bocnphy, Chief of ffehthabilc Services. The lectures covered 
anatomy and physiology of the eye, congenital abnormalities, inf actions and 
systemic diseases, glaucoma, cataract, strabismus, and refraction, folks on 
the servioea of the Division and its prevention of blindness program were 



leaflets on flaaosem, cataracts, and strabismus were prepared with the 
assistance of Dr. Hugo B.C. Biemer, Sapervising Ophthalmologist to the Division, 



73 



and were distributed at the Institute, ftoaj have since been furnished on 
request to teachers, social wotkcrs, physicians, end private individuals 
both in Maseacimsette end other states, and have been distributed at sales 
of articles made by the blind. 

Daring this year there have been six restoration of vision oases for 
whom the Division paid hospital charges . five ef these eases were operated 
on at the Massachusetts 2ye end Ssr Infirmary and one at the Springfield 
aospitol. In two of these eases good vision was obtained and they were re- 
moved from the register of the blind. One ease Is still toe recent to obtain 
reports of final refraction, one ease requires further surgery, and two coses 
obtained only v^ty slight improvement in vision, fee clients who received 
Aid to the Blind were removed from the register after further eye examinations, 
refraction, and provision ef glasses were arranged. 

She worker has arranged eye examinations and secured required eye reports 
for applicants for Aid to the Blind* has obtained eye reports on psrsons re- 
questing talking book Machines, rehabilitation end employment. She has also 
obtained lnfermatiea regarding kinds and costs of medication and diets advised 
by clinics and physicians for recipients of assistance, has arranged for 
securing prostheses, hearing aids and other appliances far recipients of relief 
and other blind persons on the register, and has given advice relative to 
resources for eye care to persons requesting such infoimation iron the Division. 
395 persons have been referred to the worker for one or acre ef these services 
by members of the Division staff, by public and private agencies or by Individ- 
uals; 17 visits to agencies and 13 visits to homes sere made. 

Talks on asaaures initiated in Massachusetts for prevention of blindness 
sad the present program of the Division for prevention of blindness were given 
at the Institute on %e Care and at a meeting of the Council of Organisations 
for the Blind, the worker has alee assisted in the preparation of items for 
the educational Hews, the Bulletin of the Greater Boston Cosssamlty Council, 
and the %e health and Safety Hews published by the National Society for the 
Prevention of Blindness. 

Aff>gQ fftS BLQ B D 
Tmfls in the Af!ln 4 "*atratlon of Ai d to t he Blind 

since 33hh there has been a gradual and continuous increase in the number 
of recipients of Aid to the Blind. In the month of June 19^6, 1068 individ- 
uals were assisted. During the past year the number hae increased each month 
until, in June 19*17, there were 1187 recipients. About a<# of the recipient e 
are 65 years of age or more than 65 and the citizens among this group have 
chosen to remain on Ail to the Blind rather than apply for Old Age Assistance. 

She average monthly payment to recipients continues to increase, fills 
is principally due to the fact that budget allowances have been adjusted 
ward because of the increased cost of living. Due to existing sooncmio 



-7- 



conditions U in mors difficult *e» children to 3 attribute to ik* support of 

their parents, thus creating & need for greater relief payments to parents. 
Bates In boarding* convalescent end nursing hoses have else increased. 

She program will oontlnus to expand with the new amendment to Section 33 
of Chapter 69 allowing the Division to furnish nodical care to blind persons. 
At the present; tiae it appears that the appropriation to carry out this new 
prevision of the law will be mall. She services that will be provided will 
of necessity hare to be limited until a acre adequate appropriation is made 
by the General Court. Shis will steam that the local boards of public welfare 
will continue to be called upon to provide some types of medical service until 
the Division has an adequate appropriation to be able to take care of all the 
nodical requirements of needy blind persons. 

Applications f Of Aift 

An average of 26 formal applieations for financial assistance were re- 
ceived each south. 36 percent of the applications received were acted upon 
favorably and Xk percent were denied for Various reasons, or withdraw* by the 
Individual before action was taken. Baring the pest year the two principal 
reasons for denial of assistance were that some persons who applied were declared 
not legally blind after the official report ef the eye condition was reviewed 
by the Supervising Ophthalmologist, ana several other persons had resources 
In excess of those allowed and therefore need was not established* 



Payments to Individuals, in Bcyeafcer jghj an& & April 1$& 



»frTff*b*gffi$ 



Total 

aeoeiviag $1 - $50 

Receiving more then $50 



Bustier of 



u#t 






U.O 



April 19h7 Percentage 

Changes 
Humber of 

9*9 55*0 -4 

523 &5.0 ■* 



ffce above table indicates that in April 19U7 * smeller proportion of the 
total number of recipients received payaents amounting to less then $51.00 them 
received amounts In this range la November I9I16. The number ef recipients 
receiving more than $50.00 was increased in April 19^7. 



-£- 



Aid to tot Blind: 



IgffffiHTiW i iii Sfflff i r ii fii^ffiBSffy h ii j ii lX fflS i TPfff" . ™ i Ar^ i .S i gn 

er of Payments to Sot 



M23LM 



^ 



Beelpieatfl 



Total 



— 



Civilian 
Population 



Yernont 
Massachusetts 
Sbode Island 



aw 








59*607 
5,^38 




36.95 
36.95 

ho.81 



5W 

735.33* 
,^tgS7f g 37 



*/ figures on. number of recipients* payments to recipients, and average payments, 

from Bulletin, Social Security Board. 
J/ Sstimated by Bureau of the Ceusua. 



Aid to the Blinds Beoipients and Payaents to Beoipients by nonths, July 19**6 



Montii 



Ju3yW 

August 

September 
October 



Kunber 
of 



At* 



Payments to "Recipients 
Total Amount Average 

of 

Payasnt 




January 19**7 

Februajy 

March 

April 

Mar 

Jw» 



1099 

nao 
1130 

U35 



11® 
1163 
II65 
1OT 



*7.& 

¥7.6$ 
Us. 17 
U9.13 
>*9.Ui 
*9.«6 
50.05 
3) .16 
50A7 
51.16 
JBLAL 



The average payment in June 19**7 was $fc.22 higher than in July I9H6. During 
the year adjustment* upward have seen made in the budget allewaneee for clothing 
and food. Hurting hontt have increased their rates, and at the preeent tint 
about 29^ of the recipients are 65 years of age or more* many of whan here nore 
then one handicap, and require special care. 



dates .Closed, Jufr V** ** *y» TQ. V3ft 

Among the reaeont for closings were: 

Death of the recipient 76 

aaploynenfc or increased earnings of the 

recipient 12 

Vision wholly or partially restored 8 

Admitted to Institutions 30 

Receipt of Old Age Aetistanet 7 



-9- /o 

Recipients of f imnclal assistance also receive the other services of the 
Division such as heme teaching, the privilege of selling articlee aade in the 
hones through the salesroom maintained hy the Division, the use of talking hook 
wachlne a, and placement service, Private associations and committees interested 
in the blind are valuable resources for additional services* especially friendly 
services and social contacts. 

Care of the Chronical l y HI and ties Ased 

It is very difficult to find suitable hoarding hones and nursing hoses for 
blind people. Many private hoarding and nursing hoses and private institutions 
will not accept blind patients, especially when they have added handicaps such 
as deafness, crippling conditions, and physical conditions requiring special 
diets, and special nursing cave. The hones that sill accept hlind persons usually 
expect a higher rate for hoard than is charged sighted persons. Vor those hlind 
persona who have no relatives to assist then in locating hoarding hones, social 
work er s on the staff are often confronted with a real problem. There is a great 
need for public hospitals for the chronically ill and for those needing con- 
valescent cars after discharge from the husy hospital, as it exists today. 

W**»* ¥** mum 

talking hook machines are the property of the Library of Congress and are 
leaned to State agencies designated to he the distributors of the machines to the 
hlind residents in their respective States. She Division of the Blind has been 
designated the sols distributing agency for Massachusetts, and to date has loaned 
machines to 1,988 blind people la this Commonwealth. 

The talking hook machine Is a portable, electric phonograph with amplifier 
and dynamic speaker, capable of playing records en which have been transcribed 
various bocks including poetry, prose, fiction, history, grammar, biography, text- 
beaks on various subjects, the Bible in full, and many others. To date, 1,083 
wonts have been recorded, 110 of these having been added this year. (The talking 
beck machine differs from a oosmereial phonograph in that the turntable revolves 
at the rate of 33-1/3 revolutions per minute, rather than the 78 revolutions per 
minute required for commercial records.) 

It can thus be seen that the talking book appeals to a wide range of readers. 
The aged find In then a source of entertainment to fill leisure hours j the blind 
men and women who work during the day find then a source of relaxation in the 
evening; while the blind or visually handicapped students in our colleges and 
universities find then an invaluable aid, Ac it is estimated that 75 percent 
of the blind do not read Braille sufficiently well to take advantage of the 
Braille books availabls to then, the talking beck le a great benefit to them. 



-10- 

Thi3 year 133 machines were placed with new readers, bringing the total of 
readers for the year to $61. 

150 machines were exchanged during ths year. Shese esehanges are necessi- 
tated by aaehiaea needing extensive repairs, and the cliant la given another 
machine ao that reading stay not he disrupted for long periods of time. 

Ill machines vera removed durlag the year, Removals are generally due to 
the death of the readers; however, other reasons alee contribute, aach as 
defective hearing, Boring out of state* improvement of vision after surgery, eto. 

Many of the 981 machines on lean this year had to he repaired, some several 
tines. Bids division also maintains a repair serviee, some marines being repaired 
in the homes of the blind, while others have to he taken to our repair shop at 
73 Hewbury Street, Boston. Many Sails are made and many miles traveled hy oar 
agent in order that the revests, repairs, and exchanges or removals nay he kept 
up to date. However, when re see the pleasure and oonfort that hllnd people derive 
from the use of these machines re feel that we are adequately compensated for the 
work involved* 

Share Is no charge for the lean of these machines, for the repairing of 
defective parts, nor for the records that are played upon them. 3he records 
are ehtainsd from the Perkins Institution Ubrary, la ftatertown, Massachusetts, 
ftey are delivered to the homes and are returned through the U.S. Mail free of 



Inquiries concerning these machines may he directed to Arthur 7. Sullivan, 
Director, Division of the Blind, 110 Srcment Street, Boston. 



the problems of reconversion from war to a peace-time has is have affected 
the employment of hllnd persons, She shortage of raw materials is still a problem 
and industry has been slew In its effort to adjust to a peace-time basis, She 
disrupting influences in our national economy react on the employment of the blind, 
as well as those who see. However, our employment worker has been most diligent 
In seeking every opportunity for the placement of the blind in self-supporting 
occupations • 

During ths year 5 company surveys were made for possible Jobs for blind work- 
ers! U plants previously surveyed were revisited and certain Jobs analysed; 221 
hems visits to the blind were made; 36% office interviews with ths blind were 
held; 91 outside visits in the Interest of the blind were made; Ul office inter- 
views in the Interest of the blind were held; 26U telephone calls were made to 
the blind regarding employment! and 262 telephone calls were made to other persons 
relative to possible employment for the blind. 

Five speaking engagements were filled, and 2h conferences were attended in 
reference to pl a ce m e n t of the blind. 



fhore were six full-time placements made In private iafetry, aBd e» 
E&iphoao 6f?exs.t03* was pl&o&d. These placements trere ma&s in varies ester~ 
prises-~&oapitals, hotels, brush factories and private business. There irtrs 
elso three part-time placements; ©a© smswe placement; two full-time shelter*! 
shop placements. Several blind persons Obtained eaploysent without aid from 
the Division. 

Placement of the Mind in public wad private iadust ry sad nail has ire ss 
is a most difficult problem, aa& this Division is very grateful to the various 
public and private organizations eho have cooperated with us in our efforts to 
secure ea^loymant for she blind. 

W flgBC SOgiPft 

«£?»'. Jiiii in mlnUJ. 

Oils Uiviaioa maintains sis aojkNfeops for the blind— one girls' shop sad 
one men' a shop in Cambridge; aad four men 1 s shops* ia fall Blvcr, Lowell, 
Pittsfield, sad Worcester. 

Xa the Wooleon Bouse Industries, ia Cambridge, IB blind girls were employed— 
k ©hair earners, 6 weavers, I weaver* s helper, aad j power nj&ehins atitehers. They 
produced 22*657 pillowcases, to sell for $7,510.91? woven articles to sell for 
$1,500.00; fitting room piaoushioas to sell for $6? .30; reeaned 1,^25 chairs for 
$2,523,501 hcened towels for outside concerns at a charge of $70.30$ aad made 
various articles for the Salesroom maintained by the Division, to sell for 
$500.00. 

Ia the Cambridge Industries for Sea 51 bliad aea were enployed. They aaaafae- 
tared 5«*f&3 dosea brooms, 6,798 dosea mops, 18 do aea dusters, 16" dosea Prisoilla 
mope, aad 5h each rag rugs. 

The Pall River shop oaploysd 10 blind men, who reoaaed 770 chairs, sad neau- 
factured l.UOS dozen brooms. 

Che lowell shop employed 5 blind men. They assembled 386 robber oats, re- 
oaaed 7*48 chairs, aad restroag 27 tennis racquets. 

Za the Pittsf ield shop 12 blind aea were deployed. They resetted 721 chairs, 
restruag Uh tennis racquets, aad manufactured 717 dosea broome. 

The Worcester shop employed 6 blind men, who reseated 2,972 chairs aad 
strung 60 teaais racquets. 



The Division employs 7 Berne Teachers, themselves bliad, who travel to the 
of the adult blind throughout the state aad teach them to read aad write 
Braille, read Moon Type, pencil writing, typewriting, music, aad the common 
school branches; also all kinds of hand wodc, sueh as basketry, chair reseating, 
rag making, knitting, tatting, crocheting, sewing aad machine stitching, and 
leather welk. Many pupils b esoms proficient enough to make articles that can 
be sold ia the Salesroom maintained by the Division for this purpose, and at 



-12- 



apecial sates which art organised by our Sales Promoter In cities sad towns 
throughout tho Commonwealth. 

Sia work of tho hone teachers for tho 7097 ending Juno J0 t 19^7 may bo 
noid up as follows* 






dumber of pupila 

Somber of lessens given k t ^l 

Humber of colli mod* 3*919 

Somber of hours spent teaching k,Q$ 
Hasher of hours spent in preparation i,j 

Sumber of letters and cards sent 1,« 

Ifamber of hours spent traveling 3»5^3 

Somber of miles traveled 72,152 

die, of course, is the material side of the work: there Is also a spirit- 
ual angle, She majority of blind persons, as nay be seen in the Summary of this 
report, have lest their sight well along in life, Their discouragement So great, 
for they feel that without their sight they have no reason left for living, There- 
fore, the hens teachers, who are all totally blind, are a great source of encourage* 
ntnt to these newly blinded persons, who are made to realise by concrete oxasple 
that, though handicapped, they nay still lead an otherwise noraal life. 

To help blind persons dispose of articles which they make in thslr homes, 
the Division maintains a Salesroom at 73 Sevbury Street, Boston, and also organises 
special sales in various communities throughout the CosBnonwealth. 

A Sales Promoter is employed to organise these special sales. In commu- 
nities where sales are to be held, she contacts church, social and civic groups 
and secures their Interest end cooperation. From these groups a general com- 
mittee and subcommittees are formed, meetings are arranged and directed, ami 
sales organized, there are no paid workers at these sales, and very little actual 
expanse. Che sales are held in stores, dub rooms, hotsls, or public hells 
which are obtaintd ft— of charge for this purposes ami local newspapers give us 
excellent publicity. Following Is a list of the sales held during the year, and 
the amount realised at each sale, The full sals price of each article sold le 
returned to the blind person who made that article. 

Pitt afield (2 days) $1,600,00 

%ringfield (3 days) 2,51^7 

Fell River (2 days) 1.512. 35 

Hswton (a days) 2,835.65 

Sew Bedford (2 days) 1,^37.52 

In the Salesroom on Hewbury Street merchandise amounting to $h, 892.76 was 
sold. Two workers are employed in this Salesroom, and this year they received 
and examined 21,122 artiolea from blind home workers. In addition to the Sales- 
room work they also peek end send articles to the outside sales, and assist at 
these sales. 



•13- 






Through the above two mediums the blind hem workers of Massachusetts are 
assisted in becoming at least partially, If not wholly self -exporting. 



^•mimmtu i n —m 



Boring the year 51 addresses were made by the Director and mesmers of the 
staff before various social and civic clubs, schools, societies, public agencies, 
church groups and other organisations on the prograa of the Division and what it 
moans to the blind people of the CeaBaonsealth, Many conferences *ere held by 
staff workers with other public and private agencies and with representatives of 
agencies and organisations interested in work for the blind. One of our hone 
teachers still conducts a weekly radio program that is enjoyed by both the blind 
and eighted in this and other states. 

Oar constant aim is to bring the services of the Division to the attention 
of the general public. Many people have been, and still are under the Impression 
that the sole purpose of bringing a blind person to the Attention of the Division 
would be to obtain financial assistance for hi*. It Is our desire to acquaint 
these people with our various other services, and with the knowledge that any 
blind person stay nail upon us freely for help in practical* social and recre- 
ational natters, and for counsel and advice in the pursuit of their normal 
activities. 

She Division works in close cooperation with other agencies. It is repre- 
sented in the Greater Boston Community Council, the Massachusetts Council of 
Organisations for the Blind, the Massachusetts Oonferonoe of Social Work, the 
American Public Welfare Association, the National Bnhabllltation Association, 
the Rational Industries for the Blind, and other organisations Carrying on 
service programs on both State and Rational levels, Bepreaentativee of the 
Division usually attend conferences having to do with any phase of work for the 
blind. 

Splendid cooperation has been received from the Massachusetts Association 
for Promoting tine Intereste of the A^ult Blind, She Massachusetts Federation of 
Women's Clubs, She American Bed Cress, Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
School for the Blind, She Catholic Guild for the Blind, She Protestant Guild 
for the Blind, Boston Aid to fee Blind, Inn., the Massachusetts employment 
Service, Veterans Administration, Caap Allen, Inc., and many local associations 
for the blind and reading or sewing circles for the blind throughout the Comas- 
wealth. Shese organisations have continued to render valuable assistance to the 
Division in promoting sales, arranging for hospital treatment, vacations, trips* 
leans, gifts of money, training facilities, in securing employment, and in 
promoting the happinees of the older groups through friendly visiting and social 
gatherings. 

lions dubs throughout the state, other service dubs, doctors, hospitals, 
sohoel departments, and welfare organisations have been ^nry helpful in coopera- 
ting with this Division. 



-a&- 






Oar goal la to constantly liberalize and Inprove our program so as to be 
able to render noat efficiently and effectively the ©est possible service to 
the blind people of Massachusetts. 



/•S4./ 



Aapthar ?- ^I'llvaJru Mree'tor 



sanrisxog of nag sure 

glacial Report July l f lg46 to Juno y t lffi 



i 



Bscelpta 

1304-404 
1304-401 
1304-403 
1304-402 

1304-406 

1304-200 



Piano and Mattress 
Gaafcrldge Industries 
ftoolaoa Bouse Industries 
Shops - fall Hirer, Lowell, 

Plttaf ield and feoester 
Salesroos 
Licenses 
aefunds to Prior Tears 



$ 23,824.51 

109.7H337 

14,094.26 

31.5H0.25 

13.^5.13 
9.00 

IP*-!? 



H93.355.*7 



Dlsburseaents 

1304-01 
1304-06 
1304-08 
1304-10 
1304-U 
1304-12 
1304-13 
1304-14 

130^-15 
1304-16 
1304-17 
1304-27 



Geasral Administration 

Instruction of Molt Blind 

Aid to Blind 

Piano and Mattress 

Shop Operation 

Shop Manufacturing 

ffoolson Bouse X^d. Operation 

tfpoJtHtn House lad. Manufacturing 

Salesroom 

Malntename of Industries Opor. 

Maintenance of Industries Mfg. 

Sight Searing Classes for Children 



61,559. 10 

26,338.98 

371.551.5* 

23.944.06 

24,205,24 

6l.5S9.93 
10,267.35 
3M29.82 

24.0S8.S6 

25.997-7* 
I6S.332.I8 

18,452.58 



$•51,177.7* 



Istess* 



4113-01 Administration 

4113-02 Aid to Blind 

Befunds to Prior Yra. 



16,049.18 
307.258.25 

359-75 



$323,667.1* 



taMff#*qres 

4L13-01 
4113-02 



Administration 
Aid to Blind 



16.264.72 



$311,844.72 



KEPQHT OF THE DIVISION OF PUBLIC LEBBARIES 83 

July 1, 19ht to June 30, 19h7 

OUTLIHE OF ACTIVITIES 

Field AcUvlties 

ll*8 Advisory visits to public libraries 
66 Advisory visits to school libraries and school officials 
7 Visits to hospitals and the U. S. Maritime Academy , Hyannis. 
2*21 Total 

U Trustees' meetings attended by request. 

h Surveys (comprehensive) covering k public libraries* 

1 Survey of local library service made as part of a school survey 
of the Department of Education. 

3 Libraries reorganized - 2 by librarians secured by the Division 
and supervised by it; 1 by the Division's staff* 

39 Speeches made to such organisations asi library clubs, conferences 
of principals and superintendents, Massachusetts Parent-Teacher 
Association groups, Simmons College, High School guidance forums, etc* 

£U Meetings attended, Including general meetings and committee meetings 
of library groups , school groups, Massachusetts Parent-Teacher Associa- 
tion and local units, Massachusetts United Nations, Treasure Chest, 
Books Across the Sea, East & West Association, etc* 

1 Summer Institute, July 29-August 22, organised and administered by 
the Division aid held at Simmons College* Attendance 33* 

5 Exhibits arranged* Books and a staff member were sent to the annual 
conference of *tate Recreation Workers, University of Massachusetts, 
and the Art Institute for Elementary School Principals, Massachusetts 
School of Art; materials on the school library were assembled and dis- 
played for the school groups of the New England School Library 
Association Conference; a bookmobile was exhibited at the Conference 
of Supervisors of Adult Civic Education, /at the Farm and Home Conference* 

Office Activities 

Statistical blank printed and distributed to public libraries and 
tabulations made from returns* 

Supplementary statistical blank distributed to secure current data* 

Postcard questionnaire sent to school libraries; tabulations made 
from returns* 

88 Comparative statistical tables covering income, salaries, circula- 
tion, etc*, as wall as data on vacations, sick leave, etc*, 
compiled on request* 

lU Positions filled through the placement film 1 . 



- 2 - 



84 



19U6 Supplement to the Hate Certificate Reading List compiled 
and distributed to libraries and schools. 

21,932 Certificates awarded. 

Leaflet on Division's services revised and printed in new, modern 
form for use with librarians and trustees. 

2 . Mews Letters covering the Division's activities and general 
library news edited and distributed. 

10 Monthly Selected Book Buying Lists for small libraries compiled 
and distributed to public libraries and school libraries 
(omitted July and August). 

6% Bibliographies compiled for the radio programs of the Department 
of Education. 

22 Special bibliographies compiled for librarians, teachers, parents, 
on request. 

2 Articles appeared in professional publications. An article on 
"Library Pr ogre ss in Massachusetts" written by the Library Adviser 
appeared in/*fiibrary Journal", and an article written by the Consultant 
School libraries and Work with Children & Young People, on her work as 
State Consultant appeared in the American Library Association "Top of 
the Mews". 

3 Radio series arranged and sponsored. 

5 Individual broadcasts by staff members. 

10 Speakers on libraries and library services suggested for meetings 
of library clubs, schools, Massachusetts Parent-Teacher Associa- 
tion groups, and teachers' dubs. 

Files of material in the field of education have been drawn on 
heavily by school officials throughout the state, as well as by 
supervisors within the Department. 

Cooperation with the Department's Summer School activities involved 
supplying 1,00$ books; 900 for Ryannis State Teachers College, 60 for 
North Adams State Teachers College, U5 for Fitchburg State Teachers 
College. 

The Division's central Lending Library lent to libraries, schools, and 
school officials the following books and other materials t 

21,016 Books 

106 Books Across the Sea 
IB Posters 
U76 Pictures 
Recordings 
Total 



U76 
51^20 



1,23U Books not owned by the Division were borrowed on Interlibrary loan to 
fill the needs of requesting libraries. 









m 



[i 



-3 - 

the Division's three bookmobiles circulated the following books and 
other materials in three rural areas of the state t 



85 



129*253 Books 

51 Pamphlets 
5,6&8 Pictures 

h& Posters 

13U,99U Total 

157»8U8 Grand total of books and materials lent. 

Even a cursory examination of the activities of the Division of Public 
Libraries listed above indicates that the Division's work is extremely 
intensive and varied, and that a great deal is being carried by a small 
staff of professional and clerical people. In order to carry it at all 
each staff member is working under pressure all the time. 

In I9I169 there were many changes in personnel due to the fact that the 
salaries paid the Division's professional staff are lower than the national 
standard for librarians. The Reference Librarian resigned to accept a 
position at the Baker Library, Harvard University} the Bookmobile Librarian 
in the Pittsfield region went to a similar position in Vermont because the 
Division's librarians receive a salary of $20ltO-2UOO while Vermont's receive 
$2^00-3000. The Bookmobile Librarian in Greenfield and the Chief of the 
Division's Lending Library accepted positions with the Veterans' Administra- 
tion at increases of $600. Zt was very difficult to replace these professional 
people, and in each instance there was some delay before the positions they 
held were filled. 

A complete reclassification of the Division's professional staff is needed. 
The Bivision of Public Libraries must meet the salary standards established 
by the library profession. If it does not do so, it cannot hope to build 
up and maintain a competent staff, and moreover, its position will have a 
depressing effect on library standards in the state. 

Work is increasing in all areas. The number of books lent from the lending 
library increased 2$% over 19U5-U6. An assistant in the lending library is 
badly needed, as well as a larger appropriation for books and binding. The 
three bookmobiles have now been in operation seven years. Business has in- 
creased steadily so that it is imperative to have a full time clerical assist- 
ant in each office. The bookmobiles have never been replaced and it has been 
difficult to keep them in constant operation during the past year. Their 
replacement must now be faced. 

As a State Agency the Division has the opportunity and the obligation to 
spread the gospel about library needs and library services through close 
cooperation with state-wide organizations. It works closely with the 
Massachusetts Library Association at all times. The Library Adviser is 
Chairman of its Personal Services Committee, a member of the Planning 
Committee, and a member ex-officio of the Standards Commit tee. The 
Oeneral Secretary is Secretary of the Association and a member of its Public 
Relations Committee. The Division's offices are frequently used for meetings 
of various committees. The Division coopers tee with civic and educational 
groups wishing to reach the libraries of the state, not only by providing 
liete of libraries, but frequently by addressing envelopes on the addreaso- 
graph machine, as it has recently done 4>r the Rational Conference of Christians 
and Jews and the New England Library Association • It has been closely 

connected with the Massachusetts Parent-Teacher Association during the last 



year since the Library Adviser was made a member of the Board of Managers 
and is serving as Chairman of the Reading and Library Service Committee. 
The Massachusetts Parent-Teacher Association and the Division are cooperat- 
ing in bringing out a reading list for parents, and with other groups are 
planning to sponsor an adult reading program. 

The Division has been able to sponsor several excellent radio series under 
the direction of the Director, Office of Radio, Department of Education* 

The Massachusetts Library Aid Association, Inc., has been of tremendous 
assistance to the Division during the year. Its funds paid for the John 
Cronan story telling series, for the bibliography on "Home Building Plans* 
compiled by Miss Ruth Cook, Librarian, Architectural Library, harvard 
University, and for $200 worth of books for the small libraries of the state. 
At the close of the war the Association secured library furaitu e through 
Surplus Properties. During the year it distributed, through the Division, 
6 chairs, 1 catalog ease, 1 borrowers' card case, 1 large desk, 1 small desk, 
1 large display case, 1 small display case, 1 illuminated globe, to small 
libraries needing equipment. 

The movement for state aid for public libraries received tremendous impetus 
during the year. The Board of Free Public Library Commissioners and the 
staff of tie Division of Public Libraries have recognised the necessity for 
state aid for libraries for a long time. The Library Adviser spoke on state 
aid for libraries at an Institute on State Aid held in 19hk$ and many times at 
meetings of the Planning Committee of the Massachusetts Library Association. 
In the fall the Employees 1 Union of the Boston Public Library filed a Bill 
&05>, for state aid for libraries. The Bill based state aid on salaries only, 
and wouli havejbenefited some 69$ of the libraries of the state very little, 
if at all. Therefore, the Board of Free Public Library Commissioners stated 
at the Bill's hearing that they could not support SliOS>, but that they were 
unqualifiedly Interested in state aid for public libraries and hoped to see 
an over-all committee established to draw up a sound bill. 

In June, an over-all committee called the Conference on State Aid to 
Libraries In Massachusetts was formed, made up of representatives from the 
Division of Public Libraries, the Massachusetts Library As ociation, and 
the Employees 1 Union of the Boston Public Library. Milton E. Lord, Director, 
Boston Public Library, is Chairman. The Division is represented by Commissioner 
Desmond, Department of Education, Stacy B. Southworth, Chairman, Board of Free 
Public Library Commissioners, and Catharine M. lerxa, Library Adviser, 
Division of Public Libraries. 

All in all, 19U6-19U7 was an Interesting and preTitable year. The Division 
has attempted to fulfill its responsibilities in the most effeetlve manner 
pos ible. However, It looks to the time when, with Increased appropriation 
and a larger staff, it may enlarge the scope of its activities and influence. 



Bti 



TBACHSRS* RB3?IBBMBMT BOARD 



In accordance with the provisions of Section 16, Chapter 
15 of the General Laws, as amended by Section 4 of Chapter 656 
of the Ac fcs of 1945, the members of the Retirement System in 
Hovcmber 1946 reels c ced Mr. Harry Smalley of Fall Elver to 
serve on the Retirement Board for the term of two years from 
December 1, 1946* Mr. Smslley has been a member of the Board 
since 1914. 

Chapter 492 of the Acts of 1946 amended the Retirement 
Law so that now all teachers can receive credit for not more 
than the last ten years of service rendered in the public day 
schools of other states, irrespective of when the service was 
rendered. To receive credit for such service, it is necessary 
to pay the deductions which would have been paid if the service 
had been rendered in Massachusetts, with interest to date of 
payment. For service prior to July 1, 1914, the deductions re- 
quired are to be equal to the amount which the teacher would 
have paid if the teachers' retirement law in effect on July 1, 
1914 had been in effect at the time the service was rendered. 
Payment for such outside service must be amde either before 
January 1, 1961, or wi thin five years af ter becoming a member 
or date of reinstatement as a member. Credit will be allowed 
under the new law, with no additional payment required, for 
any service in other states for which credit was established 
prior to January 1, 1946, irrespective as to whether the 
service was rendered before or after July 1, 1914. 

From July 1, 1937 to December 31, 1946 deductions for the 
Retirement Fund could not be paid on salary in excess of &2600. 
Under the provisions of Chapter 636 of the Acts of 1946, a mem- 
ber whose salary was over $8600 at any time between July 1, 1937 
and December 31, 1945, may, at any time while in service, pay 
the deductions based on the salary received in excess of $2600 
with accumulated interest, and thereby receive upon retirement 
the retirement allowance credit for the period based on his full 
salary, without the £2600 limitation. 

Due to the Increased oost of living, the Legislature passed 
the following two acts increasing the pensions of certain teach- 
ers retired prior to January 1, 1946s 

1 - Chapter 418 of the Aots of 1946, which increased the 
minimum pension to such an amount that when added to the annuity 
under Option (a), it would provide a retirement allowance of 
$600 a year. The increase under this act took effeot on June 1, 
1946. There were 402 teachers affected, their annual retirement 
allowances being increased $53,244.72. 



ea 



2 - Chapter 559 of the Acta of 194b, which increased by 
20% the retirement allowances of teachers who were receiving 
less than #1000 and who did not receive an increase under the 
above-mentioned. Chapter 418, no increase, however, to result 
in an annual retirement allowance exceeding 01000. The in- 
crease under this act took effect on September 1, 1946 and 
there were 1055 teachers affected, their annual retirement al- 
lowances being increased $108, 988. 

There were 573 members who retired during the year and 
this is 302 more than the number of retirements during the prev- 
ious year* This large increase in the number of retirements was 
due to the more liberal benefits provided by the new law which 
took effeet on January 1, 1946, so that many teaoners retired 
who formerly did not feel they could afford to retire. The an- 
nual retirement allowances for the 573 new retired members amoun- 
ted to $829,784.96 and of this amount, f 2 10, 864. 44 was annuity 
derived froui the deductions and in terse t to the credit of the mem- 
bers at retirement and the balance, $618,920.52, was pension pay- 
able from State appropriations* On December 51, 1946 there were 
3,325 retired members living and their retirement allowances 
amounted to 13,676,794*72, of which #1,083,504*92 was annuity and 
$2,593,289.80 was pension payable from State appropriations. 






89 



STATEitEHT FOR THE YEAR EKDIKa DECEMBER 31, 1946 
MADE TO Yg "C0TSrisH0KKR OF IHgURANCS ST W* 

-Secretary of the teaches* ketiremeht'boar' 

fEACHKW itsumim kiiiikP.Y stoVifiis Fmnr 



Income 

Received from cities and towia as provided by 
Chapter 419, Acts of 1943 #105,771.61 

Interest received on investments (less #630.56 
accrued interest paid on securities purchased 
during year) 3,776.42 

Transferred from Annuity Savings Fund as pro- 
vided by Section 27(1) (c) 31.154.96 

Total #140,702.99 

Disbursements 

Transferred to Annuity Reserve Fund for Mem- 
bers retired 1,203.71 
Het decrease in book value of securities 30.49 

Total payments 1,234.20 

Income over disbursements #139,468.79 



Assets 

Investments, par value #223,000.00 

Amortised value #225,124.61 

Cash 52,620.19 

Accrued Interest on investments 515.62 
Due from the Commonwealth as provided by Section 

22 of Chapter 32 of the General Laws 1.471.24 

Gross Assets #279,531.56 

Liabilities 

Deposits and Interest to credit of cities and 
towns for payment of assessments of members who 
return from military service 73,541.66 

Assessments and Interest of members who have re- 
turned from military service 20 6.989.90 

Total liabilities #279,531.56 



90 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy 

July 1, 1<&6 - June 30, 1<&7 

The year under review presented several problems of policy 
of extreme importance to toe long-range program of the Academy* 
It is difficult to solve some of these problems Inasmuch as the 
relationship between this Academy and the federal Government, 
working through the U* S. Maritime Commission and Mavy Department, 
necessitates that some decisions of major importance are based 
upon and affected by, the action and policies o. these organiza- 
tions. 

The training vessel "Yankee States'* is an example of how 
seriously the action of the J* S* Maritime Commission can affect a 
state maritime academy* During tae preceding year the (?• 3* 
Maritime Commission cnan&ed its program for cruisin^ the state 
academy midshipmen, and informed us that we would have to iave our 
own s iip» ft© were also Informed that she only ships available to 
us were Navy hKA's. In consequence of this ultimatum the J33 
SEHOHA. (AKA-53) va3 turned over to the Maine Maritime academy, 
for tae Joint use of Kalne and Massachusetts* One joint cruise 
was made in this vessel, to *est Indies, Central and South American 
ports, during tae months or January* February and arch 1947* 
At the end of the cruise it was decided by the officials of the 
two academies that the "Yankee States" was not a suitable vessel 
for our purpose and it was turned back to the U* S* Maritime 
Commission* immediately after tie decision was made to return the 
training vessel "Yankee states" to the B* 3* Maritime Commission, 
the Cemmiss loners and Superintendent began a search for anot-ier 
vessel better suited to our needs* 

Tae 1%6 Coglelature enacted a bill giving authority to tue 
Commissioners to grant a Bachelor decree wien the curriculum was 
approved by the board of Colic i ate Authority* In connection 
with this act there were six new positions established to provide 
for personnel to teach t te academic subjects added to t ic pro i ram* 

Many candidates have been interviewed, and all avenues 
explored, in ax. effort to obtain men to fill these positions* 
Only turee peraonm have been found for t ese positions; te 
principal reason for lack of interest of candidates being tae 
inadequate salary in view of our twelve month pro. ram as a, alnst 
the usual academic year, and the additional duties required of an 
officer-instructor arising froa the -*cadeagr beln^ a military type 
school* r fhe salary question is of greatest concern to the 
Commissioners because or their inability to fill positions necessary 
to the establishment or the decree course in full* The delay will 
soon react adversely for our graduates in relation to the graduates 
of she ot ier State Maritime Academies and the federal Academy tUat 
are now on their decree courses* 

A new location for the -cade y is desired because or the 
wholly inadequate waterfront facilities at Hyannis* *uere is no 
possibility of providing berthing for a sea- ola training vessel 
at Hyannis* The Commissioners have inspected several sites on 
deep water, and have decided to bend all energies on Bus sards Ray* 



91 

Mass. Maritime *cadeny. 2. 7AA6-6/30A7 

The pure laae of laud adjoining to provide Tor the erection or some 
buildings and to prevent too close encroachment of otier activities, 
together with the fact that tie re are facilities already existing 
for berthing a training vessel will make this location a most 
desirable one for the academy* 

la the readjustment from the accelerated program of the war 
period, t ,ere were two classes graduated within a few weeks, one 
in February and one In May. This reduced tie midshipman complement 
to one class for a period of about two and one-half mentis. 

A curriculum based upon three years work and of such scope 
and level as to be considered adequate to the granting of a 
Bachelor degree by the Normals si oxters, was presented to the Board 
of Collegiate authority in «arcn* Certain Items of equipment 
which are necessary to Implement the degree course have not yet 
been obtained* It Is the Intention of the Board to move forward 
on tnese lines as rapidly as possible in order to get the decree 
course fully established* 

The Board of Commiss loners has adopted two new policies, 
one, concerning the admission of veterans, is of a somewhat 
temporary nature, wnile the need exists, and provides certain 
relaxation ox admission requirements other than hiose of an 
academic nature. The second provides for the admission of a small 
portion of eaeh entering class of qualified candidates who are not 
residents of Massachusetts, fhis Is In line with the policy of 
the other tate Maritime Academies, and the *J* 3. Maritime 
Commission* The Maritime Commission pays the per capita cost 
for out-of-state midshipmen* 

The academic work is progressing satisfactorily with the 
exceptions previously mentioned, and it is the earnest hope and 
desire or tue Commissioners fcamt most of the major problems 
now confronting them will be resolved within the ensuing year. 

The Commissioners appreciate the cooperation of all members 
of the staff, w io are working under somewhat difficult conditions, 
and express taelr thanks to them* re also thank the officials 
of the Department of Education for taelr advice and assistance 
on many occasions* 



12 



BRADFORD DURFEE TECHHICAL INSTITUTE 

Principal' a Report 
1946-1947 



Courses of Ins true Hon 

Our day diploma courses are still grouped in the fields 
of Engineering, Science and Textiles* The sane part-time 
oourses in textiles were given as heretofore in the Art Depart- 
ment. The Chemistry Department continues to offer the special 
courses for student nurses from the hospitals. There were no 
changes made in the course designations. The faculty has spent 
considerable time in studying our curricula keeping in mind the 
fact that we are expanding our three-year diploma courses to 
four-year collegiate curricula leading to the E. S. degree. 
Obviously from now on any changes we may suggest must be ac- 
ceptable to the Board of Collegiate Authority. We hope to eon- 
elude this study early next year. 

This year we have conducted twenty-five oourses In our 
evening division. We did not offer a course in Diesel Engines 
because of lack of equipment. The registration in the follow- 
ing oourses was not sufficient to justify our giving them this 
years vis., Dyeing. Fancy Loom Fixing, Weaving and Shop Mathe- 
matics. They are usually in demand so we shall expect to offer 
them next year. 

Perhaps the outstanding contribution of our evening Divi- 
sion to industry was the instruction in loom fixing. One of the 
bottlenecks of the textile Industry has been the soarcity of 



trained loomflxers. 
no textile plant can 
the year Mr. Charles 
fixers' Union, asked 
We were able to work 



Without these highly skilled craft workers 
function effectively. At the beginning of 
Mull ins, Secretary- Treasurer of the Loom- 
our help in alleviating this situation, 
out a plan by which our Industrial Exten- 
sion classes were run both morning and evenings to accomodate 
men working on different shifts. Thus we were able to offer 
this much needed instruction. 

It was necessary to bring in additional instructors to aug- 
ment our regular staff. Here again Mr. Mulllns was very helpful. 
He recommended to us men who were actually working in the mills 
as loomflxers and who also had the ability to teaoh. It is a 
pleasure to acknowledge the friendly and cooperative manner in 
which he and his union lias worked wi th us on this project. We 
have trained 95 loomflxers during the year. Many of these have 
become sufficiently adept so that they have won their union card. 
We expect that there will be a demand for this course again next 
year. 

We have again enjoyed a substantial increase in both our 
regular day and evening enrollment. It is Indeed very encour- 
aging to note the sustained Interest on our Industrial extension, 
courses. These are evening courses free to residents of Massachu- 
setts. Our enrollment statistics are given in the following taMoat 



93 







Enrollment Statistics 










Rag, 
65 


Mi 

IS 

Spec. To tal 


I 


Industrial Extern 
Evening Morning Total 
566 50 595 


jion 
Grand 

Total 


1945*46 


118 177 


772 


1946-47 


117» 


75*# 190 




600 


71 


671 


861 


Avar. 10 yrs. 
1930-1939 


82 


48 150 




641 


125 


764 


894 



eThis figure Includes 75 veterans 

♦*This figure includes 17 student nurses from the Union Hospital 
and 9 student nurses from St. Anne* a Hospital 

Table II 

Break -down of Day Studen ts— 1946-1947 



1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. To mis 



piploaa Courses 

Textile Manufacturing 

Course 1 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Course 2 

Engineering Course 5 

Certificate Courses 

Textile Tech. Course 1C* 
Freehand Drawing and 

Painting 2C 

Fashion and Costume 

Illus. 50 

Chemistry for Student 

Nurses 
Special in Print Design 



•This oourse le a two-year certificate course. 

Table III 
Break-down of Veterana Only - 1946-1947 



25 


f 


u 


52 


25 

56 


6 
11 


4 


53 
47 


$ 


m 


m 


5 


mm 


m» 


tm 


51 


«» 


m 


- 


14 


• 


m 


«• 


26 
2 



Diploma Courses 


1st yr. 


2nd yr. 


3rd 


yr. 


Totals 


Textile MarWao curing 












Courae 1 


14 


4 


1 




19 


Chemistry and Dyeing 












Oourse 2 


14 


6 


em 




19 


Engineering Course 5 


24 


9 


em 




55 


Certificate Courses 












Textile Teohnloal 












Course 1C 


2 


m 


- 




2 
TO 






Table III 
Break-down of Day Students by Residence 



Massachusc tts 

Veteran 



Hon- veteran 
34 



60 



Out-of-State 
£on-ve tfcrun Veteran 
5 13 



Foreign* 



Totals 



117 



«Slx foreign countries were represented! 

China 1) Egypt 1; Greece 2; Haiti 1; Peru 1; Turkey 1. 
the foreign students are taking textile courses. 

Table IV 

Evening School Statistics - 1946-47 

The following gives the registration and residence of 
evening and raornlng school students} 



All 



Fall River 


845 


Portsmouth 


1 


Assonet 


1 


Baynham Centre 


1 


Berkley 


2 


Somerset 


36 


Bristol 


1 


Somerset Centre 


4 


Ocean Grove 


i 


S tough ton 


1 


Newport 


i 


Swansea 


18 


Ho. Attleborough 


3 


Taunton 


23 


No. Westport 


9 


Tiverton 


10 


Paw tucket 


1 


Warren 


3 



Total 



968 









Proa the above registration 600 attended classes in either 
the evening or morning sessions. Mo student had his name placed 
on the register until he had been in attendance at leaot three 
times. A number of these students took more than one course dur- 
ing the year. In giving uhe following list of students by class- 
es, a student taking more than one subjeot is counted in each 
class for which he is enrolled. 

Algebra and Trigonometry 22 

Blueprint Reading 5 
Design and Cloth Analysis 
Draper Fixing I 

Draper Fixing II 27 

Drawing and Roving Frames 6 

Else Urol ty 44 

Electronics 16 

Fashion and Costume Illustrating 36 

Freehand Drawing 66 

General Chemistry I 27 

General Chemistry II 12 

Jaoquard Designing 1 

Machine Shop 114 

Mechanical Drawing 41 

Picking and Carding 23 

Plain Weaving 8 



_ 



List of students by classes continued! 






Qualitative Analysis 2 
Qualitative Analysis XI 
Quantitative Analysis 
Shop Mathematics 
Slide Rule 

Steam Boilers and Engines 
Textile Chemistry 
Welding 



6 
8 
5 

4 

4 

16 

16 

49 

W5 



Table V 
Graduation Statistics 



1945-46 
1946-47 



Day Division Evening Division 
Diploma s Certificates Diplom as Certificates Totals 
-"*-! 61 8 123 "TO— 



6 



34 






Aver* 10 yre* 
1930-1939 29 



12 



36 



191 



309 



243 



383 



Motes- The number of Day diplomas reflects the effect of 
the war years* 

Day certificates are given for the completion of 
special day courses. 

An evening diploma Is given for satisfactory com- 
pletion of four courses in a single department* 

An evening certificate is given for the satisfac- 
tory completion of a 26-week course or for two 13- 
week courses* 

Relative to our tuition races, after considerable delay the 
veterans 1 administration accepted the adjusted basis for tuition 
at #10*32 per credit hour per semester* This is figured on our 
costs lass administration expense. Thus each veteran in the 
sohool this year paid the State a tuition of £412*80 for the 40 
credit hours a student can earn per year* Previously they had 
paid 50s 7 per oredit hour or C20.00 per year. Since our per 
pupil cost is approximately $500 including administra -ion ex- 
pense this new rate is much more equitable. 

Instruction Staff 

At the beginnings of the year, with the approval of the 
board of Trustees, the following men were added to the Instruc- 
tion Staff* 






Robert Chare tte, one of our own graduates, as assistant 
instructor In Machine Shop practice and Mechanical Drawing. 

Albert A. Stewart, B. 8. (M. I.T. ) Instructor in Physics. 

Louis J. Simeone, B. S. (northeastern) Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Hugene R. Williams, B. S. (northeastern) Instructor in 
Chemical Engineering. 

We still have two permanent positions vacant, vis. 

(1) Head Textile School Instructor in charge of Chemistry 
and Dyeing. 

(8) Textile School Instructor in textile subjects. 

Dr. John 8. Lyons who was to have been in charge of our 
chemistry and dyeing courses, resigned to accept an assistant 
professorship at Dartmouth College. To date his successor lias 
not been named. 

Mr. Lucien Sohimpf who has been in charge of our Art work 
for the ijast 33 years also resigned effective September 1. Mr. 
Sohimpf had reached the permissive retirement age and because of 
his health he felt he should resign. His resignation was ac- 
cepted by the Board of Trustees with deepest regret. His po- 
sition is one of the key positions in the school since in the 
Art and Textile Design Department all the style creations 
originate. Mr. Sohimpf enjoyed the confidence and respeot of 
both students and staff. It is with grea: regret that wo bid 
him godspeed. It will be very difficult to fill his place. 

As evening instructors in looafixing the following were added 
to our Industrial Extension Staff. 

Peter D. Behan Allen Hinoholiffe 

Isidore Level lie John D. Sousa 

Other additions to our personnel include Miss Graoe Packer as 
a junior clerk on a temporary appointment and Mr. John Drlsooll 
as fireman- janitor on a permanent appointment replacing Michael 
Kennedy re tired. 

We are however, still understaffed. It will be necessary to 
request at least seven additional Instructors (appointments to be 
effective September 1, 1948) in order to avoid impossible teach- 
ing loads. 

With the increasing pressure on the office force due to the 
complexity of the system of records used by both the state and 
veterans administration another clerk is definitely needeu in our 
office to relieve our treasurer. Miss Morgan of part of the book- 
keeping. 



, 



97 

Repairs and Renewals 

During the year we were able to oarry through eeveral 
vitally needed repair projects. 

(1) Tar and gravel roof of the adialni strati on building was 
replaced wish a new 20 year bonded roof of the same typo. This 
contract was awarded by the Trustees to %a. Arohard & Son of 
Fall River. Necessary repairs to the gutters and flashings were 
made at the same time. 

(2) The jfalls of this same building were repointed and 
waterproofed by the A. 0. Horn Co. of New York, all windows and 
doors being thoroughly caulked. Thus for the first tine for a 
good many years we have a building which does no t leak. 

(5) Both the interior and exterior of the dye house were 
repainted. This building also was completely reroofed wl th a 
20 year bonded tar and gravel roof. 

(4) Reinhardt Signs supplied us with a new sign lettered in 
accordance with our revised name. It became legal for us to use 
the name Bradford Durfee Technical Institute on August 1, 1946. 

(5) 'The second floor locker room located adjacent to the 
women* s facilities was converted to a women's lounge. It was 
furnished with cafeteria tables, chairs, and settees. Hereto- 
fore, our girls have had no room of this kind for their own use* 

(6) The repainting of the halls and stairways, begun in 
1945 was completed. Other painting included two classrooms- 
No. 11 and 27. 

(7) Finally, the old and threadbare oarpet in the Princi- 
pal's office was replaced with asphalt tile* 

I am glad to report that this long range renovation pro- 
gram can be continued. The General Court has appropriated suf- 
ficient funds to roroof our remaining buildings and do the neces- 
sary remedial waterproofing of their exterior surface. This 
program is costing us a considerable amount right now because of 
the fact that all of our buildings have been sadly negleoted for 
years. When they are once more in shape a very nominal appropria- 
tion each year will serve to keep them in such a condition that 
we will be proud to show visitors about. 

Legislative Matters 

this year we had two bills before the legislature in con- 
nection with our expansion progrum. The first, Senate Bill No. 
62, provided for the appropriation of $200,000 "to construct 
additions and oaks alterations and repairs." The Second, House 
Bill No. 1614, provided that "the Bradford Durfee Teohlnoal In- 
stitute shall be maintained by the Commonwealth for the purpose 



of giving instruction la the theory and practical art of en- 
gineering, science and textiles ana kindred branches of in- 
dustry." Also that the board of trustees "may grant the degree 
of bachelor of science or other appropriate degrees. • • • if 
and so lon& as the faculty, equipment and courses of instruction 
at such Institute meet with the approval of the board of colle- 
gia te authority." 

Thanks to the solid backing of our local legislators, our 
civic, labor (both A* F. of L. and 0. I. 0.) and management 
organizations, our alumni and the press we were successful in 
having both of these bills become law. It is a pleasure to ex- 
press our appreciation of the support and approval given our 
efforts by these groups* 

Both of these bills were essential for the long range plans 
for the Institute. The first should make it posaible for us to 
erect a solenee ana gymnasium building wnich would relieve our 
crowded and unsatisfactory conditions. Without going too far in- 
to details of the situation, it should be pointed out that at 
present we Lave only two laboratories for ohemlstry. It is there- 
fore neoe'saary to house in ono laboratory qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis, technical analysis, organic and physical chemis- 
try all in a laboratory with a working capacity of appropriately 
20 students. 1 em certain that all chemists will agree that the 
very nature of the work requires that each of these courses should 
be housed in its own separate laboratory. This means then that 
our science building shoula provic.e four additional laboratories 
each with an average working capacity of 40 students. 

Our instructors are called on every year to assist industry 
in solving their development problems, yet we have in our whole 
physioal set-up not one room that is available to an instructor 
for such work. Research problems shoula be studied apart from 
the student body. 

The situation in our Engineering department is equally 
serious, in one small poorly-lighted basement room we house our 
electrical, steam, dlesel and industrial electronics laboratories. 
Hero again tuoh of these courses should have its own soparate 
facilities. We have but one drafting room with a capacity of 35. 
We need another with twice that oapacity. 

We have no laboratories at all for hydraulics, communica- 
tions and strength of ma te rials— three very important engineer- 
ing subjects. We also lack the neeessary private offices for 
instructors and classroom space. 

In brief, our present plant has a rated capacity of 220* 
This year with virtually only two classes in attendance wo have 
an enrollment of 225, exclusive of the evening students. When 



99 



we have all four classes in attendance our enrollment should be 
350-400. Our estimate for September, 1948, is at least 300. 
Obviously the situation is critical. Ws laust have additional 
facilities or we shall be obliged to deny admission to may appli- 
cants. 

The second bill authorises us to grant degrees. Hie only 
proviso being that our facilities must m'e „ the approval of the 
board of collegiate authority. The principal is entirely in ac- 
cord with this provision. It of course means that the qualifi- 
cations of future staff members must be scrutinised very care- 
fully and selected for reasons of experience and academic back- 
ground which will meet collegiate standards. 

New Equipment 

During the year orders have been placed against our special 
appropriation to the amount of (27,868.75. Included in these 
purchases were e Draper looms) 1 C romp ton Knowled loom; 1 Venango 
raws took and package dyeing machine ; 1 Smith-Drum package dyeing 
machine; 1 Riggs & Lombard piece dyeing machine; 1 Belger roving 
tester and 1 Saoo-Lowell sliver tester. Four new laboratory units 
were also ordered for our dye laboratory. We expect delivery of 
this equipment not later than the first quarter of 1948. 

The balance of the appropriations will be encumbered as soon 
as we can get the machinery builders to accept additional orders. 
These commitments will cover our needs in the carding and spin- 
ning departments and also in the warp preparation department. We 
are waiting quotations from the ihltin Machine Go. on much of this 
equipment* 

When this equipment is in operation we expect to have one of 
the finest equipped textile departments in any textile school in 
America. 

We have already received our est! ate of the cost of instal- 
lation of a thoroughly modern air-conditioned textile testing 
laboratory. This matter will be laid before the board of trustees 
for their approval of contracts as soon as the required number of 
bids have been submitted. Our present facilities do not permit 
of the degree of control necessary if our work is to be comparable 
with that done by other testing laboratories. 



Looking Ahead 

This year we will give each entering student two coopera- 
tive Tests put out by the American Council on Education. 

(1) Cooperative English Test; A- Mechanics of Expression 
form T. 

(2) Cooperative G-nerul Achievement Tests (Revised series) 
III A Test of neral Proficiency in the Field of 
Mathematics. 



In the past we have had several unfortunate experience* 
with students who were found to be displaced in courses they 
vers taking. It is felt that the aeoummulation of data from 
such tests as these oan be used as the years go by as a guide 
to prevent similar experiences. The fact that our students 
come with quite a wide variation in their preparation would 
seem to make this experiment worth while. Nearly all of our 
courses depend on a knowledge of mathematics beyond arithmetic. 
Thus it is very important that we know as early as possible any 
necessity for remedial work in this field* 

Our English course here is largely gramnar, choioe of words, 
technical report writing, and public speaking. It is possible 
that by a proper choice of achievement tests we might determine 
that a student could be given advance credit for at least a part 
of our freshman English. 

We have yet to deoide what we should do about a foreign 
language or languages in such a school as ours. Recent surveys 
would seem to indicate that for students of science German is 
still very desirable. Possibly Spanish might be In order for 
those specialising in textiles. The activity in textiles in 
the countries to the south of us is very significant. X make no 
recommendation at this time. The whole question is under study 
by our staff* 

It Is quite possible that there may be in industry In this 
area a considerable number of aen and women who completed their 
high school course but were unable to take the technical courses 
which would be so helpful in advancing to the better positions in 
industry* I have asked our staff to give thought to the possibil- 
ity of setting up an integrated evening school curricula on the 
college level thai would offer the opportunity for such workers 
to earn college credits at our Institute toward a technical degree. 
They might even be able to earn such a degree over a period of 
from six to eight years of study. Certainly a program of this 
type would strengthen our industrial extension work. At a later 
time I shall lope to present a more detailed disuusslon of this 
topic 

At this writing we have already accepted our full quota of 
freshman students. There are still some vaoanolss in our upper 
classes which continue to feel the effect of the war years. The 
registration of veterans is running about 80 percent or 13 per* 
cent less than last year. The increase in interest, however, of 
the recent high school graduate is most encouraging. The caliber 
of student applying, insofar as it can be judged by preparatory 
school records, is definitely above ttia t in the past. This is as 
it should be now that our new entrance requirements in terms of 
15 units are in force. However, neither the raising of our 
scholastic standards nor the increase in tuition rates has, as 
far as we oan see, operated adversely on our enrollment* 



lOi 



"There la still much to be done to oonsple te our expansion 
program. Our library has yet to be built up to the requirements 
of a oollege teobnloal library. In this connection we have ap- 
plied to War Surplus for a selected list of 3500 volumes divided 
between Chemistry, English, Engineering Subjeots, History, Mathe- 
matics, and Physios. Should we be successful in our application 
to share in this donation program, it would go a long way toward 
filling our needs. 

We feel, however, that our plans are progressing very well, 
and that within the year we should be able to present for the ap- 
proval of the Board of Collegiate Authority* 

(1) A properly trained and adequate instruction staff; 

(2) A suitable library) 

(2) A properly balanced curricula; 
(4) An adequate physical plant. 

This last will require all the cooperation of our friends. 
The state has appropriated #200,000 toward the project. I have 
repeatedly stated from the first the t it will cost including 
equipment approximately #400,000 to provide us the additional 
facilities for the regular full-time student body of 400 which 
figure I estinmte will be reached by the fall of 1949. I feel, 
however, that the public Interest in the Institute is so strong 
that our goal can be realized if a properly conducted campaign 
is conducted among our alumni and our friends in Indus cry. 






)2 



LOttELL fSSSlLS IB8TITBTB 

Lowell, Keesachusetts 

Part X # Annual Bcport 
for the year ending 
June 30, 1947 

The Trustee* of tbe Lowell Textile Institute make the following report 
covering the year ending June 30, 1947 upon those subjects as specified in 
tile Statutes. 

The Lowell Textile Institute is continuing to grow, both in oiso sad 
usefulness to the textile sad allied industries. To meet the challenge posed 
qjr the unprecedented demand for entrance on the part of Freshman applicants 
as veil as an awakened interest of the textile Industry for technically 
trained personnel, many changes here been aadc in curriculun and plant layout. 
Xn the case of too former, the Faculty Cosmlttee on Curriculun hat node a 
careful study of our course' content and has introduced new courses in Human- 
ities and general education. This has been accompanied by a consolidation of 
our regular curriculum to minimise duplication and out-noded subject matter. 
Row laboratories hare boon built and a "stagger 1 ' system has been adopted to 
accommodate the large student body. It is by such means that the Board of 
trustees and Faculty are leering to scire our application problem and provide 
the martmum opportunity for deserving students* 



In the last annual report for this Institute, reference was made to the 
Lowell Textile Institute Building Association. This group has boon instru- 
mental in the construction of our first dormitory which is scheduled for com- 
pletion in December of 1947* During the past year, the association was 
granted power to borrow additional funds for the construction of the second 
dormitory and work has been started on this unit as well. The building sched- 
ule calls for completion in August of 1948* It Is obvious that such facilities 
will greatly enhance our educational program providing for the first time, on- 
campus living quarters. 

The lew England textile industry is showing its support of textile edu- 
cation in a very concrete manner. The lew England Textile Foundation has 
come into being and has no Its program the raising of funds for the benefit 
of the four textile schools in low England, namely, Lowell Textile Institute, 
Bow Bedford Textile Institute, Bradford Burfoe Technical Institute, and the 
Rhode Island School of Design. Those funds are to be expended in three waysi 

fa) Textile scholarships 
b) Manufacturing equipment 
[c) Salary assistanos 

Over the past few years about $400,000 has been raised by the Foundation 
and it is planned to conduct yearly campaigns for $250,000 for at least the 
next three years. The Board of Trustees are grateful for this industrial gup- 
port and are encouraged in their efforts to enlarge the scope of our educational 



The day curriculum of the regular textile courses was continued on am 
educational grade which requires its students entering must be graduates of 
reesgnltsd high schools or ether preparatory schools. Three depa rtm e n ts offer 
four-year courses leading to bachelor degrees, vis., the Chemistry and Textile 



1QV2LL fJKJXLt IMSTXTOTE Pegs 2 

Part I * Annual Report 
for the year sa d jaa , 
June 30, 1947 

Coloring Department grants the degree of Bachelor of Selectee la textile 
Chemistry, the BaglEwsaring Department offers the degree of Bachelor of 

■■w-s* ^^e*»a*' ^m *m^e •» ^^iip" *F**»Ow^e iMj^^seM^SfrQ^s^mT^c* ***— ""lOa s ^^^i»*ie mv ut *f ♦ ^r^F ^^* ^mo«*y oj **ma^v ^^W"*"aw^*»e* ^w^»» ^•ts*'* «ejeHie& 

Department* of f era* four year program leading to a Bachelor of Science do* 
gree in Textile Manufacturing* There are various options crallahlo for 
several fields of specialisation, ouch as mechanical engineering, merchan- 
dising and sales, fabric design, etc. The Chemistry and Engineering Depart- 
ments offer post-graduate courses leading to a degree of Master of Science 
la their respective fields* 

The evening courses ore organised to moot the requirements of those who 
are working during the daytime sad are some forty la number requiring from 
one to three years to finish. These courses cover such subjects as farm 
Manufacturing, Designing, Heaving, finishing, Chemistry sad Dyeing, Freehand 
sad Mooftanloal Drawing, Mathematics, Sngiish, Industrial Psychology, sad a 
variety of Engineering subjects. This entire curriculum is going studied 
with too intent to award di plo m as equivalent to our former three-year day 
school progr am as veil as to allow degree credit la oar regular day school. 

The total registration as of June 30, 1946 was 292 whereas total enroll- 
ment as of June 30, 1947 was 4*4* Of these 295 were from Massachusetts, 29 
from the remaining few Bagland states, 105 from other states, sad 55 Area 
outside of the United States* 

At the Commencement la June 1947 there wore conferred 15 Master of 
Science degrees, 35 Bachelor of Science degrees, sad 5 diplomas la panufao- 
taring* 

The registration for the Sreaiag School for the year ending lane 30, 
1947 was lltl which compares with 594 for too year ending June 30, 1946* 
Of the above number Tit wore from Lowell, 215 from Lawrence aad vicinity, 
187 from other cities aad towns, aad 61 from low Hampshire. Upon the com- 
pletion of the courses, 1*3 certificates were awarded* 

The teaching staff as of June 30, 1947 consisted of seven prof ossosa 
as Department Heads, twenty assistant professors, nineteen Instructors, aad 
oae assistant instructor, totaling forty-eight full time staff members* 
Thirty-three of oar ova teaching staff taught la the Srenlng School, aad 
this naaber mas sagaeatod by seventeen outside Instructors* 



The buildings of the Institute are four la naaber and are located to 
fora a quadrangls. They are interconnected aad supplied by Boat aad sowar 
from a plant connected by tunael to the other ball dings* They are all of 
Slav burning construction faced with yellow brick en the outside aad 
thoroughly sprlnklered. all of the buildings have two floors aad basement, 
aad two have la addition a third floor* 

The •sard of Trustees is continuing to plan for the future of the Lowell 
Textile Institute. Their efforts have received the support of the industry 
which this Institute servos* Further, the Alumni Association has taken as 
its project the solicitation of funds for a new Alumni Library* At the 
Golden Anniversary Alumni oelebratlon held in April of 1947, the Alumni 

pledged over half the cost of the now Library, and this appeal is just now 
taking on formal proc edures. Plant are being studied for oar projected 
lag! soaring aad Administration buildings* All of this points toward a mors 
active and dynamic program seeking to moot the c h a ll e n ge presented textile 
sdmostlonsl Institutions. 



04 



HEW BEDFCRD TEXTILE IHSTITUTE 

Enrollment for the school year 19lj.6-V? was 2lj.8j faculty 17s 
diploma and certificate courses given. 

A professional and technical institute which has as 
its purpose training in the fundamentals of the textile 
industry— training young men and women to think for them- 
selves about problems of the second largest industry in the 
United States. 

The manufacture of modern fabrics requires knowledge 
of the various fibers, blends of fibers, types of finish, 
etc. Training is given in textile, chemical and mechanical 
enginderlng, physics and mathematics, knit goods manufactu- 
ring and time study. Machine and laboratory equipment is 
constantly being installed with the desire to keep the 
institute up to date. The graduates of the Institute are 
engaged In all branches of the textile fields buyers, 
salesmen and saleswomen, laboratory technicians, industrial 
managers, business executives, promoters, etc. 



105 



DIVISIQIi OF VOCATIONAL EVOCATION 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATIOH 
OAT SCHOOLS ABD DEEARTlfSHTS 



enrollments each year since the termination of hostil- 
ities have increased, reaohing a level this year of only 16.4 per- 
cent below pre-war totals. Pupils from 190 of the 561 towns and 
cities in Massachusetts are receiving instruction in the twenty-four 
training centers. 

The State supervisor assisted local school administrators 
in five communities in the natter of conducting surreys and inter- 
preting need for agricultural education. It is anticipated that 
three of these centers will establish training programs when con- 
struction costs moderate. In two other communities the State super- 
visor assisted the Assistant Director of the Vocational Division 
in the matter of the proposed establishment of General Trade and 
Industrial departments resulting in the establishment of suoh train - 
ing in one of these centers. 

As an outgrowth of a farm mechanics study and report* 
several high school departments have increased farm mechanics 
instruction to 26 peroent of the total agricultural program time. 
Full time farm mechanics instructors have been approved in two cen- 
ters. A new 2,100 sq. ft. brick farm mechanics shop at Hew Salem 
in operation this year allowed for a more adequate training program. 
At Deer field a new brick combination classroom and farm mechanics 
shop costing 125,000.00 operated this year with a full-time farm 
mechanics instructor employed. Plans for a new farm mechanics shop 
at Teapleton, to cost 120,000.00, have been completed. Suoh plans 
oall for the operation of this shop in 1948. Architectural plans 
have been developed for tfiddleboro to afford adequate farm mechanics 
shop facilities. Expansion of the farm meohanios shop quarters at 
Dartmouth, now under way, will afford an opportunity for training, 
also, in General Trade and Industrial skills. 

Supervised farm practioe has always been the core to 
effectual teaching and the successful establishment of our vocational 
agricultural pupils in agricultural occupations. In order to assist 
in reducing the percentage of withdrawals from the program before 
completion of training, oenters are now adopting the policy of 
requiring pre-entranoe farm placement of candidates for admission 
who oome from non-farm homes. 



Placement and successful establishment has been the aim 
and fundamental motive of vocational agricultural education in this 
Commonwealth. On account of the praotioe of follow-up of all former 
pupils, instructors have assisted greatly in the matter of their 
successful establishment in farming. Returning veterans have been 
assisted in continuing their training and re-establishing themselves 
in farming. 



06 



Again this year the Stat* l>epartaent of Agriculture recog- 
nised by a Certificate of Merit Award the accomplishments of a voca- 
tional agrieultural graduate. This award for "Outstanding Accomplish- 
ment" went to Kenneth Fooe MeCully who ie owner and operator of Sim 
Carnation Company, Incorporated, Saugus, Massachusetts. 

Mr. MeCully was born August 22, 1902, in Fitohburg, Massa- 
chusetts. In 1921 he was graduated from the Norfolk County Agricul- 
tural School, returning as a post-graduate student the following 
year. During 1928-1925, he attended a Theological school but was 
forced to give up much training because of ill health. 

From 1926 to 1955 he was in charge of two plantations 
of about 10,000 acres of sugar cane and several thousand acres 
of pasture and woodland owned by the United "ruit Company in Cuba. 
During the harvest seasons, he had direct supervision of several 
thousand men. Due to local revolutions, he returned to Massachusetts 
in 1955 and accepted the Superintendency of Sim Carnation Company, 
Incorporated, of Saugus. 

In 1944 he purchased the business which involved 17 acres 
of land with 100,000 feet under glass. He now employs thirty-five 
(55) persons in the propagation of 1,760,000 carnation plants, 
50,000 chrysanthemum plants, 55,000 iris plants, 60,000 stock plants 
and 25,000 snapdragon plants. Annually, he ships 1,500,000 carna- 
tion plants throughout the United States and foreign countries. 
Over 1,000,000 carnations are cut and sold from his own houses each 
year. Sinoe 1940 his business has more than doubled. His progress 
throughout the depression and tforld War II has been fast and 
financially sound as he turned a hasardous wartime business into a 
profitable enterprise. 

As a plant breeder, he has originated many new carnation 
varieties. His carnations have been consistent blue-ribbon winners 
at Massachusetts Horticultural Shows. 

Fvening Schools 

Fifteen centers operated evening schools this year with 
a total enrollment of 447. Faeh center organised non-assembled 
unit courses to train veterans who desired to establish themselves 
in agrieultural occupations. 

The following Assembled Unit (our see were also in operation 
in 1946-19471 

Bristol County School - Dairy Laboratory Praotioes, 

Farm Machinery Repair, Floriculture, 
Market Oardening, Poultry Improved 
Praotioes, and Poultry Problems. 



S 



Essex County School - Dairy Laboratory Practices (2), 

Bono Ground! Improvement (4), 
Increasing J&lk Production and 
Poultry Husbandry. 

Norfolk County School - Far* Machinery Repair. 

Templet on - Poultry Flock Management and 

Improved Practices In Genera} 
Faming. 



Agricultural Teacher-Training 

Intr o duction * In June, 1947, the nana of the institution respon- 
sible for the administration of Agricultural Teacher -training, 
Massachusetts State College, waa changed to "University of 
Massachusetts" • Without a doubt, the move greatly influenced a 
tremendous growth In enrollment and facilities. Aa of September 
15, 1947, 4200 hare been admitted at both the main lnatltution 
and its branch at Fort Devena. St la anticipated that soma 
reorganisation of the aehoola and departments will result but 
to date none ha a been announced* 

Hugh P. Baker, President for thirteen years, retired 
as of July 1, 1947. No successor has yet been announced. 
Dr. Ralph A* Van lister. Dean of the School of Horticulture, is 
Aoting President* 

Pro-employment 'irainlng* During the college year of 
1946-1947, muoh greater interest has been shown by undergraduates 
toward training and qualifying for teaohing Vocational Agriculture. 
Our quota of four apprentice teachers were placed for training 
during the past school year. Three of these apprentice teachers 
were G* I, graduate students. Enrollment in the 1947 summer sohool 
courses in "ducetion 105 and 104 was large which indicates that 
agricultural teaohing is appealing to more individuals than in 
recent years. A total of ten newly qualified teachers of Vocational 
Agriculture were placed. One teaohing vacancy still exists with 
no qualified candidates available* 

A three-day Critic Teaoher-Training Conference, serrf.ng 
the North Atlantic Region, was arranged at the Deerfleld High 
School Agricultural Department on August 18, 19 and 20* The purpose 
of this conference was to upgrade crltlo teachers who train appren- 
tices for Vocational Agricultural Teaching. All regularly employed 
crltlo teachers were present, with one exception. The 17. 8* Of floe 
of Education agrees that no other projeot is so important as one 
which will I m pr o v e the teaohing of agriculture through better 
preparation of our apprentice teaohers. 



A collegiate chapter of the P* F. A* hat been organised 
at idle University of Massachusetts, with Irofessor Charles F. 
Oliver as Chapter Adviser. This chapter has been named the 
"Stimson-Heald* Collegiate Chapter in honor of two of the leading 
pioneers in Agricultural Education in the United States. All 
individuals who were former F. P. A, members of who are pre- 
paring to teach Vocational Agriculture are eligible for membership. 

For the past year, the Supervisor of Teacher-Training 
has been serving as Executive Secretary to the Massachusetts 
Association of Future Farmers of Amerioa. In addition, he has 
served as Secretary to the Massachusetts Veterans' Agricultural 
Advisory Committee which has held monthly meetings. Much assist- 
ance has been given toward developing the program of Institutional 
On-Fam Training* Exceptionally well-experienced teachers were 
found to meet all demands. Two training conferences were con- 
ducted for these teachers of Veteran Training and much individual 
assistance was provided each teacher* 

Ten issues of the Staff Letter have be*n prepared and 
distributed* with a circulation of 300 copies for each issue* 
This news letter continues to be a valuable aid and medium for 
presenting and discussing common problema and needs of the teachers. 



In cooperation with the University of Massachusetts, the 
Interseholastie Judging Contests were resumed again after a lapse 
of five years* Three elimination contests were held and a State 
Team was named in Poultry, ML Be and Dairy Cattle, which oompeted in 
the Regional and national Contests with honors* 

Another important event - F.F.A* Public Speaking - was 
also revived* Dlstriot and State contests were held and the State 
Winner participated in the Regional Contest held at the 'astern 
States Exposition* This event has been regarded as a Teaoher- 
Trainlng function and most of the planning and arrangement • for 
the State *inale wars handled in thia office. 

In- service Training. The 'Thirty-Sixth Suwner Confer- 
ence devoted w Professional improvement of Agricultural Teachers 
and Directors was held at the Norfolk County Agricultural School 
on July 21, 22 end 23* "lghty-aix members were in attendance. 
Thirty-five members participated on the program, covering a wide 
range of subjects. Dr. W* A* Smith of Cornell was the guest 
speaker from out of state. From the enthusiasm displayed by the 
members, it may be regarded as one of the best conferences in 
recent years* 



03 



In connection with the M. V»a. Convention held at Ksw 
Bedford on Hsy 10, 1947, a special in-service Professional Improve- 
ment program was prepared and held ae a eectlonal meeting. This 
oonsiated of a panel discussion led by a specialist from the 
University of Massachusetts. This year attention mas given to the 
ever increasing problems relating to instruction of pupils and 
adults engaged in/or heading toward part-time farming. 

The major part of title time of the Supervisor of Teacher- 
training mas devoted to supervisory visits to the schools and depart- 
ments, involving the phases of education which deal with the improve- 
ment of teaching. Visits were concentrated where they would do the 
most good - with new teacher a and apprentice teachers. Many indi- 
vidual problems found during a supervisory trip were followed up by 
letter upon return to the office. As a result, correspondence 
and editorial work re<juire much attention in order to keep the 
teachers well informed and oorrectly guided. 



. 



i 10 



TRADS kW INDUSTRIAL EDUCATIO* 

30TS AID ME3 

Day School a 

the enrollment in the All-day Schools for the year 1946-47 
was 9076 pupils. This represents an approximate increase of 10£ 
over the preceding year* Included in this enrollment are 1727 
veterans. 255 of these are receiving training in Worcester and 205 
in Springfield in classes organised for veterans exclusively. 

The total enrollment has not yet reached the full oapaeity 
of the school a. The opportunities for employment, at very attractive 
wage a, still exists for youths who have reached the age of sixteen* 
These opportunities for employment to persons who are vocationally 
trained have made communities conscious of the need for providing 
vocational education to their youth with the result that many school 
authorities have plans for Incorporating into their secondary school 
program State-aided vocational education* In Arlington a new 
Vocational High School was established with departments of Auto 
Mechanics, Machine and Radio and in Framin^ham was established a 
Machine department. 

Hew departments were organised in the following schools i 

Lynn Vocational High - Cabinet making 

Barnstable Vocational - Carpentry and Machine Shop - 

established as unit trade 
thus eliminating General 
Vocational Department. 

Maiden Vocational - Electrical 

Beverly trade - Machine Shop 

Charles W* Arnold Trade School, Haverhill - Upholstery 

Flttsfield Vocational - Cabinet making 

Weymouth Vocational - the Carpentry course waa re-established 

with a full enrollment. 

In the Saxton Trade School, Leominater, the course in steam- 
power engineering has been discontinued (June 1947). 

In Vineyard Haven the carpentry department was discontinued 
effective June SO, 1947 due to small enrollment. 






In Hudson a new General Vocational School hat boon 
established. 

In ivestport - General Vocational discontinued Juno SO, 1947* 

In Webster - General Vocational discontinued August 51, 1946. 

In Bedford - General Vocational discontinued Sep-sesaber 1* 1946. 

The enrollment in the Boys* General vocational Schools and 
Departments ie 2740, a slight increase emr the preceding year* 

P&rt-tiwe Cooperative, fort - time Tr a de iV eparatory, 
""" anil Appren ti oeshlp School s'."* 

Cooperative . The Cooperative Schools oontinue to render an 
issportant educate onal service to youth and returned veterans • 
Increased interest in this form of training is evident by the enroll- 
ment of 1541, an increase of 57X over the prooeding year. 

In Beverly the cooperative course in Carpentry for 
veterans -with an enrollment of SO has been effective in training 
vetsrans in this all important trade. In this course the cycle 
of instruction Is one month two weeks in industry and two weeks 
in school. Present rate of wages paid during the two weeks in 
industry is $1.15 psr hour. For the two week period in school 
no wages are paid. 

During the year four houses for westers of the olass 
were completed and five houses are now in the process of con- 
struction. In addition to the complete construction of houses, carpentry 
work for thirty-six Quonset huts was ooiRpleted by this school. 
The shop work performed during the two-week period (in sohool) 
is for the purpose of supplement ing the skills taught during the two- 
week employment on the job. 

At the Arthur A. Hansen Trade School in Naltham the 
Watchmaking cooperative course has been discontinued and a 7/atoh- 
naking Department has been established in the All-day Trade Sohool. 

Trade Preparatory . Several part-time trade preparatory 
oourses have been conducted during the past year. 

In Boston, at the Henry L. Pieree Sohool, a o our so in 
Piano Tuning and Repair ir£ was conducted. 

At the Boston Teachers College oourses were conducted 
in Machine Drafting, Machine 3hop and Radio construction and 
repair. 

In Lowell and Taunton short unit training in Power 
Stitching were established at the request of industry to prepare 
veterans for effective entry into the garment Industry as trained 
power stitchers. 



Ii2 



In Plymouth the course in Pottery Making continues in 
operation. 

Apprenticeship . Classes in related training for appren- 
tices were continued this year int- 

Boston Pittsfield 

Gloucester Springfield 

Hewton ffialthes 
Worcester 

Hew classes (schools) were established or re-established 
in the following eoraeranitiesi 

Attleboro Lynn 

Barnstable Maiden 

Beverly Marlboro 

Brockton Msdford 

Chioopee Hantueket 

♦Fitchburg Maw ediord 

Fall River Mewburyport 

Greenfield *Sorthampton 

Haverhill Pittsfield 

Holyoke Taunton 

Lawrence Weymouth 

Leominster Worcester 
•Lowell 

• Re-establishment 

The following programs were in operation during the year 
and indicate the number of apprentices served i 

Attleboro 

Related Machine (included Toolmakers, Hub and 
Die Makers) 18 

Barnstable 



Related Auto Mechanics 6 

Related Carpentry 22 

Related Electrical 29 

Related Plumbing 26 



Beverly 



Related Auto Mechanics 18 

Related Carpentry 12 

Related Elootrioal 18 

Related Plumbing 17 



. 






Boston 



Boston Teohnioal 



Carpentry 
Bricklaying 


81 
81 
67 


Boston Trade 




Airplane Meohanlea 

Cement Finisher 

Electrical 

Glasing (inside and out) 

Lathing 

Painting & Decorating 

Plastering 

Plumbing 


20 
21 

149 
21 
19 
87 
17 

189 


Brighton High 




Auto Mechanics 


160 


South Boston High 




Sheet Metal 


96 


Hyde Park High 




Sheet Metal and Iron fork 


20 (estimated) 


Mew York, Hew Haven and Hartford 
Railroad Program (In pliant exeept 
for Sheet Mot«l and Iron Work 




Diesel Engines 
Eleetrioal Maintenance 
Welding 


20 (estimated) 
20 (estimated) 
20 (estimated) 


Ruatoraft Publishers 
(In plant) 




Camera 

Dot Etcher and Retoucher 

Offset Feeder 

Platemeker (Vac. Fr.) 

Platemaker (Comp) 

Offset Pressnan 

Stripper 

Opaquer 


16 

9 

18 

8 

9 

28 

17 

II 



3o«ton (cont'd) 


Brockton 


Related Carpentry 
Belated Electrical 
Related Machine 
Related Plu»blng 


Chicopee 


Related Carpentry 


Fall River 



22 
10 
51 



- 



Related Auto Mechanics 22 

Related Carpentry 29 

Related Electrical 56 

Related Machine 8 

Pitohburg 

Related Machine 17 
Frandngha m 

Machine 2 (Trade Extension) 
Gloucester 



Related auto Mechanics 12 

Related Carpentry 22 

Related Masonry 7 

Related Painting and Decorating 6 
related plumbing( included SteamfittersjlS 



Greenfield 



Related Auto Mechanios 24 

Related Carpentry 21 

Related Electrical 12 

ReUted Machine 11 

Related Painting fc Decorating 14 

Related Plumbing 12 



Haverhill 



Related Carpentry lo enrol laent 



Holyoki 



LAwronoo 



; 



Rolatod Brloklftyiug 11 

Halatod Car poatry II 

galatoa Kloctrioal IX 

RtUW4 Flwfetnf (InoluOoa otoiuaflttor) 17 

Folatoa Sfa*ot Hatal T 



lf«latod Carpostry 

fioloted Eloctriaal 

Ralatod Painting * I •corating 

Rolatod Plua»ln« 



10 
14 

20 
19 



Loasinotor 



lowoli 



H«latod MfcoMuo 



?olat«d Auto ,tfooh*uioa 
P.olatoa Carp«»try 
pointed Klactrloal 

I'.olatod gfcO&iUe 

i-olatmi rlu«bin£ 



le 

»i 
11 

64 



»14* . 



Marlboro 



Holatod Auto ttoohaule* 16 

Polatod Carpentry H 

Folate Blootrioal 61 

Bolatoa Plunbin* 62 

Kalato>- Tool * Dlo Making 17 



; alatod Auto Itoohanlos 16 

Holatod cabinotaakin^ 6 

■'•Utad carpoutry (inoludod Mill work; 9 



ftolatod Carpentry 9 

Jfolatod Maohluo T 

Kalatod fainting 6 Doooruting 6 

Rolata Pluablag 7 



6 



MedTord 



Related Auto Mechanics 24 

Related Carpentry 21 

Related Sleotrieal 17 

Related Pluabing 29 

Belated i rinting 22 



haa tucket 



Special Progran blueprint Heading, Math., and 
Drafting. (Included Auto Veohanioa, Kleotrioian, 
tiaaona, painters it Decora tora, } lumbera, 
Upho later ere) IB 

delated Carpentry 12 



14 
17 

50 

2 
11 
39 
22 



Mew 3a 


ilford 






Related uto Mechanics 
Related Boatbuilding 
Belated A*l delaying 
Related Carpentry 
R»lated Kleetrical 
Related Painting A Decorating 
Related Pluabing 
Related Steanfltting 


Newburyport 






Related Auto Heehaniea 
Related Uaehine 


Heetoc 


1 





16 
6 



elateu .-.uto Ifeohanioa 29 

Related carpentry 24 

Related Plunbing 47 



lterthempton 



Related Carpentry 24 

Related rluaujini, 24 



lttafield 



Related Carpentry 22 

Related tfaohlne 31 



Spr ingfiel d 



v elate ; uto Mechanics Id 

Kelated *lokl»ylng 22 

Belated Carpentry 26 



1 17 



Springfield (Cont'd) 

Related Drafting 6 

Related Electrical 21 

Belated Patternmaking 2 

Related Plumbing 22 

Related Toofcraaking 20 

Taunton 

Related Plumbing 20 ( estimate ) 

-elated electrical 18 (estimate) 



lalth&m 



Related Auto Mechanics 16 

Related Machine 10 



Weymouth 



Related Auto Mechanics 32 

Related Carpentry 28 

Related Plumbing IS 



Worcester 



Related Auto Mechanics 45 

Related Bricklaying 14 

Related Cabinet Making 10 

Related carpentry 41 

Related Drafting 4 

Related Eleotrioal 57 

Related Machine 29 

Related Painting « Decorating 14 

Related Pattern Making 12 

Related Plumbing 22 

Related Steamfittlng 32 

Related Tool 4 Die Making 20 

Related Sheet Metal 16 



We anticipated acme difficulty in organising the program 
at the start one to the laok of accurate information on apprentices 
from the Department of Labor and Industries. Most programs were 
late in starting with the result that it was not possible to 
tplete 160 hours of related training for each apprentice. 



8 



The outlines that wore developed during the previous 
veer proved to be nest helpful but in some oases revision will 
be necessary to sake then More effective. Steps are being taken 
to compare our outlines with those in use throughout the country 
in order to take full advantage of the outstanding features of 
existing outlines. 

Present plans call for developing a few additional 
outlines in order to meet the demands for related training. 

Several special conf erenoes were held during the past 
year with employee and employer groups to establish more closer 
relationships and a more effective program. 

EVSHIHS SCHOOLS 
Continued expansion In memberehip with improved persistency of 
attendance have again been features of the post-war evening 
schools. This year veterans in large numbers have sought 
admission to the evening trade classes wherever* practical 
preference In enrollment has been given to veterans. 
The following school was established % 
Marlborough 

The following schools were re-established i Lynn, Bomerville and 
iiestfield. 
The following schools were discontinued i Fall River and lorthbridge. 



9 



The following 
:mmetable - 
Chieopee 
Srerett 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 
Leominster - 
Lynn • 
Marlborough - 
Bedford 
Hew Bedford - 
Quincy 
Somonrille - 

Southbridge - 

Springfield - 

The following 

Boston 

Chioopee 

Holyoke 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Medford 

Mewton • 



schools were established » 

Flushing. 

Airoraft Engine. und electrical. 

Electrical and Theory* Radio and Electrical Appliances, 
faperhanging. 

Blueprint Heading for Inspectors, chemistry of Paper- 
Sheet Metal Layout. 
Blueprint Reading for Carpenters, 
mohlne Drafting. 
Mac nine Shop Practice. 
Eleotrioal Code. 
First Class Fireman. 
Blueprint Reading for building Trades. 

Automobile Body and Fender Work, Carpentry, Eleotrioal 
and Fainting and Paperhanglng . 

Building Estimating, Metallurgy, Micro-Measurement and 
Plumbing. 

Airplane Mechanics, Elevator Construction for Electri- 
cians, Machine and Tool Design. 

oourses were re-established! 

Paperhanglng and Sheet Metal Drafting. 

Tel ding. 

Printing. 

Machine Shop Practice. 

Cabinetmaklng and Machine Shop Praotioe. 

Sheet Metal Drafting and Voiding. 

Architectural Drafting, Electrical Code and Machine 
Shop Practice. 







uincy - Klectrioi.1 Code, m chine shop Praetioe, Plumbing Mid 
Sheet Met*l Drafting. 

Socterville - Automobile Repair, i&chine Shop Practice and Printing. 

Southb ridge - fclectrioity, Sheet ^etal £ rafting, balding. 



Springfield - Autoaobile Ignition, Blueprint Reading and Mathematics 
for mohiniata, plueibing Layout and Deeign, Stationary 
Fireman and l&gineera. 

ore eater - Printing. 

Weatfleld • Automobile Repair, Ce'uinotaaking and Patternesaking, 

Electric Wiring, Machine Shop Praetioe, ..feehine Drafting, 
and machine Mathematics . 



The following eoureee were di a continued » 

Beverly - Autoaobile Repair, Carpentry, tfaohine Shop Praetioe 
Electricity. 

Boston - Refrigeration. 

Chieopee - Autoaobile Bo;y and Fender Work, Radio and Refrigeration 

Pitehburg - Beginning and Advanced Electricity, Machine shop 
Praetioe. 

Pall River - Cabinetaaking and Kleotrielty. 

Greenfield - Advanced Carpentry and plunblng. 

Holyoke - Indua trial Eleetroniea, and Welding. 

Lawrence - Welding. 

Lowell - lcotrioity. Radio and Y< el ding. 

Uedford - Sheet Metal. 

Mew Bedford - Plumbing 

Northbridge - liaehine rhop Praetioe. 

PittaPield - Autoaobile Meohaniea, Carpentry, Eleetrieal Code, 
Meehlne Blueprint Reading, Maohiue Shop J raetiee, 
Plestioa Teohnology, Radio, and Welding. 

"elaa - electricity and Kadio 

Taunton - Lead Burning, Carpentry. 

Springfield - Autoaobile Repair, Cabinetaaking, gleotronioa and 
Patternaaking. 






Waltham - Machine Drafting. 

7, ore eater - Automobile Repair, Carpentry 

Continuation Schools 

The Continuation School still affords a stabilising 
opportunity for those youths under 16 years of age «ho say and do 
leave school and enter employment at an early age with little 
preparation for the responsibilities which they assume. 

Fubllo Service Occupations 

The program of publie service occupations training has been 
extended this year as a result of requests for service from (1) the 
heads of two state hospital institutions, and (2) the State Fire Marshall. 

Changing personnel in the maintenance staff of the state 
hospital institutions combined with the U.S. record of disastrous fires 
in buildings housing numbers of persons has caused the heads of our 
institutions to be concerned with the problems of fire prevention and 
fire fighting. This offiee has assisted in organising and conducting 
such courses in two of the larger state hospital institutions. The 
fire marshal also requested assistanoe in the educational phases of 
Fire Prevention both with his own staff and with members of local fire 
departments assigned to fire prevention bureau service. Instructor 
training service has been rendered to both groups. 

Professional improvement cessions for the instructional staff 
of the Zone schools for Fireman Training have been conducted throughout 
the year. These sessions are devoted to improving the instructors in 









the techniques of teaching and in the organisation and classification 
of the teaching content. Fundamental training is supplied through the 
cone school staff to smaller towns and Tillages otherwise without 
resources for fire- an training. 

In cooperation with the Massachusetts Safety Council, the 
Boston Chamber of Commerce, and the Massachusetts Fire Marshal's 
Office, a 10-hour course in fire prevention technique was held in 
September for building custodians and superintendents. The course 
material was organised particularly for schoolhouce custodians. A 
tabulation of all the classes and courses held follows j 

Acton 

Amherst 

Ashburnham 

Ashland 

Belohertown 

Brewster 

Brookline 

Chatham 

Cusstington 

Deeriield 

Easthampton 

Pitohburg 

Granby 

Hoi den 

Msttapolsett 

Montague (2 olasses) 

Morthbridge 



' 



53 



Paxton (2 olaaaes) 

Springfield 

Hfcltham (2 classes) 

Westfield 

Whetley 

Worthington 

Worcester 

^ork in training of tea oners , lnoluding pre-aervico and 
in-servic e, bjr S tate board , Jay designated institution* , 
by local boar da of education . 

A firat year teacher-training oourae for proepective 
teaohera in State-aided vocational school* waa oonduoted in 
Boston during th winter months for tradesmen employed during 
the day. In addition to these evening classes, the aame course 
was conducted for two groups at the Pitohburg State Teaohera 
College during the month of July. 

Advanced teacher-training courses were conducted at 
Boston and ftoroester after school hours. In addition one unit 
of the advanced teacher-training course waa given to two groups 
at the Pitohburg State Teaohera College during the Sumner 
Conference. 

Upgrading of teaohera in aervloe waa done by the 
following method* t 

Obeervation of the teachers on the job by the State 
supervisors. Constructive eritielsm for improvement 
of teohniquea and methoda. 



Professional improvement oouraes were conducted under 
the direction of the division of Vocational Education after school 
hours end on Saturdays is 3oston, fioroester, Springfield, Pittsfisld, 
Hew *iedford, end lewton. A course for establishing a pattern for 
the organisation of courses of study was conducted in Lynn during 
the winter months. 

Graduate oouraes leading to the degree of Master in 
Education (Vocational) under the direction of tee Pi vision of 
Vocational Education were conducted at the State Teachers College 
in Fltchburg. 

The Sunmer Confereiice for State-aided Vocational School 
Directors and instructors was conducted at the Fitohburg State 
Teachers College. This conference consisted of talks and demon- 
strations by representatives of industry who are specialists in 
their fields, talks and demonstrations by leaders in Vocational 
Education from other States, demonstration of teaching techniques 
and methods by instructors from the vocational schools throughout 
the state who were selected for .heir ability as teachers and 
class organisers* A new development in providing instruction to 
the teachers at the conference was the concentration of i struct ion 
in one unit from a speolfic trade for the teachers of that trade. 
further developments along this like are contemplated. 



:5 



Cooperation with groups or organis ation s , such as emp loyee s and 
employers , v etera ns, and 11,8 . l&plqyr.ent Sj ervico 

During the peat year the Division of Vocational Education 
has continued to render valuable service in the training of returned 
veterans. The response by all vocational schools in the Commonwealth 
to the request of the State Dircotor of Vocational Education for 
assistance in inspecting proposed training programs, preparing 
necessary training outlines, and processing applications for approval 
of on-the-job training, has been most gratifying. 

The services of trained personnel (S5 full-time, 36 part-time 
supervisors) have been employed en this work during the past year. 
Until January 1, 1947, the cost of this service was borne entirely by 
the State and local communities. Since January 1, however, Federal 
funds have been made available through the Veterans Administration to 
defray the cost of this service except for some adainistrative costs 
borne by the State Department of Education. 

As a result of this great servioe to veterans which our voca- 
tional schools were particularly well equipped to render ther* have been 
investigated, processed and approved to June SO, 1947, over 18*000 
employing concerns 24,000 training programs involving over 46,000 
veterans. 

Throughout this very difficult program of veteran on-the-job 
training the Department of Education and the local vocational schools 
have maintained splendid working relationships with the other agencies 
interested and involved in this training local. State and Federal. 



. 









The contacts which those vocational schools have made with local 
employers and looal industries will, we feel sure, be of great 
value to the schools and the youth after the veteran training 
program has been completed. 
U se of Advisory Committees . 

Advisory committees are required for all schools in the 
State. Their assistance has been and will continue to be very 
valuable, especially as new courses are planned and apprenticeship 
programs expand. 
Superv ision for training of veterans . 

with the use of funds made available January 1, 1947, 
supervision will be possible for the program of on-the-job training 
for veterans. This supervision is important to make sure that the 
veteran is receiving the best training possible. 

Additional significant information relating to trade and 
industrial education, including! legislation, attitude of unions 
and employer groups, effect of industrial conditions on State 
program, new techniques used in the placement of persons trained, 
and shifting of labor foroe. 

We continue to feel that vocational education will have 
more demands from those wishing this type of opportunity than our 
facilities will afford. There has been an increased growth in 
Apprentice Training. Relations with organized labor continues to 
be excellent. 

Teache r-Training 

During the past year the first year Teacher-Training oourse 
outline has been revised. Subject matter has been organised into a 



12/ 



more logioal learning sequence incorporating new material and 
consolidating original subject matter into a pattern that will 
provide More efficient use of the Teacher-Trainer 1 • tine. 

Two new Teacher-Training oourse outlines have been written. 
One to be used for the speoifie training of Evening Trade Extension 
teachers. One for the speoifie training of Apprenticeship Related 
elass teachers. 

Pre-employment Teacher- Training . This year we hare con- 
ducted first year Teacher-Training classes in Boston during the 
winter Months for tradesmen employed during the day. In addition to 
these evening elasses the sane course was conducted for two groups 
at the State Teachers College in Kitehburg during the month of July. 
Twenty-six (£6) men were placed in teaching positions from our 
eligible 11 st of candidates. 

We have also oonduoted second year advanced Teacher-Training 
classes in Boston and Worcester after sohool hours. In addition one 
unit of the advanced second year Teacher-Training course was given to 
two groups at the State Teachers college in T itohburg during the 
Summer Conference. 

Training Tea c he rs In Service ^ Teachers in service were 
upgraded by the following methods. 

1. Supervisors of Teacher-Training made periodic visits to state-aided 
vocational schools for the purpose of observing the work of the 
teachers on the Job, criticism wa« made for the improvement of 
their methods of instruction, teaching skills, attitude and 
personal traits. In schools, when requested, talks were given by 
the State supervisors at faculty meetings em supervision, lesson 



128 



planning, etc. 

2. Professional improvement courses granting credit toward the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Vocational Education, were 
conducted under the direction of the Division of Vocational 
Education after school hours and on Saturdays in Boston, 
Worcester, Springfield, Pittsfield, New Bedford and Newton, 
Two hundrad and eighty-seven (287) vocational school teachers 
enrolled in these courses, A course for establishing a 
pattern for the organization of oourses of study was conducted 
in Lynn during the winter months. 

Fire hundred and fifty-one (551) teachers proposed 
professional improvement work and four hundred and nine (409) 
completed the work proposed whieh added to their professional 
standing. In addition, three hundred and thirty-three (333) 
teachers of shop and related subjects had satisfactorily 
completed trade contact requirements. 

The Division of Vocational Education, cooperating with the 
State Teachers College, Fitohburg, conducted graduate oourses 
leading to the degree of Master in Education (Vocational). 

3. Vocational Summer School at Fitchburg. 

The Summer Conference for State-aided Vocational School 
Directors and instructors was conducted at the State Teachers 
College in Fitohburg with an enrollment of six hundred (600), 
including three hundred and fifty (350) men, one hundred and 
ninety-one (191) women and fifty-nine (69) Direotors. This 
conference consisted of talks and demonstrations by representatives 
from industry who are specialists in their fields; ttlks and 
demonstrations by 



§29 



leaders in Vocational Education from other States; 

demonstration of teaching techniques and methods by the 

instructors from vocational schools throughout the state 

who were selected for their ability as teachers and class 

organisers. 

The Summer School was conducted on the group conference 

basis and included meetings for the following trade groups- 

Academic Draftsmen Printers 

Auto Mechanics ft Aviation Elect riaians & Radio Sheet Metal Workers 

Cabinet Makers Machinists Welding 

Carpenters Painters ft Decorators 

A new development in providing instruction for the 

teachers attending the conference was the concentration of 

instruction in one unit of a specific trade for teaohers of 

that trade. For the electrical group the specific unit was 

Lighting. Recognised authorities in this field were brought 

to the Summer Conference and for two periods each day they 

covered divisions of lighting, including Store Lighting, 

Offiee Lighting, Industrial Lighting, School Lighting. From 

reports received from our instructors this method was 

enthusiastically received. 

The following elective courses were conducted generally in the 

afternoon j 

Refrigeration 

Methods of Teaching Related Work for Apprentices 

Principles of Welding 

Radio Repair and Maintenance 

Organisation of Related Work 

Vocational Guidance 

Blackboard Drawing 

Auto, Body Refinishing 






S30 



Color Mixing 

Cabinet Making 

Conforenco Leadership Training 

Sheet Metal Problems 

Refresher Course in Teaoher-Training « 

General assemblies were held each day. The speakers included 

Commissioner of Education, John J. Desmond, Jr., Director 

M. Moreroaa Stratton, President Sanders of the State Teachers College 

in Fitehburg, John J. Seidel, Assistant State Superintendent for 

Vocational Education, State of Maryland, Arthur v.rigley. State Supervisor 

of Trade « Industrial Education, State of Sew Jersey. 

The regular four-week training course for prospective teachers in 
State-aided vocational schools was conducted with two groups and an 
enrollment of forty-three. Unit 1 of the advanced Teacher-Training was 
given to two groups - enrollment of sixty-one (61). 

This year at the Vocational 5 ussier School an opportunity was given 
to take courses granting credit toward a degree Master of Science in 
Education (Vocational). Under the direction of the Division of 
Vocational Education, the following credit courses were offered t 

Organisation, Administration, and Supervision of Vocational Education. 
Future Development of Vocational Education. 

Sp ools ! Teacher-Training Services 
Superv isory Training . I oil owing a marked decrease in Foreman Training 

due to the termination of war contracts an upswing in interest in this 

type of training by industries in Massachusetts has been noted airing 

thi -.; year. Conference leadership training and Instructor Foreran Training 

lead the field in the type of Foreman Training requested by Industries of 

the Division of Vocational Education, enrollment in these classes totaled 

three hundred and eighty-two. (382). 



13 



i^tblio Re ations Training . At the request of the Kew York Central 
Railroad, training program* have boon organised in Public Relations for 
their Pining Service, Personnel selected by the Sew York Central Railroad 
have been given an intensive eourse In conference Leadership by the 
Division of Vocational Education, and these trained leaders are now 
conducting Public Relation classes for stewards, waiters and cooks of 
the dining service. Approximately one hundoed and sixty (160) of these 
people will receive certificates from the Division of Vocational Education 
on the successful completion of these courses. 

Training programs have also been organised for the personnel in 
freight receiving and shipping departments of the Hew York Central Railroad, 
Classes were conducted at 3d s ton, Worcester, and Springfield by the Teacher* 
Training staff of the Division of Vocational Education, 

Art In Industry and Business 

*-n cooperation with the Field of Teacher Training of this Division, 
the Supervisor of Vocational Art Education conducted a degree course 
for teachers of the Division on "Design and Color for Vocational Teaohers", 
Classes .ere held at the Massachusetts .' chool of Art in Boston, A eourse 
in "Industrial Design" for employed designers and apprentices was 
cooperatively conducted with the Massachusetts School of Art in Boston, 
In cooperation with tike Field of Household Arts, a eourse was conducted 
at the High School in Greenfield for members of the Deerfleld Valley Craft 
Association, 

At the Vocational Summer School held In T itohburg a eourse on 
"Design for Handle raf te" was eonduoted in cooperation with the 
Homemaklng program for Girls* Trade and Handicraft teachers. 












\ 



O' 



The increase in Art Schools and classes planned for the 
instruction of service men has called for muoh study of teacher 
qualification and courses of study, art in Industry continues to 
expand, and consultation services increase accordingly. 

The Plymouth Pottery School has operated at capaoity. 

Following is a list of classes as conducted for the groups 

sientioned above t 

Pl ace Group Subject Ses sions E nrollment 

Boston Industrial Pirns Industrial Design 27 9 

Boston Vocational Teachers Design and Color SO 16 

for Vocational 
Teachers 

Greenfield Deerfield Valley Design for Uandi- 26 10 
Arts and Crafts craft 
Association 

Private Trade Schools 

During the year, work was continued on the reviewing of 
applications for original licenses from new schools, and for 
annual renewals of licenses under the private trade school 
licensing law (Chapter 686, Acts of 1941). 

On June 1, 1947, there was a total or 110 licensed schools 
in operation, oonparsd with 56 on thin date a year ago. 

Sixty-two new schools were licensed to giro instruction in t 

1. Airline Hostess 

2. civil Service 
6. Cosnaeroial Art 
4. Dressmaking 

6. Flight Training (47 schools) 
6. Floral Design 



°! n 



f . Ifcohino br*£ t,injg and Flaatloa 
Mold Doalfn 

8. Marina Stofclnoaring 

8. j*war s « 

10. ioohanLoai taatiotry 

11 . navigation 
IS. Photography 

15. Praatiaal Klootrlolty 
14. WLo Technician 

16. Refrigeration 
16. Shoo Repairing 
IT. Elfin crefte 

IB. Rteen Engineering 
10. Tool Deeicn 

}•«■ reoelvati frow eohoole for original wad renewal lieenaee 
fro* July 1, 1M6 to June 1, 1M7 anounted to $4026.00. 

Acting upon eonplainta fron >",. I. atudente tnuieaitted through 
the Yeter*na Adnlniatration, the Eujenrieor of Private Trade Schools 
carried out Invest lotions of five eohoole on a eoale «diioh 
involved ovory detail of aehool operation and adninl strati on. 

In oriier to have a baaia of atund*r<ie for the evaluation of 
prospective; ealioole, thi» off loo prepared * lo-pc&e bulletin 
(P.T.S.-100), entitled "Application of Rules end Begul*tiona 
Governing Private Treue Sohoole", covering the following items i 









I. Procedure for filing application for license 

' l 
1 . Ownership 

II, Application of rules and regulation* governing issuance 
of license. 

1. School premises 

2. Facilities on premises - lighting, sanitation, 
heating and ventilating. 

3. Floor space per student 

4. Size of olasses 
8. Teaching load 

6. Floor plans 

7. Equipment, tools, and supplies 

8. Courses of study 

9. Methods of instruction 

10. Qualifications of Instructors 

11. Qualifications of registrars and counselors 

12. School forms 

13. Attendance, grading progress reports 

14. Method of collecting tuition 
16. Advertising material 

16. Scope of lioense 

17. Fire drills 






In the prepareti a of stendar'te for elassraons, 
iu*traeti o», •quipswaA and supplies 1a apee.\fio courses, this 
off i«« has received assistanea fro* the following | rofeasional 
group* t 

Massachusetts Aviation Trade* Association 

Civil Aeroneuties Authority 

><aisaehusetts Aeronaut ion CosaaUsion 

Uesseehusetts Rental Soeiety 

Stat* Departaasnt of Ftiblle Health 

University of llaaaeehusetts * Department of fieri culture 

State Civil Serviee Connlselon 

U. 8. Coast Guard 

Asterleen Uedleel Association 

This offioe hae had to esauv.e the responsibility of 
assisting schools In the preparation of ourrioula. In the 
organisation of shops, and In the establishment of administrative 
systi 





















* ' 



TRADE, XMDCSTRIAL AND HOfctBMAJCIBG EDUCATIOI 
GIBLS AKD fcOFJHtf 

Day Industrial Schools 



The Directors of the several Trade Schools for Girls and 
the State Supervisors (woman) held an ull-dey conference at the 
David Hale Fanning Trade School for Girls, Ysoroester, on February 7, 1947, 
Under discussion were problems pertaining to trade education for girls 
and women, including general trends as shown in the several schools, 
the curriculum in Girls* Trade schools with reference to 
Trade High r.choolsj and requirements for admission to the Vocational 
Household Arts Department at Praminghan Etate Teachers College. 

On March 26, 1947 the local Board of Trustees voted to 
change the name of the David Hale Fanning Trade School for Girls, to 
the David Hale Fanning Trade High School for Girls. The high school 
diploma will be granted to those girls Interested in completing the 
equivalent of twelfth grade academic work, but the major purpose and 
concern of the school will continue to be trade training, fitting 
girls and women for wage-earning employment , through short units of 
training as well as the long time program. 

The various Trade Schools for Oirls have continued to serve 
the individual needs of adult women, men and boys, and veterans, 
desirous of short intensive training fitting for immediate employment. 

An interesting tailoring course was conducted for a group 
of veterans at the Boston Trade Ui,h School for Oirls. These men were 
at first assigned to a class with the girls, but as the number of men 
increased a separate olass was organised for them. The men were 
given special help aooording to their individual ability and interest, 






- 



being trained as bushelmen, some in pattern drafting, others 
in the actual tailoring techniques of high-grade, custom-made 
women 1 s wear. 

Several other men hare been enrolled in the Hair and 
Skin Department, and in the Bakery and/or Poods Trade Department 
of several of the Girls 1 Trade Schools. 

There has been an encouraging upward trend in the 
number of girls taking employment in the trade for which trained, 
rather than in unrelated fields as was the case during the war years. 

There has been no demand for part-time Trade Preparatory 
or part-time Trade Extension programs in the women's fields, as anti- 
cipated, as women were dropped from employment in war industries, 

Unfortunately, the enrollment in the existing Trade 
Schools for Girls has not increased appreciably as was anticipated. 
Attractive, well-paid jobs have continued to be available. Although 
the enrollment rias improved somewhat, the present facilities are far 
from being used to the fullest capacity. 

As soon as the enrollment warrants and a qualified teaoher 
can be found, it is planned to open the Tea Room daily, as a definite 
part of the Poods Trade Department in the Henry 0. Peabody Sohool for 
Girls, in Norwood . 

With the development of the Girls* Trade Schools into 
Trade High Sohools, further consideration will be given to the third 
and fourth years of the program, in order to justify the additional 
year or years of trade instruction. 





















Through the continued interest of a group of local 
dentists end the cooperation of the looal school authorities and 
the State Department of Education, progress has been made in 
determining the need, and securing the necessary facilities, for 
a training program for Dental Assistants, It is anticipated that 
such a training program may be organised for high school graduates, 
at the Springfield trade School, beginning early in the fall of 1947, 

DAY HOUSEHOLD ARTS SCHOOLS 

At the request of superintendent of sohools. State 
Supervisors have assisted looal committees, administrators, or 
teachers in evaluating going homemaking education programs, surveying 
community needs as to total homemaking education programs, 
planning laboratory lay-out and equipment, etc, Suoh servioe was 
rendered in Braintree, Huntington, Ludlow, Peabody, Southbo rough and 
Swansea, especially. 

As formerly, individual General Home Economics teachers 
have consulted with the State Supervisors in regard to the total 
home economic program in their locality, to revision of courses of 
study, to remodeling of the homemaking quarters, eto. 

The sohools have continued to assist the Red Cross and 
other welfare agencies, as needed, by making garments and other articles. 

The household arts sohools have continued tc cooperate with 

other departments in the sohools and other local groups, by serving 

speoial lunoheons, dinners, and teasj by putting on assembly programs j 

by participating in "Open House" programs, etc., thereby gaining 
valuable publicity. 






The ttusaohusetts Future Hosfcsmakers of America has 
not grown ia the number of affiliated chapters , nor made appreciable 
gain in aoeibership, at anticipated. 

Until the homcmaking teacher situation has improved and 
until such tine as more supervisory service is available specifically 
for this purpose, the program will not progress too rapidly as a 
truly state-wide program. 

The Essex County Homemaklng School organised an affiliated 
chapter this year, and several new chapters are anticipated in the 
near future. Although the membership has not increased appreciably, 
the organisation has continued to build on a sound foundation. 

Six meetings of the Massachusetts F.H,A. have been held 
thia year, the first in connection with the annual fall meeting of the 
Massachusetts Rome Economics Association. 

At the last meeting in May 1947, the incoming state officers 
were installed at an impressive candle-light service. Tour delegates, 
plus a sub-regional chairman, and three adults attended the Third 
North Atlantic (B A C) Sub-Regional Conference at Adelphi College, 
Garden City, lew Torn on Uarch 28 and 29 . 1847. 

The first Newsletter of the Massachusetts F.H,A. was 
issued in May 1947 through the combined efforts of the Essex County 
B om men k ing School chapter and the brooxline Bl^h School Chapter. 
is yet the newsletter has no official name, but the members will 
attempt to decide upon this matt or during the coming year. 

Paring 1949-47, as of J lay 19, 1947, the Community tohool 
Lu me n Program sponsored by the Massachusetts Departments of Education 
and "ublle 7 elf are, has served 160b public schools la 290 eltlea and 
towns. In addition, en Increasing aumber of non-profit private schools 









have benefit ad by the program. The organisation* admini strati on, 
supervision and promotion of the program have continued as formerly 
reported. Speoial effort has been made by all eonoarned to serve 
more A and B. meals, also, to inorease the consumption of whole 
unflavored milk. Wherever possible, the sohool administrators and 
teachers have been asked by Sohool Lunoh Supervisors, State 
Nutritionists, Extension workers, and others to include nutrition 
education pertaining to sohool lunches in their teaching at various 
grade levels. Posters and movies, showing comparative food values, 
have proved of speoial interest. 

Beoause of the repeated turnover of the homemaking teacher 
in many localities, the supervised home-project program has naturally 
been affected, as well as the continuity and effectiveness of the 
sohool instruction. Many good out-of-class experiences have been 
undertaken by the girls, but the supervision, including home-visiting 
has been perhaps mere oasual and less well-organised than in former 
years. 

There has continued to be much interest in the remodeling 
and redecorating of homemaking quarters. Many communities have taken 
advantage of the "Westinghouse Plan", but before having stoves 
installed have tried to rearrange the equipment more in keeping with 
the present-day philosophy of all-purpose homemaking rooms. 

In several situations, the girls themselves, under the 
supervision of the homemaking instructor, have (tone much of the 
redecoration work. 

Architects, sohool superintendents, teaohers, etc., have 
continued to turn to the rtate Supervisors for criticism and 
suggestions relative to proposed plans. 



148 



The instructors and pupils in several homemaking programs 
have »ade rather thorough studies of entrance requirements and train- 
ing opportunities in the several Home Economies Colleges in the state, 
and have analysed local employment opportunities and careers for home 
economies trained girls, Many fine posters have been worked out and 
displayed in the corridors or library of the individual schools, and 
have been used as guidanoe material. One State Supervisor borrowed 
one such set of posters and displayed them at several of the meetings 
of the Massachusetts Home Economics Association, as an inspiration to 
other teachers to develop similar effective guidance material. 

ADULT HOMEMAKING 

Three localities, Manchester, Pembroke and Swansea have 
obtained the necessary town vote authorising the establishment of 
vocational education programs, have met all approval factors for a 
state-aided program, and are ready to initiate a Practical Art pro- 
gram in the fall of 1947. 

One hundred sixty-five Handicraft courses were conducted 
during 1946-1947. Ceramics was offered in Newton j Weaving was added 
in Newton and in Salami Jewelry was added in Jrookline, Newton end 
Norwoods Metal Ware was offered for the first time in Newton; 
Rug Hooking was added in Andover, Pall River, Lexington, Nantucket, 
Norwood, Weymouth and ffinehendon. Braided Fugs was added in Brockton 
and Sal em j and Decorative Ware was added in Brookline, Somerset and 
Taunton. 

in answer to the needs of young brides and brides-to-be. 
Poods olasses were offered and successfully completed in Brookline, 
Holyoke, Melrose and Springfield. 















• 



Everett, Full River, Newton and Yialtham offered additional 
courses in Upholstery and Slip-Cover Making as a help especially to 
veterans needing furniture for newly established hones. Several 
veterans have opened upholstery shops as a result of the training 
received. 

rood Ref inishing eas added to the program in Abington, 
Solyoke and Melrose. 

Cambridge established a course in lip-Cover Waking and 
Knitting for two groups at a local Settlement House, These women 
wanted the instruction but would not go to the High School, nor 
could the High School afford storage space for the slip-cover unit. 

Home Nursing which had practically disappeared from the 
adult Homemaking program during the last few years, was reorganised 
in Lynn, and taught by an ex-service nurse and former Practical Art 
teacher. Such a combination ef experience on the part of the teacher, 
promises to be a real Interest factor for Home Nursing classes in the 
future. 

Dressmaking demands have been greater than ever, with 
facilities and qualified teaching personnel used to capacity. 

In order to accomodate the large number of somen seeking 
Dressmaking courses, severe! localities changed to a single weekly 
class of three hours, rather than the former two meetings weekly of 
two hours each. 

Upholstery and Slip-cover Making followed closely in demand 
after Dressmaking and Handicrafts. Every effort was made to meet the 
requests and classes were held throughout the State, limited by lack 
of storage facilities and qualified touchers. 






After * lapec of rivo yours, the Adult gaftsswkiiifc pro$,r*ai 
wue reestwblisoed in 3rooclliie In response to popular uesasnd. 
Although «4 the stttrt it ees proposed to offer only Clothing sad 
Foods, oourse* ia Blip- Cover sinking, iietal «*rs, Jewelry, Flower 
krr**&*&»nb &«4 ecorfeted Ear* were fcl&o offered, 

Heveriuil *l«e> re-esteolished the i.ault Honenckiafc progrea, 
r?*ur.iag the hrsssaaklng courses i *nd organised ea Upholstery oourse. 

In oroer to oiler the instruction in locations acre convenient 
t%> the *Oteea enrolled, Additions! school centers marm o^ou in 
Beverly, Ce-Miirid^e, Caiaepee, Essex eoumy, ftaeerhiU, nolyoke, 
Lftwreaoo, Sewten, DortkiUiiptaa, Sonerset, Springf ield, Y.&ltheiu end 

* eee**^SF ^•^p % s^^^* s* s} 

*g«in ta« isueevr^ile ^waatoriua requested help la offering 
e «v>ar*e hi i*er«o«»l Hygiene to « group of ..weive oonveieeoeuti 
confine to the hospital* ku ei'furt was «t»iW» this y**.r to here toe 
coarse est- ulisheu in the usufcl »*y, through ths laeel school 
authorities, hut this u»s iapossiulu, Jkguitt, through aj*»oi*l, eoopere* 
tive ktivn^eciuut* between tt»'» Stoats Bet ertaeat of Udueation end the 
8Ute epwrtunt of Public health, the eourse w*e orfere .: an<t success- 
fully conplete»i. 

The "tete ^uperrisor* worked closely with a leadership group 
interested ia upgrading end t-roaotlag handicrafts. As a result of this, 
sad la response to other requests, e specie! Tee-jher-Traiaing course 
for ii*acloreft teeehers, tnaght by e wester crafts aa a Teeeher-Tr»lner 
is to be conducted *t the saauel Vocational Susater ' uheel during 
July 1M7. 



The Ftate Supervisors have assisted with the Veteran 
Training Program by visiting on-the-job training programs to 
supervise working conditions, to advise as to approvable length 
of training programs, etc. 

Using the standard and tre&dle of an old sewing machine 
as a base, the Machine Shop boys of the Hewton Trade School, constructed 
a satisfactory potter* s wheel at a nominal cost. This wheel will be 
used by the Pottery Class in Hewton. ;ther Trade Schools have 
volunteered to make similar Pottery wheels. 

The Third Annual Handicraft one-day Conference was held at 
Fitohburg State Teachers College in July 1846, with approximately 175 
to 200 interested craftsman and teachers in attendance. The m» jor 
theme of this conference was the marketability of handicraft products. 



I 






. 



• ro-Mcploynent Teeeh© r-?raAr} in*:. 

1. At State To*oh»r» College, rrfenin£hen, the resident 
training courae for vou&tion&l household arts taaohera has continued 
in the win na reported for the y«*r 1W&-48. A ourrioulun oonnittee 
*t the collar,©, with the reaicent eupervieor as a nenber, haul con- 
tinued to study posaibi* ehange* aa presented at tha College Curriculum 
C oaf e ranee held in Boeton in Soveaber IWfl. 

a.. Tha Child Car* and Training inatruetio©, with 
directed observation or young ahil dreuj abort 
unit special Methods eouraea in Stllliaery, *nd 
ryaperiee inclu Ung Slip Coverai aloe, a two-* 
point college credit course in Family Relation* 
ships were eonduebe«i by eualiried teachers. 
Similar courses will be conducted in 14X7-46. 

b. Undergraduate apprentice tat.ohara have continued 
to have eight mil weeks of supervised teaching 
in their Junior year. This superviaeri teaching 
ana one for six .<eeka at tha Fesex County , 
Rear Bedford, Ba\ith*e and ftoreeater All-Day 
Independent Houaehold Arte School* and tha 
Haverhill High : ohoni Household Arte Depart»emt f 
and for two weeka in tha vocational houaehold 
art* departm*nta in email high aahoola at Agftwau, 
Bourne, ftandolph, Seltuata and float aridgemmter. 
This eame j >i«n for undergraduata apprantiaa 
teaching mill be continued in 1947-td. 

a. Tha raaiuant auperviaor ha* continue, to help all 
vocational houaehold arta etuuemte to benefit aa 
fully am poaalble fron all eel lege work and activi- 
ties. For one or nore yaera iol lowing graduation, 
aha haa viaiteu than in their aahoola, ecrrea ; ond«*d 
with then, and given then amah profaaalonal hel, . 
Through their aunaar emplcyamnt, with the advice 
of tha real dent auperviaor, nany atudanta have added 
ueterUily tc> their vocational experience. 






d. Trade experience waa conducted aa formerly for eight 
full daya, atudanta being aaaigned in Beaton to the 
Women's ity Club, the College club, and the Trade 
High ichool for air la. 



146 



2. Graduate apprentice teaching made possible since 1934 
by George-Flltey, George-Reed and now George-Deen Funds, has been 
continued in 1946-47 under supervision of the Framingham resident 
supervisor and heads of the local schools at Hew Bedford and Smith* s 
(Northampton) All-Day Independent Household Arts Schools. 

There were no vocational household arts graduates available 
for this training in 1946-47 but two otherwise qualified household arts 
graduates were secured for a year of training, 

3. Teacher-Training courses of varying lengths for teachers 
in household arts and continuation schools or in practical art classes 
for woren, including handicrafts, employed subject to teacher -training 
or prospective candidates otherwise qualified, were conducted at the 1946 
Vocational Summer School at State Teachers College, Fitohburg, from July 
1 through July 19. 

a. Short teacher-training units for Red Cross Arts 
and Skills Workers and Jewish War Veterans 
Diversified Occupation Workers in Greater Boston 
Veterans' Hospitals, were conducted. 

b. Units of training in "Production of Design Motifs" 
were given to oraft teachers and craftsmen at 
Boston, Greenfield, and Pittsfield by the Supervisor 
of Vocational Art in Industry and Business. 

4. A teacher-training course cf eighty hours' length was 
conducted in Boston by an Assistant Supervisor for 46 prospective 
teachers otherwise qualified to teaoh in adult homemaking classes. 

Training Teachers In-Service 

1. At the oOth Vocational Summer School for Teachers and Super- 
visors in State-aided Vocational Schools also General Borne Economios 
teachers condueted at State Teaohers College, Fitohburg, from July 1 - 
July 19, 1946 by the Massachusetts Department of Education, 






Vooationfcl Division, the following courses were offered for pro- 
fessional impoovenenti Foods sum! Kutritlen, Clothing, Blackboard 
Sketching, Use wad Operation of Visual Aid Apparatus, Art Activities, 
Appreciation of Color and Design, Guidance Workshop, Trade Education 
.'Voblens Workshop, Sononaklwg ! roblena Workshop, Coot and Jacket 
Construction, FUsily Life Workshop, iresssiaklng, Decorative Heedlework, 
Loatheroraft, Decorated T*are, Bag Slaking, Glove Making, Nutrition stfueation, 
Organisation and Administration of Adult Hoaemkicg classes, Design 
for Craft Workers, Jewelry and Millinery. The 12th School Lunch 
Management course. Including nutrition for 10)1001 lunch, quantity 
oookery, and demonstrations of various produete an-.'- food praotioee 
was attended by 25 school lunch Mongers and workers. An Applied Art 
Workshop for Camp, Club and Community craft teachers was also offered 
at the Coach House Fellowship Center, Towns ond Harbor, from July 6-19. 

All women supervisors, the supervisor of Vocational Art 
Dduoation and othsr supervisors of the Vocational Division, as well 
as supervisors frost other departments of the Commonwealth assisted 
in this summer school prograsi. 

2. Bee 2(b) above. 

3. Mo special professional improve* «nt classes were conducted, 
due to look of funds. Mew Bedford Voeat.onal Household Arts Sohool 
organised a short course in "Meeds of Youth" which was opan to all 
teachers and to the community. This course was aeoepted for pro- 
fessional improvement for 1946-47. 

4. Group and individual conferences have bean helri during the 
year in various parts of the r.tatc for different t.-pec of tsaohero as 
the need warranted. 









DISmBUTlVB SBUCATIO* 

The I Lstributive Education Program la Massachusetts experienced a 
significant expansion in all three areas of our sendee. In the day cooperative 
programs the expansion took place in the number of pupils enrolled , while the 
part-time program revealed increases in pupil population, course offerings, 
and total number of active centers, fly far the greatest gain was revealed in 
the evening programs where geographic placement showed extended coverage to 
several communities which heretofore lacked our service. This development 
took place largely through courses which were conducted for veterans and others 
who are employed in distributive outlets or who anticipate starting a business 
of their own. The sucoess of the program was based upon the intense interest 
of the enrollees and the unusual active demand for information and knowledge 
in operating independently-owned small enterprises. All indications seem to 
point to an even greater development of this kind of training during the coming 
school year. Hover before has this section experienced so great a demand for a 
training program in any specialised field of endeavor. 

Considerable effort was given to the dissemination of information in 
various centers relating to the courses and programs offered to groups of workers 
in distributive occupations. Part of this effort took the form of survey work 
in lorth Adams, Quinoy, Gloucester, Hew Bedford, Fall River, Taunton, Holyoke 
and Somerville, The surveys were facilitated through the cooperative contributions 
of information from businessmen and school administrators within the respective 
communities. The prime purpose of the surveys was to clarify the understanding 
and to reveal the needs for Distributive Education training within certain 
eossnunitles. 









Sight field and office oouf orenoes were conducted this 
past year to bring the teaching and supervisory personnel in our 
field of service closer to the immediate and over-all objectives 
of our work. Of these eight conferences, two were directors* 
conferences in which this section wide general sad specif ic 
recosfinendations relating to Distributive Education. Three con- 
ferences were conducted for part-time instructors and supervisors 
relating to program planning, new courses, course oontent and 
special organisational problems. Three part-day conferences were 
operated for teacher-coordinators and related subject teachers in 
the Day Cooperative Programs. These conferences entertained such 
topics as cooperative store relationships, coordinating activities, 
promotional activities, record procedures and curriculum planning. 
A Four-Day Conference V ork-shop was conducted for in-service 
teachers at the Fitchburg State Teachers College June 30 to 
July S which oonoerned various problems and activities in our 
service. Considerable time was spent in group discussions with 
the Staff on the new State Plan lor Vocational Education. 
Approximately eight State taff meetings ware devoted to the planning 
and construction of the new state Plan. A great many short con- 
ferences were held with teachers and supervisors to obtain a 
consensus on various aspects of the new state Plan. 

This section participated in six Advisory Committee 
meetings in Qrookton, Horth Adams, Springfield, Quinsy, Gloucester 
and Bolyoke to stimulate and acquaint those people with their 
duties and responsibilities. In all cases emphasis was directed 
on what members of the Advisory Committees can do independently 
and collectively to aid school administrators in promoting the 






program, aeleeting Ktudont*, providing employments, relieving up 
the graduate* *»<i aeeuring elcearo*m enter! al a and equipment, 

A aUecblo portion of th« field work waa tied to 
inveetlgatlon and itsapetitien of training feeilitioa end progrcme 
in bueiuoae eetebllfthmenta te report on the ability of eueb 
^atebiiehaenta te train veteran* under Public Lee 679, Some tine 
vrat elno given te awheel effielele who sought eounaal amu advice 
In eatauliahimg iiom-reiwburaablo oeoperative office training pro- 
grame end retell training programc within their aehools. Thia 
la e apeelel eervieo performed at the reeueat of the Director 
of the vocational ! melon. It la natural to expect that thoae 
eoaameUtiee whioh were el 'Jed in developing aon«reimbur*able retail 
training programa will at *ow« future date be prepared to meet the 
apeelfie reo^lrewexite In order to become eligible for rederal end 
State aid. 

Pour trede aaaeeiatioae sought and were given aid la 
planning training programa for worker* in their field. There la 
the poeelbility that training programa will aw eonetltuted for 
thoae people who are employed in theae particular erema of d' atri* 
butluo, Theae trade aaaeeia lone were the American 3elUng A ••eolation, 
the Hew England Retail Coametle A escalation, the national Conf eetianera 
Association, and the Maaeaohueetta Jeweler* Aeeoeletlon, Aa a 
result of early planning with repr eaentatiwea of the Xatlomal 
Confeetionera aaaoelatlon, two pilot programa In "Balanced Celling" 
for candy eel ear en wore operated thia ymr. It 1« believed that 
pregrana for candy aaleamaa and dlstributora will be erganiaed to 
•9T9m a aateh larger group thia coming year. Opportunities for further 






development in specialised areas of distribution are becoming 
increasingly evident, consequently every effort will be given 
in preparing training aids and services for the demands as they 
ooour. 

A most valuable eerriee was given to veterans who hare 
started businesses of their own* A carefully prepared program 
consisting of ten to sixteen sessions of instruction on various 
elements of snail business operation was operated in nine centers 
throughout the ftate. 

A manual for instructors in the snail business course 
was developed this past year. This nanual was used both in the 
teacher training and regularly scheduled classes conducted in the 
respective centers. Some revision and expansion of the content 
of the manual will be made before next year. Thirty- three sessions 
were led by the State Supervisor in technical phases of this 
particular program. 

Aside from the Conference Workshop operated at the 
Fitchburg state Teachers College for in-service teaohers for four 
days, the pro-service and in-service teacher training was confined 
to thirty-nine part-day and all-day sessions at various centers 
throughout the State, This teacher-training activity was conducted 
on an Itinerant basis whenever and wherever the need became evident. 
Two twenty-hour teacher-training programs were operated this past 
year for part-time and evening instructors. The training was con- 
fined to the many aspects of the program in "Small Business Operation 
and nine instructors were prepared to carry on work in this special 
program. Bo formal work was done in the way of preparing pre-servioe 



M 












te*ah»r« la *ny at the Xevaia of the ! <enrtoe exoopfc for Inform*} 
offioe oonfarenoea with tenahcr o&ndlcSataa who anticipate esaployic-atit 
la rdatributlve c-«eu;-atiotui braising, 

prellalnary luveatlgfttioua *nd plana here been amde for the 
purpoee of determining tha apeeifio laatr j*ti onal neede in the wnriowa 
©enters, the iuo,uiriea were lix&itfec! to the day cooperative ^ivgrwaa 
with particular attention jfecuaed g» current retjulrfesattnta n» rovealeeS 
by th« iooui esiploy&ent situation. ?hu« the oonoluslons reaahed la 
eaoh of tho studies will lead to closer affinities between the oa-the- 
Job requireaonte and the achool act. Yity. In briei the aethod utilised 
la the study, was to devise olesaif ieetloxui or Job groupings with en 
owawl nation and analysis of the *«ttt».l akiUa, knowledge, teehnlquea 
and responsibilities dottfaded la th« several occupational eetegorioe. 
Also attecj>ta wrre e*de bo define the -iegree or level of knowledge, 
aklll and respensi :iiity required for the Jjoba. la eontera where 
cooperative students find their sivloyiuent in anall ar etorea 
(ft bo 1ft employees) greater difficulty wee encountered la exposing 
apealfle entice and eotlvitlee. Tale aapeat of the inveati jcUon waa 
aatlelpatod because of the eoaawaly fluid and flexible organisational 
atrueture of the smeller type of store, nevertheless, excellent 
progress eaa made la the severel eentera la whieh the work was 
earrled oa largely because of the wholehearted Int rest aad eooper*tloa 
by the loeal aerohanta aad uualaeaa leaders. It appears that eontlaued 
efford la this direction will not only serve to latorpret end rartae 
the instructional aeeda of the eehool program but will alao provide 
* aouiid heal a for atore management's approach to their p<irecan«l 
ecloctloa probli 






heel evidence has been displayed litis past year relating 
to th» additional benefits received by cooperative stuaents finding 
employments in smaller retail outlets. Four centers reported that 
students enployed in specialty anc snail retail stores received higher 
wage rates and store promotions than those students who were plaoed in 
larger stores. For some tine it has been the belief of this section 
that the need for training was greater with the smaller stores than 
with the large retail organisations , and that small store owners and 
managers acquainted and having direct contact with the service were 
acre conscious of the benefits emerging from the training program. 
Consequently, we find many smaller stores in a better position to 
provide outstanding employment opportunities to our students than 
the giant department stores. This is by no means a typical condition 
throughout the state, but the facts tend to emphasise the need for 
increased attention to the aemand and challenge to serve those who 
need us most. Therefore, it is planned to direct careful research to 
guide the curriculum reorganisation and devise instructional material 
for those cooperative students who will be employed in the smaller 
stores. Two teaoher-ooordlnators and three part-time teachers have 
been assigned to create and aevelop teaching aids for this special 
purpose. It is also planned to construct training programs considering 
particular phases in small business operation which can be introduced 
and ada, te to the instruction- 1 content of the day cooperative program 
whenever and wherever the treatment is warranted. In this approach, 
it is hoped that the offerings will receive full endorsement both in 

centers where training is now established as well ao in those 

in 
communities where enthusiasm lor any undertakiiig/our field of training 

is lacking* 



54 



An aggressive attempt will be maOe this costing year to 
acquaint employers, trade orgnisetions, schools and distributive 
workers with complete and dotal isd information regarding the 
values and benefits of programs of instruction In Distributive 
►ducat ion. These plans oaXl for closer cooperation and increased 
effort on the part of non-school organisations representing all 
areas of distribution. 

Certain adjustments will be nade in the oourse content 
for part-tine cooperative programs in two centers. These adjust- 
ments will not affect the core curriculum but will attempt, in the 
main, to gain a closer approximation of current store activity and 
prooedure* 

Further investigations will be carried on to determine 
the ways and means of organising a day-cooperative program f tt boys 
who find employment in food merchandising. At present the high 
Interest sod a amend for such training makes such a program an 
absolute necessity to round out and enhance the offerings in our 
field of training. 

Tsnmhcr-tralnlng work will be conducted much the sase as 
in the past except that more frequent t each er-t reining conferences 
will be scheduled If the demands on the ftate Pu; errisor's time 
from other phases of activity ere lessened. The teacher-training 
plane for next year include t 

Two twenty-hour programs lor selected teaching personnel. 

Three one-day conferences entertaining current problems 

and possible solutions with in-service teachers. 

Fifty part-day conferences to be held on an itinerant basis 

la Jletrlbutlve 'duoettem schools. 



§55 



A one-week Conference Work-shop at Fitchburg State 

Teachers College for teacher-ooordinatcrs. 

The one-week Summer Conference Workshop held at 
pitohburg State Teachers College is an annual Professional Improvement 
requirement of our in-service teachers. Thirty clook hours are 
accredited to in-service and pre-service teachers attending all sessions 
of the conference. 

Even though a wide expansion was experienced in the part- 
time and evening areas of our work, definite barriers were encountered 
in the effort to establish day cooperative schools. Impediments faced 
in this direction were largely concerned with the inability on the part 
of local school administrators to follow through with early plans and 
original promotional efforts expended in their communities. In many 
instances administrative responsibilities overlapped making the 
initial approaches to the organization and establishment of day 
cooperative programs extremely complex. Until lines of responsibility 
and supervision have been resolved in these communities further 
activities to stimulate new programs will be held in abeyance. 

Program D with courses in "Job Instruction Training" and 
Human Relations Training" continues to meet the popular demand and 
full acceptance from store management , "Human Relations Training' 
has gained in stature with a considerable number of requests for 
the program to be satisfied during the coming year. Thirty-six 
courses in Program D were operated enrolling 368 supervisors and 
store executives. Seventeen courses in "Small Business Operation" 
were conducted during the year in nine communities with a total 
enrollment of 452. Seven Pre-Christmas training programs this 



156 



past year prepared 536 seasonal worker* in six oities and towns for 
seasonal employment, all requests hare been satisfied for this special 
training program with narked success. Two pilot programs in 
"Balenoed Selling" for thirty eandy salesmen and distributors were conducted 
in order to test and refine the instructional material and method. It is 
anticipated that an increased number of programs in this area will be 
offered next year, an attempt to bring now and qualified teachers to the 
program will be made before additional programs are est bli shed in this 
specialised field. One evening course in "Ccstumn Design" for 28 sales- 
persons of women' 8 apparel was conducted in Springfield. Cooperative 
part-time programs were operated in nine centers last year enrolling 
150 students, an increase of 20 per cent over last year. 

It does appear that fifteen additional communities could 
support part-time distributive education programs in Massachusetts which 
will serve a greater number of the high school students who will find 
their initial or eventual employment in stores. To affect the establishment 
of these programs renewed aggressive attention Bust be given to promotional 
work and organisational problems. It is expected that resistance to 
proposals for new programs will be found in many towns due to the tightening 
of school budgets brought about by siseable increases in teachers* salaries, 
also, merchants in some centers are scrutinising their over-head costs and 
may be somewhat reluctant In aoeepting part-time cooperative students 
next year, k* accurate predictions cannot be projected at this time regard- 
ing employment conditions in retailing, present ; lans will follow through 
with promotional and organisational aotivity in selected communities in the 
same manner as last year. The fact that competitively cooperative students 



m *•• 












tar • n »n 






^^^^^^H 






157 



have Assumed a position of outstanding oompetenoe in employment 
when compared with the rank and file of workers now engaged in retailing 
should eneourage unappraised sohool officials and businessmen alike of 
the merits of the training, nineteen cities and towns were accomodated 
with distributive education programs this year, an increase of almost 
75 per cent. The total enrollment in all programs was 1569, an increase 
of approximately 42 per cent over last year. Of this total the day 
cooperative program accounted for 150 students, the part-time programs 
790, and evening programs 639. 



18 



cccxrpkiioMkh ikfokkatioh abd vocational counseling 

Increased interest in the development of guidanoo services in 
schools was manifested by administrators and other school personnel during 
the year. The need for such sorricos was evidenced by many returning 
veterans as well as by youth enrolled in our schools, who, faced with the 
problem of formulating plans of adjustment for the future and finding 
themselves unable to arrive at sose plausible solution unaided, sought 
assistance and guidance from the school personnel. The Occupational 
Information and Vocational Counseling Service was primarily concerned 
with promoting and organising such services in the sohool systems of the 
State. 

Several conferences and conventions sponsored by organisations 
eonneoted with or interested in education devoted sections of their 
programs to the field of guidance. At the Franklin County Teachers 
Convention held at Greenfield, "The Functions of the Guidance Program 
e.8 a Means of Assisting Pupils to Meet the Objectives of the Curriculum" 
were described by this Supervisor to two separate groups of administrators 
and teachers of the elementary and secondary levels, "Guidance Activities 
as a Means of Attaining the Objectives of the Elementary Sohool Program" 
was the topic presented to approximately 200 elementary school principals, 
supervisors, and teachers at their Summer Institute held at Leslie College 
at Cambridge. 

Other promotional talks in which the needs and functions of 
guidance programs were described at meetings of other interested organisations, 
They werei The Marlboro Rotary Club; the Shelbume Falls, P.T.A.I the 



159 



Xiwanis Club of Shelburne Fallsj the Crane F.I.A. of l^ittsf^sldf 
and at the High School Career Day at Andover. 

Guidanoe la general was accorded a prominent place on 
tho pro gran at meetings and conferences held by various ether 
educational and personnel organisations. Among thai were the 
Vocational School Directors* Conference, Hotel Lenox, Boston} 
bhe Society lor the Advancement of yanaganent, City Club, Boston; 
the joint meeting of the Personnel Livision of Gillian lilene's Sons 
and the Greater Boston Vocational Guidanoe Association, Bc&tonj 
a conference of invited representatives of business and industry 
and the guidanoe personnel of public schools and colleges, 
Babson*s Institute, Yellesley, Attendance at these gatherings 
provided opportunity to make new ooutaots and to uiseuss the work 
of guidance in general. 

Effective guidance services cannot bo rendered unless 
properly trained personnel is available to organise and administer 
guidanoe programs. There is still an apparent lack of such personnel 
wo assume guidance duties in our schools. The State plan icr 
Vocational Guidance provides for tho selection and training of 
counselors and oooporation with teacher preparation institutions 
is necessary for this endeavor. Contacts were made with represen- 
tatives oi these institutions and the possibilities for the inclusion 
of counselor training as part of tho total offerings were discussed. 
The University of Usssachusetts and the ntate Teachers Colleges are 
ideally situated to undertake this program. 



80 



Initiated by the Sohool Department, an occupational 
survey was conduoted by a group of 21 vocational and high sohool 
teachers at Pittsfield during the year. The objectives of the 
survey were i 

1. To determine the present occupational opportunities 
and trends in this community. 

2. To determine the qualifications and training needed 
for entrance employment into these occupations. 

3. To determine the need for curriculum changes or the 
establishment of new offerings in the vocational 
and high schools. 

4. To interpret and use the information thus obtained 
for occupational information and counseling by the 
guidance service. 

The survey was under the supervision of the Superintendent 
of Schools with the Director of the Vocational Sohool serving as 
general chairman and the Director of Guidance as his assistant. 
Over 1900 employers were contacted while the survey was in progress 
and excellent cooperation was given. The collection of the data has 
been completed and a report of the findings is in preparation. It 
is expected that the report will be ready for distribution in the Fall. 

In conjunction with this survey, a course in "T jehniques 
of Occupational Surveys' 1 was given to prepare the teachers to undertake 
this project. The course carried two credits towards the Bachelor's 
degree. It was given by this Supervisor who also served as consultant 
to the committee while the survey was in progress. 

To determine the need and desirability of establishing a 
Plastics Training Institute, a request was made to the Director of 
Vocational Education to assign personnel to conduct a sun .y of the 
Plastics Industry of Leominster. The State Supervisors of Teacher 
Training, Private Trade Schools, and Occupational Information and 
Vocational Counseling were delegated that responsibility. The 
proposed survey was suggested by the Chamber of Commerce and the 



Plastios ASanufaeturers who felt that the school department could 
establish a training institute to prepare moldnakers, draftsmen, 
designers, maintenance men, and laboratory technicians currently 
needed by that industry. 

The following procedures were employed in conducting 

the surrey t 

1. Contacts were made with the Mayor, the Superintendent 
of Schools, the Director of the Trade School, and 
members of the School Committee, to ascertain their 
opinions and attitudes toward the project. 

2. A survey of the school facilities and the available 
personnel to operate such a program followed. 

3. Contacts were made with the managers and per Bonn el 
directors of seren major plasties industries to 
determine the need for such trained persons and the 
possibility of permanent employment. 

4. An evaluation was made of the findings by the survey 
group who reported that there was a definite need for 
training in the areas listed above, that the school 
facilities with some adjustments were adequate to offer 
the training, that present personnel with some additions 
were qualified, that some equipment and supplies would have 
to be procured, that standards of admission to this 
program would have to be established, and that the 
plastics institute should be administered by the school 
authorities with the assistance of an Advisory Committee. 

6. The report was submitted to the Director of the 

Vocational Division for his consideration and subsequent 
action. 

The Director and Supervisors met with the Leominster School 
Committee and the report was discussed with the members present. 
Questions of State approval, reimbursement, and other matters were 
interpreted by the Director. favorable reactions were in evidence 
and plana are now under way to establish a plastics training institute 
in this oommun ty. 

There was a marked decrease in the number of veterans 
requesting assistance from this service. Of those interviewed, many 



i 

■ 



were seeking information end assistance concerning their next 
ate;.- in their plans. Some had taken high school subjects needed 
to satisfy college entrance requirements and were planning to enter 
college; others were interested in vocational or technical training 
and sought information as to schools best equipped to give this 
training and the procedures for enrollment in those sohools. A 
number of recently discharged veterans were interested in learning 
the extent of the educational provisions of the G, I. Bill of Rights 
and the means of taking advantage of them. In all, 471 veterans 
were interviewed as compared to 1672 last year. It appears that as 
the majority of Massachusetts veterans have now made plans and are 
in school or training, the aount of time to be devoted to this 
activity will decrease appreciably during the ooming year. 

The Adult Education Council of Greater Boston continued during 
1946 and 1947 its survey of adult eduoation in this area. Among the 
fields of education under consideration was that of "Educational 
Opportunities for Veterans." This Supervisor was seleoted as chairman 
of the sub-committee assigned to study this phase, a thorough study 
was made by this committee, the findings were evaluated, and a report 
with specific recommendations included was prepared and submitted to 
the Council for its consideration and aotion. 

Contacts were made with superintendents of schools, vocational 
school directors, high school principals, and school counselors to 
assist them in organising guidance programs which provide functions 
to include all lerel. or the school system. The results of these 



183 



meetings were fruitful. A guidance program was organised at 
Shelburne Falls; Southbridge Trade School expects to get under 
nay in the Pall; and Chioopee has been selected to develop a 
pilot guidanoe program under the provisions for vocational 
guidance inoluded in the George-Barden Act during the coming 
school year. 

Continuing our efforts to promote the establishment 
of organised guidance services, several visits were made to schools 
having comparatively little organized serivees or operating programs 
whioh provide for limited funotions with inadequate personnel both 
as to numbers or possessing proper training and qualifications. 
Outlines of complete guidanoe services and the needed personnel 
were presented to the school administrators for their consideration. 
A keen interest was shown in the propositions offered with a promise 
to give the matter further study and to follow the preliminary 
talks with other discussions in the Fall. The service of the State 
supervisory staff was placed at their disposal. 

Cooperating with other supervisors of the Vesational Division 
of the Department, objective tests were administered to applicants of 
the teacher-training classes to aid in the initial screening of the 
candidates. A total of 71 candidates were tested at Boston and 
Fitohburg. Tests were also administered to the members of a foreman 
training olass at the Indian Motorcycle Company at Springfield. The 
purpose was to assist in determining procedures for the seleotion of 
personnel for this type of training. These activities are oonduoted 
by the Supervisor of Teacher-Training. 






. 



eJ 



1 64 



"The Use of Standardized Objective Tests to Measure the 
Effectiveness of Instruction" mis the subject disoussed with 19 
members of the Zone Sohool Instructors, Massachusetts Zone School 
for Firemen, at Brookline. The ways and means of using such tests 
were described. This program is under the supervision of the 
Supervisor of Teacher-Training of the Vocational Division assigned 
to Publio Servioe Oooupations. 

The Board of Collegiate Authority of the Department of 
Eduoation has the responsibility for approving on-the-job training 
programs under the G. I. Bill of Rights. This Supervisor assisted 
this service by investigating organizations who sought approval 
for on-the-job training programs related to the field of guidance 
or personnel work. 

Assisting the Director of Secondary and Elementary Schools 
of the Department, an analysis was made of the objective tests which 
had been administered to the pupils of grades 3 to 8 of the Choate 
Sohool, Essex. The procedure employed was to compare the results 
obtained from the intelligence tests with those of the reading and 
vocabulary tests to measure the progress made in reading by each 
class, and to suggest methods of identifying weaknesses and to 
institute procedures that will lead to pupil adjustments in this 
subject. 

Other activities were devoted to serving on various 
committees , attend ng meeting and conferences, - such as those 
sponsored by the U.S.Offioe of Education at Boston to study the 
provisions of the George-Barden Act and the Regional Conference 
of State Supervisors of Occupation 1 Information and Guidance held 
at lew York - and rendering servioe and assistance to individuals 
t*io oalled at the office in quest of such assistance. 






- 






185 

*he KaoeneiMortt* * ««i*lff.<a*r» In the 19&7 *e*eloe snow'ed 
flfeaptcr X5 of tho Gemorel lour* by the ftdeist ian of Chapter 4£*, Ante 
of 19*7 . Ili Act «*ftnMiehi»ft A Beard of Education ^h&di Shall Howe 
Supervision and Control of the £>©p«rti»ent of ^duontlom." Thi* act 
was approved Juno '8, 1947# to be effective September ?6» 19*7 • 

fhe function of tho ^e*oeim*atte nirlwien of Vocational 
Rehabilitation !« to provide a«*vioo to handicapped young people and 
adult* when they are In need of epoei&l preparation for ewpleyment. 
?o distinguish it frees tbp work done for tho veterans, It 1« new sane* 
ttnot called "Civilian BeheMUtatlea" and, beeaa*e It van originally 
tot up primarily to »?iv* re-training to mat. and women who had boom 
injured In tho course of tholr enploynent, it* full title ft ill res* in* 
"Vocational K*h*bi ?.ltutlon for J»ereon« -IsaMed in Industry or otMrwi**". 

Alt* ough a Maesaehusctte agency vithln tho Itepartaont of ^donation, 
the division derive* it* funng to provide needed «»rvie*« to client* 
equally fron tho Ptato budg*t provided -nan-lly by tho Maieoehueetts 
Legislature and fron red-ral appr:ipri*ti<m* administered through the 
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in tho Federal Security Ageney, 

Since 19^3 the Barden-LaFellette Aaendaent, known ae Public law 113, hae 
permitted tho eoste of adainl staring the program to be paid In full froa 
Federal appropriation*. 

It is difficult la ■ <rlnf outlln* to fir* a satisfactory icturo 



16b 

»t tho m#a& phaao* of elrllioa r«h b* it ti-m. Sho dlrorslty of 
probloao prooantod h leant a for aonrieo noeotaitetoo n p^is-wjp^ 

•o-^roaeh, and «i«h progma of odrlsaaeat, i&yeleal ro«t-*ratinn, 
training* or nlaoauant la der«lor>od 90 nM. individual boot* toward 
the <rnnl of »*sti«f»Morjf wr-lojnra**t. *feo rehabilitation proceao 
b*?lna iaaoAlatoly aftor r#forml whan tho poroon taforrai or aopiy* 
i»# for torvieo is lntorrloved and glma a full *tory of his or har 
background In teraa o? aducotion, industrial ojQ>ori*neo t one* thn 
history and pTaoont status of the ▼eeatlsnal disability no tha client 
understands It. ?hl« aurre-<-int#rrtow nroaldoo the rehabilitation 
aeanselo* vith an opportunity to too nrebloae froa the applicant* a 
o«n point of riov and to toll hia about tho service* of tho tfi vision 
and tho rmrpeae of vocational rehabilitation, 00 th»t ho latelf 
will understand tho reason for tons of tho steps that follow the 
Initial planning m* 00 ready to cooperate oathe plan novee forward, 
%eb applicant 1« then required to undergo a. general Medical examine* 
tinn by tho doctor or clonic of his ova • holeo; tho cost beln/r net. 
If necessary, by reh.,bl21t%tl * funds. It It eleav that in tho eaoa 
*f direct roforralo froa hoerital* ooao aedieal Inforuntinn eorcem- 
iiy* tho el loot any already have boon sent to tho division. In orory 
la«taaeo It uu«t ooror tho ra*juirenenta of tho divisions own fora 
Ohio* provides for a ganoral aedlcel examination, a checking of 
▼l«loa ««nd haaring, JCtee* T>*eseare reading, and certain laboratory 
taete, Tho doctor la esfered to efaeek ■ Hat of nayaleal aotlvltiot la 
regsJrd to any raooaaoadod llaltatlena for hi a p tisnt. Ho olao la 
aeked to give a full diagnosis of disabilities cad to uake reeeaaeav'atlaae 
for farthar aodleal nd surgical eare «e ho haa ebaTved nooit during 



1 6 

the examination* A, further nodical exa»lnation to re#ar>* to ths 
vocational handicap itself Is often secured, especially *hen further 
nedieal sure scans l^l^t^ for the allevl tlon or r«»T»l of the 
disability or In eases where special precautions Are need** to 
protect the client's health* these exaatoatin?:* are then reviewed 
by e nedi«*nl consultant one? the ease considered In terns of eligibility 
end feasibility. Flees for carrying out the rseennantlatlon* of the 
physician are often node at this tine end nay develop tote « pregren 
that le priaurlly en* of physical restoration vita eventual placement 
to anploymcnt alleys reuatoing the objective* Shis rathar lengthy 
description of the r quired diagnostic nodical Information haf been 
Siren here because* during the 19^6-47 period corered by this report* 
the staff of the division tare made careful efforts to scour* the 
nodical data that pertains to the physical condition of ghelr clients 
nad to appreciate the needs th?-t these nedlenl findings Indicate. 
Ae l^ter rutragrapht to the report will «how, n*dica\, surgical, 
nsyohlatrlc, and hospital enr» to reaeve or reduce dlsabl ltles nay be 
IJiltsnaasi with rehabilitation funds If clients themselves are unable 
to pay for sue* servioeet sn<i prosthetic devices, such as artificial 
I labs, trusses* braces* end hearing aide* are bought for clients if 
they ore seeded ts Increase work onpseit/, and if other financial 
resources ere not available for their purchase* The reh billtatlen 
ttnff have Is .mod through experience nuoh about artificial appliances 
and can bs of eeseatlal serviee even though n client is hinself nest- 
ing- the full cost of en appliance* The traditional service of vocational 
rehabilitation Is th-.t of providing eeeatlonnl trninlng to a ulp n 
nan or won n to l*m a Job thrt is eosipatlbl* vtth hie 



168 

ftt her physical Il»tt; tl«ft» &ad by this man«, to sake esr^titioa 
vtth «B*teJodi«a.e?ee' wrkers a possible and wholesome exp*rienee. 
!J»lik* the solieiss goTomln^ the prerision of ishysleal restoration 
s^rrieos, thorn is no infuiry into whether the client can hla*elf 
afford to ^»y for * training course* and the division arovies train- 
ing vbenwr it is elear t hsjt *»ch tr-inia^ *ill be of r»e»itlve 
service ia a r«B*»bllttati^ ttlaa regard 1^4 **>layts nt. Once the 
hs«dioappod r«T*Qn i« satisfactorily prewar«l # plrtceasnt beecw-s a 
•attar of obtaining I suitable Job vlth an en-ploy r nho i« willing to 
eeepornto with the division »ad &Lle«r the h&aitlo&nped person to urove 
als abil ty to do the work for which ho has been trained.. It ia 
oftaa aenaaenry for ths refeaailitatisa wt>*rfioor to talk over the 
*<eafai situations *lth aa employer so th«t ha understands the reason 
for tho aaa v s need for a w^*!*d of &djtt?taenfc when he fir*t begins 
tho job. Thus it will bo teen th*t aa employer eaa bo given helpful 
instructl4n* in Aaaling with tho deaf and hard of hearing ia t*>ras 
of lip reading or in Baking minor adjustments la t+kat* to tho 
ortho^edleslly handicapped. Vh«a, aftor roeolTlng services of trln- 
tag or physical restoration through tho dlvlalen, a ana or woman 
sstabll sties aa sereUtr cajvaeity by remaining satisfactorily enrol ~>yed for 
a period of over thirty days, ho or olio Is amid to bo rehabilitated. 

In ordor to eirve all parts of the State adequately, tho dlvirion 
aov has offloas in six hay cities «s veil as ia the ""tate Udmeatlea 

Billdln* ia Hasten* Tburing the nerlod covered by this report, a nee 
district o'flee vns sot ar- In Lo -ell la Psoenber 19*6, that Insuring 
eloser eenteet vlth atjgr towns In Middlesex and eases throughout 
toes* Ceurty. 

Physical restoration servloes, when indicated by aedleal 



9 69 



expiation, gfe. .mTtdert *jy th«* <*iTi«len t» oli«mt« with ntfttte 
ditabi 1 lti*t «*M*?h r* relatively ttahle or tlo^ly progreetiwe 
end IMM flaanoi*! n*«*d Has been <?.ot«rainea. iSwrjr apinl leant for 
rehabilitation reeetwea tedteal <U*t#netl* and reeatlonal ^liMmliw?. 
At a r**&t *if the l?***l*t t«T**t lotion vfcida inolttdet * nodical 
•jrwiinstlia, 1% It A*%*rstQ*t whether the asrelieitnt reoulret any 
obyelesl r- , s%9ystta« Pltlff et *e»rt of tht -eb*bilitatioa nlan, 
The eedlr-el eeno»>t»»t wist leeldt that th* ellent hit * disability 

wbieh «e* bt re*et#d ©*• jli'tililfl' ^fthln & reatenablt length of tt*e 
to th*t |m » -r IM *ade ready for vocational training end the eapley- 
nent objective. 

fh* *'rr*f#t are 'onrefcaoed by the diri*ion end are rendered 
to the fl&Uwta I* bof»1*»»lt or etl**r *£enclet la the e.oasnnlty by 
local rbyiei*** «r<? MtJpWM who *#ree to T*artteit>ate In the vrtHprnm 
ta-* c*rf fir too eMent ender the dirialon* • e-"proved Pl*n snd fee 
Schedule* MuRdtaftil en* retnode of ^reeednre hare been to* wi> -*it,h 
the tpnroval of the -.«*eff«*«il*nal adrl»ory eeatrtttee to which *re 

<*t«ted elT »-»*l*w*l aeeeelattont hawing to flo with tho T?reritlr«n 

of aedloal cert* *fe* choiea *»n<3 nrefer«wiee of tht client and hit 
feeily T^bytioliO in regard to tol^eti^ of epeciallatt tad hotpltalt 
art con*idered etrefatly an* the nhyat clan- irvt lent relatlonehlo end 
eonti&ulty ef qedleal eare ratcheted within th« *toa' *rdt of the 
diTitioi* 1 !; Plan* 

Sat tt thr lwff nttnber *f nodical «xnn1r tlonc *»d leer et ted 
eaaeleed, it wat fovad ncaoeeary to decentralira ttid to entebltah 
nadln*! rTr» 'trtW pottIca* in the *l«tri*t offices. Thete nodical 
•onto.? twit « r*m "reliable for eon-nltatiwi with the vocational eeoneelora 
in tht dtttrlct of fleet and, by thit neant, th« work hat been neoel«tmted 



aftfl « tetter nader steading of dlr«M - iti«e nehiewod. 

Grtho #<?i« condition* hare iredoalnnted In physical restoratiea 
eerwieet ehleh appear* to 1m the trend throng tut the country. «aay 
other type* of aedical ear* h«we fc*ea provided, v ew*wor t including 
heriotealos* np«v»tl4B« for variance vein*, fenestration operation*, 
a#rw* # ehr«t, «u! plastic, aurgery. In certain ea«e*« ppyehijatric 
treetaant. dental traataeat, «a<? speech therapy ale© h*w* heen fumUh^, 

fhe prevision of nroathetic appliance* eonttitnto* a l^rge taction 
of Tthyeieal restoration **vviee* and the need fee instruction In the 
««• of ertlfirl^l era* end lege hue heen apparent. Ae e reenlt 
of a conference with official* of the Mcaeaahacattt Sonera! Hornltal 
arraagear'nte were nad* to eead ceee* for when artlf iri l «ra* wad left 
were ftimlahed hy the dlwieloa for In traction in their u«e et the 
Depertaeat of ?'hy*!eel Medicine of that hospital* fhi* aerrlee 
w«t begaa oa J-mt ry 1, 19*17 and fifteen weenie have heen eeat for service 
einee th-t tine. 

definite nreredarw* with the Arthritic J-rogrwn of the Metaeefcaaette 
Denartaeat of Pehiic Health h«we heea ••taaliahed for referral ef 
patient* for ropatinnpl reh^bmtntl^i aarrlcc* after their ttedieel 
rare h»« heea c*#ml*ted under th t oregraM* Am a reeult t oeeperitlve 
arrange* e n t* here heea a»de hereby the aedloal *eei 1 werker et the 
*ae B *a hn «ctt* •aaeral Heeoitel where the erthriti* regraa la adain- 
i*teree a coolant* the Division when * p*r*en ie reedy for veeatlnaal 
planning end a vocational eoun*alor interview* the preteeetlve client 
at the el lain. 

nnnfereneea h«v* heen hel<" with hawuital* and ether aediael ogoadee 
throughout the =*t*te enaeeralv: the working oat of nroeedaree for 
nhy«%al r««t*ratloa «erviee*. 



I7i 



A ttudy by * et»da*t »ade in the division on tuberculosis easoo 
of th* five years, 19&0-&5, v*» used «• the raeteriial for a thesis 
la piartial fulfillment of the degree of Haeter of Science in the 
Steams College School of fecfi rk. *B»e title «e» *9He 
ttehabilitntlon of the Arrested iuliaonary Tuberculosis Patient In 
the Hate of Mnarnchueette*. ¥be division stands rea^r to eaejpepete 
with the schools foP social *erk 1» the training of their students. 









The Jtoasachusctts Mil fit* of Vocational Rehabilitation offers 
its eerviees to «11 who are eligible and feasible* aaa fata? individuals 
therefore apnly for servlees for theaeelves op for f rieade and relatives. 
A fair largo? naafcer, hevever, am referred by too Departnent of 
Industrial *oei< s e*ts, school*, bespit? Is, oiinies, tuberculosis *nd 
othor health associations, public welfare «nd health d er.nrtmcnts, 
nubile end private eanloyswwt offices, social agencies working -<lth the 
preblea* of fannies and child en, and many other group? in the comnimlty. 

la accordance with the 1** by hich the revision of Voeati ual 
Ml i tat ion vat first not us, the olosest csperatlon the division 
a- intaln* 1* tk t with the Denertaent of leftist rial Aeeidente* A aaa 
or voboa who lnemre In the cr-uree of eapleyaent an injury suff lci*ntly 
seriate to suggest to the ; euertaent of Industrial Accident t the need 
for a nee occupation before he or she caa re-establish an earning 
capacity Is referred to the division for tfui'-*nee, planning, aaa re- 
training. 

Certain othep nubile agencies have elo«e cooperation vith the 
division. Sy egreeaant, the Crippled rhildren's services refer young 
people of aanloyahle nee who appear to need training or other eenrieee 
that eaa be rendered by the !>i vision of Vocational XeheblHtetloa. 



i dSt 



furnishing to the division at the tlae of referral portisefct nodical 
reeoanfladatloae aa<i tnforsatl-m. Also by .«green\ent* th* state ^lojr- 
a«eit Off lee, f lading « handicapped applicant for ennloyMftt la aeed 
of epnel*llsiea > reaebt Iltati « service, each a« the raaeMnl of o vorn 
artificial appliance or & braeh»up coarse In one of the tradee, rofara 
the applicant to the divieiors aad cooperate* in leter placement 
*ervlece after tho divides hag ewrvad tho applicant* Tbo a*rl«So» 
la it* torn con salt* tho Stato Snpleyaeat Service *hcn a trainee io 
reedy fa* eapleyacat. A cooperative agreeaont betveen tho division 
mud tho nepartaeat of Pablla *elf*re pondte tho division to reboot 
that tho r **pariaaat of r-ublic olfare determine tho financial »»edo 
of every appllc&at for aalateaanee during training. 

Tho division acy bo considered no a reaaaalty resource for helping 
othor eeelal agendo*, both public an 4 nrlveto, vhoa they stoat rsronlea* 
la vhicfc physical and nantal dieabilitlee are Important factor* la 
eoenoato ooouritr or personal happiness. Yh»ee agencies la turn »ro~ 
vide nany laportant eoployaont service* to rehabilitation train eee* 
A faaily society air oak that a he jring aid bo provided for tho father 
of a fondly vfeea his Job 1« throeter>edi by increased lose of hearing 
or It nay saggect, booaaoe oa eapleyemt handicap la p recent, that 
tho principal vage>-eeraer la a faally town to tho agency be give* 
special training to seeaure oa occupational license if this vlll oooB 
gr ntor security ear* a higher rate of pay, and tho society way thoa 
during training giro support until the client hao eoaplsted ale course, 
A hospital that intends to fellow a yon - voaan patient na^lrrlly 
■ay tarn to the division in ordor that train 'ag for tho tedontary Job 

mtm Mitl ^ ■ i ton \ mm bjMptiri M N**i felt *1 M * *to ••Hy 

look forward to future «>«ralnrs erea «eay aeath* ahead* Physloal 



?3 



restoration eorriflee hey amtOBteti colly drum nodical eoelal worker© 
Into elooor vorfciBc M&attoat with tho dlTiBioR. ithout the loyal 
holp and eoopWiti^a of tho msay int*r*#t«d egoaeio* tho dlrlsioa 
ootid a»t carry *b it* wsrte for to* handlearpod. 

Xn ia«4l»47 ^lth tho etoetdy rise of living coeto, fall a*o boo 
boob n&ao of tho dirtei;** 1 * "• iatoaoBco ftta^s. ffrero fmdo aro 
^▼Ido©" to tho dtrtetoa by law *«o th*t waiat*»«Bno caa ho furnl«hod 
roh'*bilit*ttrm tratnooo *ho» oireoawtBaeoo iodic; to thin opcclal aood. 

!buri»^ the j< -or ©BdiB* <lu»o **0» 19*7* flrtooa <»T?pH<?*ttefi* for 
•olat.'wtRnco woro fflod with tho ftiriwioa of Toettiraiel Noh*bllltatloB. 
Tlfteea a»«lir«»ti <n* woro ofta-rovo* by tho T)eperB«ont of Public velfaro, 
and obo application wbo ^.«B'*tire7^. 

Mmtlon oat aado 1b tho divi stoa** report for tho floeol yo*r 
ob<*1»/* Jaao 10, 19*6 of eortolB chango* 1b th* content aad ferraagoaeBt 
of tho tt*tl«tio*l tablet fro* thote ehown to *rll«r annual reports* 
Tho throo statistical toblee showa 1b last JVtfr** report for tho 
fir ft tiae hare boon continued 1b thlt *-eport. tpble III - Report of 
Serwiees — h«» boon expended t li year to show norrleos provided, by 
tho division or s«eured without coot. 

uriB« tho fiscal yoor July 1, 19*6 to too **>, 19*7. 417 por»<mo 

were placed iB tr« Iflla^ by the division a. kin* o total of 5.5*? training 
*Tt$r*n* froa *n*ast 1921 to d*te. 

raoh y*<r ■ «tudy hae Boob Bade of person* placed in eaoloywmt 
aad -aV-blHti'ted durinf that year for tho pnrpove of eoaparln* their 
earning power boforo aad aftor thrlr case© were referred, to tho 



1 



MfeeMlltatftoa Piricioa, £ariag th» fiscal year ©a£la#? Amm *30 # 19*7, 
H6 *ereea» www elatelfied »« reh bllltatee V the <?lris ton aakiag 
a total m»b«r of 5,*95 ««**«»* rehabilitate* frea 'm^uet I9?i td 
*»e T&» 19*7. 

for th« group rehabilitated during the above ts«ri«>a t the arerafO 
weekly *a£0 at the date of refereaee v&« $7.53 ae aflaia*t $31.95 
after rahabUitatioa, shotting an laereaee of £34**2 w week, per 
e«plta, or the eua of 3*01, ?69.** for the eattre number. Hie total 
annual ^arnia- * for the group asrmnt to $525,00?. *0. 

9ho 89 eeeu»atieao for vhieh training erne *>mri<*ed for *17 
trainee* darin/? the nerlod #aly 1* 19**, to June T» 19*7, iaelude 
the following! 



liOnuntant 
Aircraft Keehante 
Anlaal ^«beadrruea 
•rehtteet 

*rtt«t, "torwrelal 
Attendant 3urte 
Autoaebiln Initios Waa 
utoaoblle Heehaaie 
AateaeeUe Painter 
Aateaebile Spray Pniater 



B«nefc tferker 
binder 



Meehlne 



*effer 
C^bln t 
OOrp enter 



Cheat et, Textile 

oierk 

Cl«rk, credit late 

clerk, rile 

Clerk, offlee 

Clerk, tteek 

Cl«rk-Typiet 

-leer »epali 

"leek and at ok Kepairaaa 

•em- > totter operator 



'r»ft«mo, Meehnaieal 
.nroeeaekrov 
itaelaeer, Cheateel 
lasineer, ?<eehanleal 
la^inoer, ^ationary 
rireana, natioaarr 
*loral Seetaaer 
Furniture ^olieher 



Heirdreeeer 

Heating, Air Vm'tUonin*, 
?entilatia« In -taller 
Jeweler aad Craf t«nen 
Jewelry Tttp -lraea 
Jouranllst 
Jtejr Pane* Operator 
MhmrlAB 
tine type opomter 
Lip Header 



■■«ntal Mjreiealfft 



NaomUitt 

Mink Wanoker 
Painter 
Pattern Maker 
Phnranelet 
Phete "elerer aa6 
Photographer, Geoaerelal 

Poaltryana 
reeeer and npetter 

Printer 



tnuoher 












'*•• 






'. 










l«tlelaa*« Helper 
HaAte Hepalraaft 



^aleeaaa, Adwtlslae* 
3*leea«a, Pristine 
Secretary, Saerntlee 

oeretary, ?)*flee 
flfceat aatal Serfcar 
*hoe flatter 
Shee ftepelraaa 
Shew r are Writer 

1-n lr- Iff Mrf ettorer 
?tlteher. Html aaA Maaatao 



feateC- Aaaoaaaer 

fciteiier. Fewer Haehlae 
5vltchboar<§ Operator 
Teaehere* A*^« «»<* "rafta 
TMthir, Bone conoade* 

Id mIm»i HMMpimMi 

feehalclaa, ^atal 
Teeh lola, X~Bay 
1>*ol Crib .-\tt«ftfl«a% 
frhel^terar 

Ueteh Aaeeably and Repetraaa 
Vateh Ttepelraea 
«oe4wor1cer, *eehlne 



Tao eaeee otted below were fenova to the Dtwlatea of relational 
Rehabilitation earia* the aerie* y*ba-t<?a7. They bel-ag to the nanber 
traeeeoefally rehabLlltatee' Serine th« period cowered ay thle 
report* 

A ^iceaara««tf jroaag a«a, ?i*, «ene ta the office at the eaggoatloa 
ef aa lnsar«aeo eoanaay. *v»rly a y«ar >>efo**e he h«$d beea tnjarefl *hen 
he wea werktrm: aa a paper ratter and hatf Xe*t the greater part of hie 
right head, retalaiag o?ly tho thaab n«? wrl of the Index finger. 
The oaparrlffor who talked with hla fmaV th«fc be wat nt*ll hlc to 
rraap firmly * raa er aaaetl aad, la eeaaaatlng aa thin, <Hocorared 
th*-t the yieag aea bed always baa aa aaaeaal latareat la rawing, 
part leal arty ae It r*l.»ied to drafting, eed far ae*rly three /Mara 
at a hobby hn* mtteaoed create* elaeaee la draft lag »t a teahnlaal 
school, | full- tin* ln<*t*i'*e*ll-«.' tralalag »re*raa waa thareafter 
vorfcad oat by %ha dlrtolea *lth aa* of th# Inrger raeail^a-vl lohoels 
ef the state, aa* the yoa*g *** teak ap "refttag «a<J l«yeet la «era*tt. 
The Inaarnaoe eo*rv<ay, el*eee4 to h*we hla fix ea mi objeettre, rea- 
tlaeod lta paye«et of aonneaMtlen, After a year** tn»inla*, the 
aaa wea place* with aa a*wertl«tag «*oni.->ay «har« the oaplayer 






. 



recognised hi* ability. E© himself, however, felt rather insecure 
abcut how well he could handle seme special lettering jobs tjvit were 
to he given him later, and the division felt that he would profit 
from practice at a small private evening school vhere fee could dis- 
cuss hie work-prohleras. Tuition at such a school was paid by the 
division for about three months* The young men is now earning 
$32. 00 a week as a layout Ban. 

COKBIBASIOH TIUIKXgg 
Beef from birth, a "boy, 16, returned to his home from a hoarding 
school for the deaf. Though a geod lipreader, he had little speech. 
His family 1 * efforts to set hia into a local vocational school with- 
out success brought then to the Division of Vocational Sehanilltatlon. 
I crirefttl selection of trade schools was then wade so that the ooy*s 
special interest In cabinet making could "be developed. Arrangements 
for his entrance Into this trad* school as a rehabilitation trainee 
were sad* by the division with en understanding headmaster. Through 
the drafting done is connection with the cabinet making the hoy 1 8 
special talents for drawing were discovered, as he made a successful 
school adjustment, his vocabulary and speech improved. He attended 
this trade school for three years, working during the summer months 
in woodworking and cabinet making shops and graduating with special 
commendation on his drafting ability. The school placed him at a 
cabinet making shop and the division arranged for hira to have an 
evening course in architectural drafting at a large technical school. 
Special help from the rehabilitation counselor was given the teacher 
in dealing with th* student nt this school, and the division paid the 
coat of the tuition. 3nc nraged by the excellent report from this 
advanced course, the rehabilitation counselor next interested an 
architect in taking the deaf nan on for full-time employment 



l7o 






177 



tral lag. A doily tuition vat paid by the division for four aontfat 
and after tb*t teetlag r*rlod, tho yeaag «** continued In eanloyaeat 
training et&tae for thf> raaai&der of the year, revolving salary frea 
the eempaay. Ho It bow employed full tiae aoeeeaarlly •till moor 
aaperrieioa but bow allowed to #l$a his aaae to verk doae for tho 
eaeteaere. Hit preeeat n*alaal waga of $25,09 vill iaereate at it 
•kill preret hi* aore valuable to hit employer. 



Rofofrotf or tho doctor who had earud for hor vhea tho hod 
rheumatic favor ot tho «ge of nine, o *irl, 18 /omro old, eaae to tho 
d Initios with hor ann-Uagiiflh epaaklag aether. She hod hooa Alowod 
to leave eeheel oa her eixteeath birth >y aad h«d ot oaao begum a 
factory Job that proved ton exhauttin* for her to eoatinao it, A 
torlofl of Jobt had all ended oa tho a ao note, pad tho doctor roforrod 
hor in tho hope that tho might bo trained for o tedemtary Job v le* 
the enuld tofaly hoi''. She t eeme d to h ve llttlo positive intoraot 
or choice oo to eeea attorn, aad It tooaod bott to tho rohabllitatloa 
adrioar oho tolkod with her to arrange a veeat tonal toet, *hit 
•moved the girl«« aanipul»tlve thlllt to bo daflaltoly oa r.ertor. 
five aoatht of traiaia^t oeld for by tho divltioa, at a oholtorod 
•hop rooultod la hor beooaimg okillod la power oaofclae tt it eh tag, a 
oaoll vaga bolag paid aria* tho tralaiag prograa. At tho oad of that 

period, oho vat ploaod in the eovlag rota of a r toll etoro where oho 
eerat tth.OO weekly aador oeealleat working eoadltloat. 



A ?5-yeor old aaa oaaloyoi la o foundry vat badly burned ot work. 






' 



78 



Meet eariome were the lnjoriee to hie lege and feet. The Division of 
TeentionoX ftehaeiUtaftion learned of »hi« eose when. In aeeor^anee 
with the peltry eft wo hy the two effieee, ftfao JtennftaeBft of Incfeetriel 
Aeeldente eenft hi* Bono to the division* sixty doye affter the ooeidenft 
cftatia* fth t ho hod heen nnshle to rrto.ni to aooloyneftt. 4 rer>reeonft- 
aftlre of tho divieion celled on tho nan tm* lafter talked with hie 
enpleyer oho expressed o wUlingeoee to noire eay edjueftnenfte fthoft 
womld facilitate ftho «e*'e return to work, hot it required nearly two 
years of hy«ieal ©ere end a ettlee of shin graffta heforo ho eoold 
return to tho «la*t. Ho ome esiMned to work -e « nreefeeftion clerk 
eat woo ehli«ed to ho o» hi* foot wary little. Uafortanetsiy, tho 
nlaftft hod to eoepond hueineee o year or en X- tor duo to pe«t»wer re- 
ergani ration, end tho yonnc u*#, unable to ftoke eft* Job shaft required 
continuous "ftendtiyr, woe lofft without work. Ro rooeoh ere d hie hriof 
earlier eoftftooft wifth ftho division and returned fto oak fthoir help* A 
high eehool gradaefte, he h^pe* that it weald %o possible for hia fto 
train for o oeeeifU Job where ho would not ho oft en* dleadveateffo oa 
eeeouat of hie hettdicna, *tth the help of ftho United nates Inpley- 
moot office, ftho rehabilitation eoeneeler feuad «» t ruining enperftaaity 
for him oft e loeol print ehop end ar ran g e d to » >y tuition to tho 
■iQjiefty while tho room* n»n learned fto eperete a iftoft/po neehine. 
■o reaalaei in tr tain* for o period of twenty aonthe and by th t tioo 
woe euffleieaftly ekilled fto ho reftoinod or the tr-lning -gency re o 
foil- tin* linotype «& rotor oft o weekly wage of MA.OO. 



A serried ana, *?, with eix children *a* referred fto tbo division 
hy ftho United «tatec Senln/oee Ooeneoeatloa Aoaateeien. urinj: the wor 






mf , .i^mF 



1 

ho had boon onployod mi g >rifniin nt \forr *nd eiainod ho ha* oequirod 
ft double html* in th# lino of duty ».t tho plant. Witfoneo, fcoworor, 
oould not oubstuutinto this clnln, and at two tino of his roforral 
ho *ao vorVintf no a tani-oab driver undor tho handionn of eonoidorablo 
pain ohioh frocuontXy obligod him to stay nauy from wi«r with onnonqttont 
loos of Inoomo for tho support of Mo faulty. On aoemmt of Ma nany 
financial roopoftoihilttioo* ho vno unabto to afford tho ©juration 
olid hospitalisation vhloh nould corroet tho hernia. Tho division 
agreod to carry tho coot of thooo soodod sorriooo. **aM«£ on unoront- 
rul roeorory, ho was Ohio to rotas* to onwloyaont throo nontho of tor 
tho eaomtion nod now oamo on arara^o of &JO.OG o woo%* 

whou a> young woman, 29 yoam old, ojooloyod &* » el*rk~cnsM*r, 
flrot tolhod oror hor diffioultios with o rohnHIUtotlon ©ounsolor, 
duo did oo booauso hor doctor hod told hor oho should not tontine* 
to ooao to Mr* for fnrthor oloctrleal tmntnonto sines thoy oould 
both ooo thoy «*ro not Imroring hor condition. Sho f olt fri^htonod 
and holploao m& wan ;n«To*<in£ly iambi* to m£k* Although oho was a»l# 
to do hor worte at tho offleo, oho wno (growing dooomdont upon t&3&~enb» 
slnco mho emnld no longor stop on to otroot oero and ton***** $h© was not 
ohle to olinb stairs unions thorn woro ).m®r? bftnnistors, an^ oh* amid not 
rioo fron * ohair with**** stww&nl holn* It m» oHdont thot it «M«nt ooon 
bo diffloult for hoar to rotain hor «J«h. a ohonlr with that laxgo hospital 
whom alio had boon, trmtod in tho *ut<«o&H*ttl &*na?ttto&t ss&o yoar* boforo 
*h©w*d tho diagnosis to bo oitntwotf. f*j*ormi nosftn nalny and roro^lod that 
a not* on tho rooord st&tod that* if thorn wera no ^aprofwnont -ithia tho 
noact f*w taoatfao of tho tin* of hor rlsit, surgsry would robnbly bo ad- 
Tisoblo. As tho young wosaa hod not roolisod tho teort&no* of hor roturn 
to tho hospital, sho hod not boon thorn for many month*, fho rohabilitstion 



worker V pereoaal pereUttsion aunaeedetl in getting her to riiro to 
the hospital for further «xa»la$tien, though the yeuag wnan was 
reluctant to do so. At the hospital debtor* ad vised that a transplant 
ef Muscles la the thigh should ha doae at seen e* she could g*t 
leave ef ahaonng ffan her Job. Entirely deneadeat u**>a her e ruing* 
and under constant espouse for special transport- t lea, the young 
voaaa h*d been ? hie to enenire i little or an ©crings anil eeonoaioelly 
was therefore la need ef fWnolal halo for the proposed orv rat Ion, 
The dlrlsloa therefore nseaaed the cost of surgery aad heepttaliir&tlen 
and la tor , ae she «r«w veal enough to lemea the hospital * eoavaleteent 
care la a unrein* hone* fhe diriaien furnished transportation to and 
frea the hospital during a period ef eevrel weeks as that she could 
hare the Jiysieal therapy reeeamended by the dorters end this alee 
was paid far by the division. 1 2b* surgical operation and subsequent 
treataaat aeeeanltehed ererythtttf- the doctor hm>cd it *euld. :be 
returned to h«* Job with the e<°curity th*t *he had net felt pre- 
viously. She le new able to *r*eu about so that only the nr»0tleed 
eye aaa sea difficulties ia gait, and she Is sale to use while con- 
vey meee wit 'oat anxiety. Physical restoration serwteee thus reha- 
bilitated tale youar: wanR ay ea sling h«r to eeatiaue in a Job at 
which she receives 192*00 a week. 

Rnndtca- nwd by a h x«-liT> nt* | «?.eeeh defect ^aus«d by | rlcft- 
nalate, e young weuau. ?5. worked la ■ eaell shop at aanger wages* 

eeaseious that, though she liked the work, she could net ask for 
better pay or full-»ttne eupleyft«eit aeenuee her handicap prevented her 
dealing with eustoaere satisfactorily, fine vas referred by a public 

school teacher to wh«a she had fane for eounsel. Arren#ea>*nt» were 

aade by the rehabilitation worker for h r to be eaealaed eedteally* 

end the findings •hewed that oerrAetlve operations would give her 






IBs 



bettor appoaraaee and probably battor raoooh. ?ha tilt of sargory 
and hospitalisation *»« aarriod by tho dtvlsioa a?t«r tt was shown 
th/rt aalth*r sho fear fcer faaily waald bo ftblo to ftanftta tha 
r« c sano n dod earn, fho a»*ratiaas wora aaaeaaofal, tha /mug «*aas*a 
prof il« aaoaaJUaiy batng laprovad. ^ad har t&iokonod apooofc baoaan 
wholly iatolligible* A poriod of sectional adjastaaat turnad mt to 
bo an iaportaat factor In this nana* Tha yowg woman wi«fcod to 
return to bar foraer job but for homo tin* maid not bria& herself 
to talk to her e^>loyer *b*nt being employed In better status with 
the eeapeny baes&se of her grantor eaaabilltie* fciaee the ©p*r*tf:i«ms» 
Hhm rehabilitation worker felt tfrot it was vital for hor to achieve 
this adjastaeat hereelf end urged the necessity anon h«r. At last 
she fait able to antes tha mewe» and the aapleyer gladly ro-eaoloyed 
h«r for longs? hours, glvlite?, bar awr* responsibility *ith a eaaseenent 
raieo la salary, she new osras $^*09 a weak in a job of selling 
which she likes and which sbn now handle* very vail *a* to tha phyti- 
0*1 restoration serrieee and tho we*£tltmal adjuetaeate furnished 
bar through tho division. 



Graduate af a high school* a /"an* «oa, 71 years old, vat 
handicapped by a pronounced saoliaslt for which a spinal faslon baa 
bona dona In two a Was. Be w»s referred by i> social vorkar who 
fait that tha work ho wee doing as a shikar van a haaard to hit 
futura hoslth. fha rahabilitatlnn supervisor was abla to intoroot 
several aaaaer* of tho eeanwaity in the young nan, and their interest 
lad to a tentative preaiee th-t ha weald soeuro work on a local wookly 
a^waparjor if ha woro traiaod a« an all-round printer, * flold of which 















. 






IBd 



he md an eleaeat&rgr )m&A*&#*m a 2fali-fci»»* pyogrns **« worked aut 
vitiwmt ceet in • *$«ei<d BflhaftX for the handicapped, while the 
f?irl«lon enrriet*. the ftiU eoet of Ms living <i*?ing the period fee wne 
In training vritiuwt weens* le reeminett in training for twelve sontfcs 
and et the end of ihats period the h^>«4-for jell ee&terl&lixed at n 
«•*• ef f?5,00 n veefe. 



fiscal Tosr *Ojr 1, 19*4 — *>*• 10, 19*7 



1. Qmw rmiring aomleoo. 1,6*1 

a* Wl0*M ~ roaabtiltiitod — nlaofiwat In oaplagrsottt 
following «;eme»», .......... %6 

ft. (3,9(194 — rohftMlitotlon eorrieo* — lnterviov* 

ooansoling, .guldfiMHU* 227 

c. 81o»«d — comioofl — not e»»l*yo4 boooato of 

a«r«oftal f-fttor*, illa«««, oagTatrfcto* * liability, 
ooatft,. 21 

4* O&oooi — tmanforrod to othf>r a^oney ............ 10 

•• 2,ivo»ea»o mil (In pne«u of rofcisbilltatioft 

onJut TO, 19*?) 1.067 

?• '>,«»§ rrffmd ««* olo»ft4 aftor tmr*«tl at Iab 572 

(omrleos 4oeliR«<!t »«rri«oo wt itooftod; iafllviAtel. aot 
*li/ribl#i lndlvtaaal aot «affiel«tttljr oanaovatlvo to Mate* 
ramtlUtatt»a poMiblo* lndlTt«tt«l noodle* htvImi 
nthar th«a motional rehabilitation, reform* to other 
a*«n<*iot-s tdgmtofir shifting by in<ftvlr*ttal) 

3* Caso« reform* - t*tu« aot detemlne*, 1,210 

?et4l. -> t k~i 














. 






184 

fA»» IX, 

SOURCES Of JOW CASUS 
fiiMl Tear July 1* 19*6 to Mt 30, 19*7 

1, Butinete milage... 18 

2, Private School 123 

3, Public school............ 72 

km School far H^dleappee' 18 

Xealtht 

1. Cripplee Ohlieren'e v-onoy 43 

2. State Mental Heepital 10 

3* fanereuleeis Seanteriaa or Association.... .... 83 

4, Marino Hospital or Soli of station 

(if* 8. Public Hralth Sarrice). • Hi 

$. Other Heepital or Clinic... •••«« 187 

6. Other Health Agency (Public or Private). •• 66 

7. Physician (not elsewhere ela«« if i«ble) 21 



0. 

1. Insurance Cofflpany... 10 

2. Bureau of Old-Age and Sarrtrera Insurance.................. 

3. State Werkaea^ Conpensation gency. ...... 341 

4. If. S. Sapleyeee* Oeapen«ation Oeamieeloa,... 100 

!>• alfaret 

1. Aaerlcen lea Crooe.... •• •• • • 5 

2. Public Welfare ^eney (state aa# local roTornaeat) ......... 71 

3. Private Welfare Agency 3& 

a. Other Gorrmnent Agencies* 

1. Selective "errice Cretan (including Local ^oarat) • $ 

2. State Teeetienal Rehabi Itat ion Agency......... 23 

3. B. S. aaplera-nt serrice 64 

4. Yetcfaao Aoalalatrailea.. • 17 

5. iferttiae ^acdeeioa 

(fornerl/ War Shtppiag A4alalftretioa) 1 

6. Pahllc Offloial (Local, ftate, anr Pederal — 

act eleeteteve classifiable).. 19 

7. tr.s. Civil ?ertiee Ooaatselen 1 

8. Other Ooveraaent Agency (net eleevhere classifiable) ...... • 12 

P. ffleeellaasouii 

1. Artifielnl Appliance Company... 15 

?. aaaloyer 13 

Labor Uhl^a* 4 

ftVve Ttaa, Publicity, ^'a<51o 85 

3. Other Inf)iri(*aal 73 

6. Pelf «-r«f erred (not elteohere elasslf iable) ................ . 97 

7. ' 'th^r , •..••••■••••......•.•.•..••..•••••••..•••«••..«.....» m 

tatal 1.675 



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S8Y 

AHHUAL 3EP0BT 

OF THE 

DIVISIOH OF UBIVBRSITY EXTEHSIOS 



Enrolments 

Total enrolments for the fiscal year of July 1, 
191*6 - June 30, 19**7 numbered 18,529. Of these 5,1#* 
were in correspondence courses and 13,395 in extension 
classes; 7,904 were paid enrolments while 10.625 were 
enrolments of students — including 9*732 veterans 
of World War II — to whom the Division is required 
by law to give instruction free of charge. 

The following table lists the enrolments accord- 
ing to types of instruction for the past five years: 

Fiscal Tjgg Correspondence Qftfj l&tli (foee) 

19^2-^3* 2 t 9**3 9,621 12.5& ( 3*<7) 

IcMJ+if 6 085 12,i+35 18,520 ( 1086) 

19MUf5 a*Mf7 15,820 2**,267 < 995) 

19*f5-if6 5,607 23,513 29,320 (10,388) 

19kb-b7 5,13^ 13,395 18,529 (10,625) 

♦Seven months only (December 1, 19**2 - June 30, 19^3) 

The distribution of "free" enrolments for the fis- 
cal year was as follows t 

World War II Veterans .Correspondence. 2 ,332 

Class 7,**00 

Total 9,732 

Disabled Veterans; blind 
students] inmates of cor- 
rectional institutions, 
hospitals and sanitoria Correspondence. .893 

7_ 893 

Total Correspondence 3,^25 

Total Class 7,**00 

Grand Total 10,625 

To provide for instruction, the Division expended 
$213,802.89, but it returned to the State treasury 
$►57,791.35, collected in charges for courses, materials, 
and services. Of the total receipts, $39,221.00 were 
from class enrolments, ^17,560.79 from correspondence 
enrolments, ^1^+0.83 from sales to institutions. &95.&5 
from class sales, and $773.08 from audio-visual aids in- 
struction services. 









2 (**6-**7) 

The following table lists the receipts from paid 
enrolments for the last five years: 

Receipts per 
Fjscaj, ycgr gft|fl ffprotoffit? IPffrtffffn^ff flyreffljs , feggJBCtt 

19^-^3* 12.217 $50,2*+5.82 $ 7.00** 

19ifW& 17*^32 126,955.71 10.00** 

I9MUV5 23,272 160,358.20 10.00** 

19^5-^6 18*93? 138,9*9.00 7.33 

X9H6-47 7,9<& 56,781.79 7.19 

♦Seven months only (December 1, 19^2-June 30,19^3) 
** Heceipts estimated at weighted average. 

The table below gives possible additional receipts 
had "free" enrolments been paid for at the rate of paid 
enrolments or weighted averages listed above s 

Heceipts j^ev Total Additional 

19**2-*3« 31*7 I 7 # 00 $ 2,597.00 

19^3-Mf 1,038 10.00 10*880.00 

19*W*5 995 10.OO 9,950.00 

19k5-hb 10,388 7.33 7©,l&*-.0*+ 

19^6-^7 10,625 7.19 76,393,75 

♦Seven months only (December 1, 19^2-June 30, 19^3) 

A listing of expenditures, receipts, enrolments, 
and net costs for the past five years follows! 

Fiscal Estimated Additional 
Expenditure? Receipts jflj Cost "free" Receipts 



19^2-^3* I 98.836.J*3 $ 53,3^2.06 $^5,^9^.37 $ 2,597.00 
19^3-M+ 169A33.99 130,955.27 38, 1 +78.72 10,680.00 
191^5 193,516.00 16^,520.25 28,995.75 9,950.00 
19MJ+6 215,670.1** 11+2,036.53 73,633.61 76,lw.0*f 
19M-A7 213,802.89 57,791.35 156,001.5** 76,393.75 

♦Seven months only (December 1, 19**2 - June 30, 19**3) 



3 0*(>J*7) 

jggiflEBtttMm te*TOUffl 

anile enrolments for class instruction foil over ten 
thousand In 19^-^7, correspondence enrolments allowed a 
decrease of only a rev hundred from the previous fiscal 
year. This decrease is accounted for almost entirely by 
the further dropping off in the number of Waited States 
Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) enrolaents from 706 in 19^5- 
kb to 123 in 19**6-**7. 

It was overspending of funds in the previous year, 
necessitating rigid economies in the current year, whleh 
accounts for the abnormal drop in class enrolments. But 
it is noteworthy that correspondence instruction appears to 
show itself at its relative strongest in time of calamity, 
as witness not only its record this year but all during 
the years of the war. 

Approximately two hundred courses were made available 
by correspondence instruction in 19^6^7 f including the 
especially revised courses for veterans preparing for their 
high school diplomas at the Regional Veterans Education 
Centers. All the study material for this unique program, 
started in 19^5 » 1* provided by the Division, Much in 
demand by veterans were the college preparatory subjects — 
English, history, mathematics, and science — which they 
desired for the make-up of high school credits or for re- 
fresher study before entering college or other educational 
institutions under the so-called "G. I" educational bill. 
Considerable interest was also evident in accounting, civil 
service preparation, electricity, radio, and mechanical en- 
gineering courses. 

<tU$$ attottttai 

During 19^6-^7 the Division conducted 2^1 University 
Extension classes, in 28 communities, for which there were 
13,395 enrolments. Of these 9*002 were for 166 classes 
given in Boston end Cambridge, and U-,393 for 8? classes in 
"out-of-town" communities. 

The most popular categories of Instruction according to 
enrolments were Civil Service Preparation (^,780) $ 
Business and Professional (2,550) t Trade and Industrial 
(1,90*0 j and Science and Mathematics (1,236). 






Class last-ruction (eont.) 

An important feature of the Division's class instruc- 
tion program has been the n toady furthering of professional 
improvement courses for teachers. They were given in Ih 
communities in 19^-^7, and plans are under way for a much 
greater advance in this category in the future. 

From its establishment in 1915, the Division has 
recognized that courses for teachers represent an educational 
investment that provides a two-fold return to the Commonwealth, 
(1) by raising the professional status of the teacher himself 
and (2) by adding to the intellectual growth of the teacher's 
pupils through the improved instruction the teacher is able 
to give them as a result of his professional studies. The 
Division is in a strategic position to receive requests from 
teacher groups for the particular instruction they need and 
to serve them by obtaining instructors specially qualified 
to give the desired instruction. Having no resident faculty 
of its own. the Division is free to select from the faculty 
of any college the instructor best qualified to teach a 
particular subject. Likewise in the planning of teacher 
courses, the Division is not restricted to the curriculum 
offering of any one college but may organize a course in 
any desired field and to meet any need. A prime concern of 
the Division has always been to provide teachers with the 
widest possible opportunity of taking professional im- 
provement courses by establishing classes in centers accessible 
to teachers living in wery part of the State, 



§9§ 



5 (ifc^?) 



Distribution of extension classes and enrolments 
by cities and towns: 



Cities & 

xouns 




Enrol- 
sents 


Cities & 


Classes 


Enrol- 
ments 


Athol 


X 


1 ■ 


Manchester 


1 


h 


Bridgewater 


Ih 


395 


Hiddleboro 


Z 


50 


Boston 


36 


1A5 


Hew Bedford 


h 


605 


Brockton 


2 




Sevton 


X 


73 


Cambridge 


130 


7257 


Northampton 


1 


31 


Ditftatfli 


X 


2** 


Pittsfield 


7 


392 


Everett 


1 


X5 


Quincy 


1 


20 


Fall Hiver 


1 


70 


Southbridge 


1 


12 


Fitchburg 


1 


69 


So, Hadley 


1 


39 


Framinghaai 


2 


& 


Springfield 


8 


575 


Greenfield 


5 


191 


Taunton 


1 


kb 


Holyoke 


e 


331 


Waltham 


% 


76 


Hyannis 


k 


hX 


Hestport 


1 


21 


Lavrence 


2 


291 


W K . Springfield 1 


75 


Lovell 


2 


160 
Totals 


, Worcester 


12 


III 




30 


251 


13,395 



92 



6 Qk>J*7) 

The following table gives the distribution of ex- 
tension classes according to categories} 



Type of ^sfon-Caffifcridf;e 
Courses Class- Enrol- 



Qut-of-Iovn Total £otal 
Class- Enrol- Classes Enrol- 



es 



jants 



Civil Ser- 17 
vice 

Reparation 2 f 16G 

Trade and 37 
Industrial 1,W> 

Business and^3 
Professional 2 , 550 

English and Ih 
Literature 577 

Foreign 5 
Languages 172 

Science and 28 
Mathematics 1,198 

History, Sociol- 2 
ogy, Economics 63 



ments 



'W 
*5 

22 

5 

3b 
11 
19 

7 
10 
11 

1 



aents 



i'eacher 

Training 



m*$m 



33 



128 



Psychology, Men- 6 
tal Development 395 



Cultural 
end Hobby 



262 



Health and 1 

Bntritlon 2h 

Totals 9,002 



8 



a 



2 

V 

17 

3 
h 






2,620 
>f6*f 



16? 



38 
232 

79 

162 
128 



**,393 



"25T 



k f 780 

1,90** 

2,550 

7tk 

172 

1,236 

295 

516 
207 
557 
390 

& 



13,395 



7 {hb^7) 

During 19**6-**7 programs for Adult Civic Education 
were conducted in fifty-seven communities in ffassaehusetts. 
The total riaiaber of adult persons reached in these 
programs was 6^,711* la comparison with the school year 
19 l *5~ i *fc, which showed a total of k9 f h^ persons served, 
there is an Increase of 15,237. The following cities 
and towns reopened programs of Adult Civic Education or 
offered such programs for ^.he first timej Brookline, 
Frsuaingham, Manchester, Mansfield, Montague, and Winchendon. 

For the teachers and supervisors training courses, 
regional meetings, and conferences were held in Boston, 
Greenfield, Hew Bedford, Plttsfield, Springfield, Swamps- 
cott, and Taunton* Four bulletins entitled? Insight and 
Foresight in Adult Education" and three conference 
summaries, "Adult Education in Action, n were issued during 
the year. 

Statistics of Adult Civic Education for July 1, 19M- 
June 30, 19^7. 

Adult Civic Education Classes . , 6295 

Expanded Courses 3712 

Counselling , 10682 

Community Activities • • . • 35*45® 

Forums, Panels, Symposiums 8566 

6** 711 
Sumber of Communities to hold classes..... 57 

Somber of teachers 337 

Amount of reimbursement $o* 9 ?2X»Vl 

tijMvHMiti«9»V*ffl«fl A,flft| ftraflryjl 

The fiscal year of 19*+6-**7 was mainly one of compre- 
hensive planning for the Office of Radio and Audio-Visual 
Aids services. But by the end of the year the Division 
has published 125,000 bulletins which were mailed to schools 
in order to bring to the attention of teachers the op- 
portunities that they and their students had to listen 
to the best in music, drama, and education then being 
offered by the broadcasters in this area. Advisory sub- 
committees on the secondary, elementary, and adult levels 
were established by the Hew England Committee on Kadlo in 
Education and the Office of Hadio and ten conferences or 
institutes for teachers were held under their sponsorship. 
The attendance at these meetings totaled over 1500 persons. 



194 



8 (kbJ+7) 

Since its inception in 19**6, the Division's Office 
of Badlo has been the recipient of several thousand 
transcriptions for the use of educational groups. In* 
eluded are the following series of programs 5 Open for 
Discussion) Junior Town Meeting of the Air$ Let's Go 
Exploring; Lest We Forget j 2$r Favorite Story $ Adventures 
In Science j Living Literature i Music in the Air 5 Seeing 
America} Neva in Beviewj American Adventurej Down to 
Earth f Sewing is Easyf Men of Action; It's up to Youth | 
Let Freedom Hingf and Your Life's Worfc. 

The use in schools of these educational recordings 
has been exceedingly limited because funds have not yet 
been made available to the Office of Radio for maintejt- 
nance of a loan library. 

State, m Scl>oo^ MUMikUm v'ffftitf tartO *T9fgfl» 

i>urin£ the fiscal year, 19 l *6« 3 +7 f it vas arranged that 
the payrolls of the Division's State Hi$bt School EqulvafL- 
l*ncy Certificate Program should be met by Services to War 
Veterans' Funds. According to this arrangement civilians, 
who had been interviewed, counselled and tested along 
with veterans by the same staff, were excluded in fact if 
not in principle. For while the law provides that 
civilians should benefit as well as veterans, no financial 
provision was made for them. Therefore this phase of the 
program — a minor one, to be sure, compared to the great 
preponderance of veteran applicants — which concerned 
civilians was virtually discontinued. 

On June 30, 19^7 * a total of **,957 applications for 
the State High School Equivalency Certificates had been 
received at the State office. Of this number 2,007 were 
filed during the fiscal year of 19^6-^7. <tf *k© total ap- 
plications on file, approximately 95 per cent were from 
veterans. About 75 per cent of these veterans are com- 
pleting their high school education in order to qualify 
for admission to colleges, technical schools, or other in- 
stitutions of higher learning! the remaining 25 per cent 
need high school certification for employment or advance- 
ment. 

In this, its second year, the program may be said to 
have gotten well under way. A total of 219 certificates 
was awarded to successful applicants by vote of the 
Policies' Committee of the Program. This brought the 
total of certificates awarded to date to 267. 



iUF 






■ 



** 



H 






H 



r&fZ& 



■ 



PART IT 143 

DEPARTMENT OF CORPORATIONS AND TAXATION (Sch. No. 12)— Concluded 

1204 APPELLATE TAX BOARD (Total, $128,803.30) 

1204-01 Personal Services 
Personal services §103 858 16 



1204-02 Expenses 
Clerks, stenographers, etc. (not on payroll) 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Books, maps, etc. .... 

Electricity ...... 

Express, freight, etc. .... 

Office furniture and files 

Outside laundry ..... 

Paper for printing .... 

Postage ...... 

Printing and binding .... 

Rental (office) ..... 
Repairs to office furniture and equipment 
Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Other 



S 315 85 

864 00 

25 30 

358 50 

73 80 

160 29 

415 26 

1 568 65 

11 800 02 

612 27 

469 38 

1 351 29 

1 404 94 
20 00 



1205 REIMBURSEMENT OF CITIES AND TOWNS 
(Total, $266,680.40) 

1205-01 Reimbursement of Cities and Towns for Loss of Taxes 
on Land Used for Public Purposes 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) ...... 



Total expenditures — From General Fund ..... 

— From Inter-Fund Transfer from Highway Fund 



$ 5 505 59 



19 439 55 



24 945 14 



266 680 40 

2 394 606 35 
62 750 00 

' 82 457 356 35 



i Includes 1947 Charges (unpaid), §5,706.26; 1946 Accounts Payable, paid in 1947, $9,354.88; unpaid, 
$37.20 (see Schedule 46). 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13) 
Department Code 1300 



RECEIPTS 
Administration: 

Sales (waste paper, scrap metal, etc., S121.25; specifications, 850) 
Licenses (trade schools) ........ 

Miscellaneous (damages to cars) ....... 

Division of University Extension: 

Fees (for sundry courses) . . . 

Sales (examination papers, films, etc.) ...... 

Division of Vocational Education: 

Fees (for courses in Arts of Design) ...... 

Reimbursement for services (from the Federal Government) for 
supervision in the agricultural division (received from Account 

4113-21) 

Sales (materials) ......... 

Miscellaneous (refunds from trainees) ...... 

Division of Schools: 

Reimbursement for services: 

Education of deaf and blind pupils (for board) 

Receipts applicable to schools and colleges (see tabulation following this 
schedule) : 
State teachers colleges ........ 

Massachusetts School of Art ....... 

Textile schools .......... 

University of Massachusetts (total, 8939,764.02) : 

Fees ............ 

Fines and penalties ......... 

Gifts, grants and contributions (A. A. A. program) .... 

Reimbursement for services: 

Tuition $365 710 79 

Board (regular and transient) 209 942 80 

Other 829 27 



S 171 25 

4 275 00 

95 60 


$ 4 541 85 


37 098 02 
1 009 56 


38 107 58 


5 861 00 

11 200 00 

81 00 

125 12 


17 267 12 



508 820 81 

40 622 67 

165 983 24 



123 789 23 

34 00 

271 40 



576 482 86 



8 774 53 



715 426 72 



144 



P.D. 140 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

RECEIPTS— Concluded 



University of Massachusetts: — Concluded 

Rents ........ 

Sales ......... 

Miscellaneous: 

Commission on telephone pay station receipts 

Key deposits ....... 

Breakage ....... 

Other 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy: 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) 
Support of School Ship (received from Account 4113-5 
Reimbursement for services: 

Federal Government — subsistence of midshipmen 
Meals served to officers ..... 



692,10 
429 40 
394 35 
680 56 



$132 143 91 
104 846 21 



2 196 41 



$939 764 02 



1) . 

34 957 50 
1 510 49 


25 000 00 
36 467 99 



Sales (food, etc.) 
Rents (houses) 



Miscellaneous: 

Forfeited deposits . . . 

Commission on telephone pay station receipts 
Balance in Mess Account 



130 18 
479 18 



555 54 
279 180 
545 19 



Division of the Blind: 

Licenses (to solicit funds) G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 69, ss. 25A; 25B . 
Reimbursement for services (for piano tuning and mattress renovation) 
Sales (manufactured articles from shops and salesroom) . 



1 380 53 


9 00 
23 824 51 
168 793 61 



63 457 88 



192 627 12 



Total receipts $1 979 906 82 



EXPENDITURES 

1301 ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER EXPENSES 
(Total, $3,608,141.98) 

Office Administration (Total, $235,198.63) 

1301-01 Commissioner s Salary 
Personal services ......... 



1301-02 Personal Services 
Personal services .... 



Travel 



1301-03 Travel 



$11 000 00 

158 678 84 

4 658 09 



1301-04 Expenses 
Office and administrative expenses : 
Blueprints, photostats, etc. . 
Books, maps, etc. .... 

Express, freight, etc. . . . • . 

Membership dues .... 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 

Office furniture and files 

Office machines (purchased) 

Paper for printing .... 

Postage ...... 

Printing and binding .... 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment 
Stationery and office supplies 

Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Gasoline and oil . 

Motor vehicle repairs and supplies . 

Other expenses ..... 

1301-10 Maintenance of Newbury Street Building 
Personal services 

Non-professional services (sundry) 
Building materials and supplies 
Cleaning and lavatory supplies, etc. 

Electricity, heat and water 
Furniture, furnishings, etc. 
Outside laundry 
Postage 

Removal of snow . 
Repairs (buildings) 
Telephone and telegrams 
Trees, shrubs, fertilizers, etc. 
Other expenses 



. $ 31 27 

394 65 
88 21 
60 00 


18 80 
139 66 
280 00 
398 62 


3 132 52 

. 2 271 55 

156 70 

. 3 123 62 


826 26 
31 65 





$10 953 51 

15S76 

373 52 

33 34 



8 473 38 

86 00 

97 97 

368 72 

5 687 57 
100 65 
306 24 
283 12 

26 63 

400 97 

3 594 81 

249 00 

29 74 



11 519 13 



19 704 80 



PART II 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1301 ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER EXPENSES— Continued 

Office Administration — Concluded 

1301-18 Surplus Property Board 

Personal services ....... 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. ..... 

Postage . . 

Stationery and office supplies ....... 

Telephone and telegrams ....... 

Travel 

Other expenses ......... 

1301-19 Children of Employed Mothers Program 

Personal services ......... 

Reimbursements (cities and towns) . ' . 

Travel 

1301-23 Educational Committee on Personal and Religious 
Liberties 

Personal services 
Books, maps, etc. . 
Express, freight, etc. 
Paper for printing . 

Postage 

Printing and binding 
Travel . 
Typewriters . 

1301-26 Preparing Courses of Study for Elementary Grades 

Personal services 
Express, freight, etc. 
Paper for printing . 
Printing and binding 
Travel . 



145 



$ 9 172 76 




40 00 




533 27 




91 14 




529 05 




242 52 




7 20 


$10 615 94 


3 562 35 




10 610 60 




93 45 


14 266 40 


1 068 50 




137 72 




600 




241 37 




41 23 




654 05 




28 00 




125 55 


2 302 42 


120 00 




96 81 




2 067 85 




60 02 




108 33 


2 453 01 



Aid to Certain Schools, Pupils, etc. (Total, $22,177.86) 

1301-06 School Registers and Blanks 

Express, freight, etc. 

Paper for printing . 

Postage 

Printing and binding 

Stationery and office supplies 

1301-07 Teachers Institutes 

Professional services (lecturers) ....... 

Cleiks, stenographers, etc. ........ 

Travel 

1301-08 Aid to Pupils in State Teachers Colleges 
Aid to students (teachers colleges) ....... 

1301-09 Higher Education — Children of World War Veterans 
Aid to students (sundry educational institutions) .... 



48 45 

385 51 

140 00 

4 070 10 

24 59 


4 668 65 


925 00 

14 00 

105 85 


1 044 85 




5 000 00 
11 464 36 



Division of Vocational Education — (Total, $578,642.72) 

1301-30 Aid to Certain Persons 
Aid to students (tuition, etc.) ....... 



1301-31 Teachers for Vocational Schools 
Personal services ...... 

Professional services (instructors, lecturers, etc!) 
Non-professional services (sundry) . . . 

Clerks, stenographers, etc. (not on payroll) 

Office and administrative expenses: 
Books, maps, etc. 
Express, freight, etc. 
Paper for printing 
Postage .... 

Photographs, photostats, etc. 
Printing and binding . 
Repairs to office machines 
Stationery and office supplies 

Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 



$ 184 27 

54 45 

7155 

482 32 


26 50 
505 60 

51 51 
466 78 


490 67 
3 136 66 



57 654 94 

6 567 50 

114 90 

119 83 



8 853 65 



5 470 31 



146 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 

1301 ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER EXPENSES— Continued 
Division of Vocational Education — Concluded 

1301-31 Teachers for Vocational Schools — Concluded 
Educational and instructional supplies and equipment 
Gasoline and oil . . . . . 

Motor vehicle repairs and supplies ... 
Reimbursement ''State Teachers College, Framingham) 
Other expenses ....... 

Less amount paid from inter-fund transfer receipt from Federal Grant 
(Account 4113-21) 

1301-32 Vocational Rehabilitation 
Personal services .......... 

Medical and hospital care ........ 

Medical supplies and equipment . . .... 

School books and instructional supplies and equipment 

Travel 

Tuition ........ 



P.D. 140 

13) — Continued 



1301-41 Education of Deaf and Blind Pupils 
Tuition, beard and travel (sundry schools) 
Reimbursements (cities and towns — day schools for the deaf) 



407 05 

78 14 

60 12 

2 460 00 

17 00 



72 949379 
36 045 03 


$36 904 76 


1 340 01 
7 386 14 
4 695 07 
3 141 07 

2 000 98 
41 475 61 


60 038 88 


418 613 34 
18 187 06 


436 800 40 



Reimbubsements and Aid (Total, 82,550,334.68) 

1301-51 School Superintendents in Small Towns 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) . 

1301-52 High School Tuition 
Reimbursements : 

Cities and towns ....... 

Other 



1301-53 High School Transportation 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) . 



1301-54 Vocational Education 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) . 



1301-55 English Speaking Classes for Adults 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) .... 



194 915 44 
114 80 



91 936 69 

195 030 24 

197 661 96 

2 000 275 80 

65 429 99 



Division of Univebsity Extension (Total, $221,788.09) 

1301-61 Personal Services 

Personal services .......... 

Professional services: 

Instructors and lecturers ...... $62 932 17 

Other 591 85 

Non-professional services (sundry) 
Clerks, stenographers, etc. (not on payroll) 

1302-G2 Expenses 
Non-professional services (sundry) . 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Blueprints, etc. ..... 

Books, etc. . . . . . 

Express, freight, etc. .... 

Membership dues .... 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 

Office furniture and files 

Office machines (purchased) 

Paper for printing .... 

Postage ...... 

Printing and binding .... 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment 

Stationery and office supplies 

Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 



Electrical work, etc. .... 

Rental (rooms, etc.) .... 

School books, instructional supplies and equipment 
Other expenses ...... 



89 82 

85 55 

345 30 

59 00 

472 40 

179 28 

1 497 70 

324 21 

3 .867 51 

3 237 73 
345 71 

5 273 16 
491 42 

4 180 22 



118 118 46 




63 524 02 




2 768 17 
199 00 


184 609 65 



77 00 



1301-64 English Speaking Classes for Adults- 
Personal services ....... 



-Personal Services 



20 449 01 

138 15 

1 839 39 

6 603 84 

86 45 


29 193 84 




6 297 38 



PART 11 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1301 ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER EXPENSES— Concluded 
Division of Univrsity Extension — Concluded 



147 



1301-65 English Speaking Classes for Adults — Expenses 

Books, maps, etc. .... 
Express, freight, etc. 
Membership dues .... 
Mimeographing, etc. 

Postage . . 

Printing and binding 

School books and instructional supplies 

Stationery and oflice supplies . 

Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Other expenses .... 



1302 DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

(Total, $57,135.81) 

1302-01 Personal Services 
Personal services ........... 



8 



1302-02 Expenses 
Professional services (sundry) . 
Non-professional services (janitors, cleaners, etc.) 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Books, maps, etc. .... 

Commissions, fees, etc. 

Electricity ..... 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 

Office furniture ..... 
Outside laundry ..... 
Paper for printing .... 

Postage ...... 

Printing and binding .... 
Rentals (total, $5,056.45): 

Offices . . . . 

Office furniture and equipment . 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment 
Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Other 



1303 DIVISION OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Total, $53,193.43) 

1303-01 Personal Services 
Personal services .......... 



S 70 70 

25 00 

629 06 

175 65 


10 50 

36 85 

48 16 

730 89 


118 11 


4 982 20 
74 25 


35 46 

552 62 

1 381 88 

195 65 

15 67 



1303-02 Expenses 

Personal services .... 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Books, maps, etc. 

Express, freight, etc. 

Membership dues 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 



Office furniture and furnishings 
Office machines (purchased) 
Postage .... 
Stationery and office supplies 

Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 
Repairs to office machines 
Printing and binding . 

Gasoline and oil . 

Motor vehicle repairs and supplies 

Rental (garages) 

Shipping supplies . 

Other expenses 



1303-03 Books and Other Publications 
Books, maps, etc. (for loans to libraries) . 
Binding, etc. ...... 



14 80 
323 25 

3100 
152 79 

213 16 
022 18 
075 60 
092 70 



123 52 

2 044 61 

16 53 

191 92 



20 98 

45 01 
13 00 
17 25 

49 90 
681 18 

21 86 
33 56 

46 74 
751 80 

5 94 



$ 1 687 22 



47 881 66 



15 50 
156 00 



9 082 65 



9 254 15 



39 197 32 



490 22 



6 302 06 

413 60 
559 69 

72 00 
135 43 

23 77 



5 909 42 
89 92 



7 996 77 



5 999 34 



148 



P.D.140 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1304 DIVISION OF THE BLIND (Total, $851,233.03) 



1304-01 General Administration 
Personal services ..... 
Professional services: 

Consultants ..... 

Guides ...... 

Other 



Office and administrative expenses: 
Blueprints, photographs, etc. 
Books, maps, etc. 
Electricity 
Express, freight, etc. 

Membership dues 
Office furniture . 
Outside laundry . 
Postage 

Printing and binding 

Rental (office) 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment 

Stationery and office supplies 

Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 

Typewriters 



Motor vehicles — purchase and maintenance: 
Automobile (purchased) 
Gasoline and oil . 

Rental (garages) .... 

Repairs and supplies .... 



Other expenses 



300 00 
863 50 
512 60 



30 50 

50 40 

262 53 

214 77 

19 00 
652 04 

47 95 
825 02 

79 70 

3 983 26 

25 47 

27168 

994 20 

3 729 69 

213 52 



529 07 
220 57 
190 00 
113 59 



1304-06 Instruction of Adult Blind at Home 
Personal services 
Materials for workers 
Postage 
Repairs to office machines 

Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 
Other expenses 

1304-08 Aid to Blind 
Funeral expenses ... 
Medical services (examinations and reports) 
Medical supplies (glasses, etc.) ...... 

Subsidies (.to blind persons) ...... 

1304-10 Piano Tuning and Mattress Renovating 
Services (piano tuning) ....... 

Reimbursements (mattress renovation) .... 

1304-11 Local Shops — Operation 
Personal services 

Non-professional services (sundry) 
Building materials and supplies 
Cleaning and lavatory supplies, etc. 

Express, freight, etc. 
Fuel, electricity, etc. 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Machinery for manufacturing . 

Postage .... 

Printing and binding 
Rentals: 

Shops .... 

Storage space 

Other .... 

Repairs (sundry) 
Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 
Other expenses 

1304-12 Local Shops — M erchandise and Payments to 
Blind Employees 
Non-professional services: 

Guides ' . . . 2 163 43 

Other 38 464 28 



. 4 


266 55 
120 00 
157 75 







847 359 80 



1 676 10 



Materials for manufacturing . 



11 399 73 



1 053 23 
155 49 



21 446 60 

331 69 

47 32 

18 00 

20 61 

176 82 

4 287 59 

35 



2 773 00 

1 160 81 

68 00 

367 550 13 



9 989 21 
13 954 85 



11 042 29 

4 386 07 

90 49 

62 42 

1 802 92 
757 26 
147 40 
154 35 

99 98 
125 39 



4 544 30 

68 29 

99 78 

510 11 

263 82 

50 37 



40 627 71 
20 962 22 



$61 644 35 



26 328 98 



371 551 94 



23 944 06 



24 205 24 



61 589 93 



PART II 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1304 DIVISION OF THE BLIND— Continued 



149 



$ 619 89 
3 064 96 



1304-13 Woolaon House — Operation 

Personal services ..... 
Non-professional services: 

Janitors and cleaners 

Other 

Commissions, fees, etc. 
Express, freight, etc. 
Fuel, electricity and water 
Machinery for manufacturing 

Postage 

Printing and binding 
Rental (buildings) . 
Repairs (sundry) 

Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 
Other expenses 

1304-14 Woolson House — Merchandise and Payments 
to Blind Employees 

Non-professional services: 

Guides . . . 442 85 

Other 

Materials for manufactur 
Shipping supplies . 
Travel . 



ng 



1304-15 Salesroom Operation 
Personal services .... 
Non-professional services: 

Janitors and cleaners . 

Other 

Blind consignors 
Electricity and water 
Express, freight, etc. 
Materials for manufacturing 

Postage 

Printing and binding 
Rental (salesroom) 
Repairs (sundry 

Shipping supplies . 
Telephone and telegrams 
Travel .... 
Other expenses 



1304-16 Cambridge Industries Operation 

Personal services . . 

Non-professional services (sundry) 
Building materials and supplies 
Electricity .... 

Express, freight, etc. 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Machinery for manufacturing . 
Office furniture 

Postage .... 

Printing and binding 
Rental (shops) 
Repairs (sundry) 

Stationery and office supplies . 
Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Other expenses 

1304-17 Cambridge Industries- 
to Blind Employees 

Non-professional services: 

Guides ..... 
Other . : . . . 

Materials for manufacturing 
Shipping supplies .... 
Subsidies ..... 



S 3 500 00 



3 684 85 

164 96 

1 147 64 

656 20 

49 55 

37 27 

34 29 

600 00 

60 95 

31 17 

224 46 

55 05 

20 96 



$10 267 35 



. 20 370 03 


20 812 88 

13 653 75 

59 89 

303 30 




■ 


34 829 82 




3 730 25 




153 22 
1229 83 


1 383 05 

9 669 85 
169 68 
236 37 

5 275 67 










232 65 

41 01 

3 000 00 

38 55 






98 80 

128 88 
52 70 
3140 


24 088 86 




14 581 25 

59 56 

87 15 

229 70 






3 054 75 

209 76 

216 24 

42 79 






112 78 

77 01 

6 399 96 

80 41 






17 81 
228 90 
545 29 

54 38 


25 997 74 


Payments 






2 418 00 
19 808 00 


22 226 00 

101 880 41 

106 26 

44 119 51 






168 332 18 



150 



P.D. 140 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1304 DIVISION OF THE BLIND— Concluded 



1304-27 Reimbursement for Sight-Saving Classes 
for Children 
Books, etc. ......... 

Reimbursements (cities and towns) .... 

Other expenses ........ 



1305 TEACHERS RETIREMENT BOARD 
(Total, $3,410,977.43) 

1305-01 Personal Services 
Personal services ...... 



1305-02 Expenses 
Professional services (physicians) 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Mimeographing, multigraphiftg, etc. 

Office furniture and files 

Office machines (purchased) 

Outside laundry ..... 

Paper for printing .... 

Postage ...... 

Printing and binding .... 

Premium on bonds .... 

Rental (office) ..... 
Repairs to office furniture and equipment 
Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 

Travel 

Other 

1305-04 Reimbursement for Pensions 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) 



. $ 151 85 

481 73 

. 1 933 68 

45 34 


138 23 

. 2 704 83 

1 249 99 

25 00 


. 2 405 00 

67 40 

674 69 

267 91 


278 95 
37 18 



1305-06 Retirement Assessments — Military and .Naval Service 
Commonwealth's share of assessments (under Acts of 15)41, c. 708, 
s. 9)— Paid to Account 5300 



1305-08 Retirement System — State's Share 
Pensions and retirement allowances .... 
Annuity reserve deficit and surplus interest adjustment: 

Paid to Account 5200 . .... 

Paid to Account 5300 

1306 MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY 

(Total, $245,166.23) 

Administeation 

1306-01 Personal Services 
Personal services ........ 



319 608 98 
1 471 24 



1306-02 Expenses of Commission 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Advertising ..... 

Blueprints, etc. . . 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 
Postage ...... 



Premium on bonds ..... 

Printing and binding .. 

Rentals: 

Office . . . . 

Office furniture and equipment . 

Stationery, books, office supplies and equipment 
Telephone and telegrams .... 

Travel 

Other 



916 00 
48 00 



Expenses of School Ship 

1306-10 Operation and Maintenance 
Personal services ........ 

Non-professional services (temporary labor and emergency) 
Books, maps, etc. . . . 

Building materials and supplies: 

Paints, oils, glass, etc. ....... 

Other 

Cleaning and lavatory supplies, etc. ..... 

Clothing, etc. . ...... 

Educational supplies ....... 

Express, freight, etc. ....... 



1 306 30 
1 214 86 



$ 192 90 

18 250 00 

9 68 $ 18 452 58 



385 00 



81 80 

34 60 

33 34 

196 30 

10 00 
160 04 



964 00 

176 15 

540 36 

345 85 

43 19 



92 726 62 
325 22 

278 19 



2 521 16 

1 268 26 
180 00 

91 36 

2 288 22 



37 083 62 



10 461 78 10 846 78 
452 867 36 



3 697 54 
2 585 401 91 
321 080 22 2 906 482 13 



8 034 76 






2 585 63 



PART II 



151 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1306 MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY— Concluded 

Expenses of School Ship — Concluded 

1306-10 Operation and Maintenance — Concluded 
Food and provisions .... 

Furniture, furnishings and household supp 
Heat and other plant operation: 

Fuel oil, coal, etc. 

Gas, electricity and water 

Other 



Medical supplies and equipment 

Motor vehicle repairs and supplies 

Navigation and nautical supplies 

Office machines and equipment (purchased) 

Outside laundry- 
Postage .... 
Printing and binding 
Premium on bonds 

Radio supplies and equipment 
Repairs (buildings, etc.) . 
Roadwork and materials 
Stationery, office supplies, etc. 

Telephone and telegrams 
Tools, implements, etc. . 

Travel 

Other expenses 

Cruise expenses on "American Mariner": 

Paid to Treasurer of United States, War Shipping Administration: 
Deck department (pilotage, wharfage, tugs, garbage removal, etc.) 
Engine department (fuel, water, oil, etc.) ..... 

Professional services ......... 

Food and provisions ......... 



$ 6 328 52 

5 699 18 
952 99 



Fuel oil 

Funeral expenses 
Gas, electricity, etc. 
Insurance . 



Lubricating oil . . . . • •»■ 

Navigation and nautical supplies ...... 

Repairs .......... 

Travel 

Other expenses ......... 

1306-24 Armory , Laboratory Building and Power Plant 
Professional services (architects and engineers) .... 
Plumbing and supplies ........ 

1306-25 Purchase of Water Front Land 
Professional services (appraisers, title examiners, etc.) 

1307) 
to ESTATE TEACHERS COLLEGES (Total, $1,446,811.27) 

1315 



$ 43 201 64 

1 466 90 


12 980 69 


252 55 
574 42 
621 59 
417 79 


948 69 

169 98 

150 84 

65 00 


121 00 
1 540 10 
1 600 00 

360 76 


1 257 55 
342 98 

1 983 17 
207 18 


3 436 77 

8 270 56 

14 251 79 

6 801 28 


11 128 20 

780 57 

1 127 97 

4 179 07 


436 18 
1 166 51 
1 061 59 

921 73 

940 78 S 222 444 86 


12 024 10 

16 88 12 040 98 



Operation and maintenance 

Boarding halls 

Specials 



see tabulation following this schedule 



60 00 



1 186 947 32 

235 266 16 

24 597 79 



1321 MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL OF ART (Total, $124,100.71) 

Operation and maintenance (see tabulation following this schedule) 
1331 



to ^TEXTILE SCHOOLS (Total, $494,712.49) 
1333] 

Operation and maintenance) see tabulation following this schedule 
Specials J ...... 



124 100 71 



468 305 45 
26 407 04 



1341 UND7ERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS (Total, $2,525,563.79) 

1341-00 

1341-82 . 

1341-83 [Operation and Maintenance 

1341-921 

1341-93J 
Administration : 

Personal services ...... 93 527 69 

Travel 4 814 91 

Trustees travel 490 11 

Printing reports ....... 3 006 43 

Supplies and equipment 10 127 42 111966 56 



152 P.D. 140 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1341 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS— Continued 



Instruction: 

Personal services ...... 

Supplies and equipment ... 

Short courses: 

Personal services ...... 

Travel 

Supplies and equipment ..... 

Extension courses: 

Personal services ...... 

Travel 

Supplies and equipment ..... 

Experiment station: 

Personal services ...... 

Travel 

Supplies and equipment ..... 

Waltham field station: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Fertilizer control law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses . . . . . 

Poultry disease law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Poultry bronchitis law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Dairy glassware testing law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Commercial feedstuff's law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Seed control law: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Dairy cattle certification: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Mastitis testing laboratory: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Productive enterprises: 

Personal services ...... 

Other expenses ....... 

Operation of plant: 

Personal services ...... 

Heat and other plant operation .... 

Ordinary maintenance ..... 

Repairs and renewals ...... 

Sub-total — General Maintenance (1341-00-01 to 
1341-00-74) 

Aid to certain students ...... 

Dutch elm disease . . 

Annual lease of dormitories ..... 

Sewage service ....... 



$504 525 83 
61 925 99 



86 281 16 
1 527 90 
7 320 16 



123 394 04 
15 497 60 
14 708 13 



180 932 82 

2 154 08 

28 767 72 



12 721 62 
8 549 88 


11 810 23 
2 720 01 


60 674 95 
27 115 83 


3 635 60 
3 011 17 


817 00 
200 00 


13 105 00 
2 238 29 


8 675 00 
2 106 53 


12 126 53 
1 652 08 


8 000 00 
6 661 95 


85 654 42 
66 036 16 



224 267 66 

113 025 92 

46 358 03 

117 152 64 



Boahding Hall (Total, $213,640.06) 

1341-77 Personal Services 
Personal services ..... 

1341-78 Expenses 

Food . . . .... 

Household supplies and furnishings . 
Office and administrative expenses . 
Repairs (sundry) ..... 

Other expenses ..... 



$566 451 82 



95 129 22 



153 599 77 



211 854 62 



21 271 50 



14 530 24 



87 790 78 



6 646 77 



1 017 00 



15 343 29 



10 781 53 



13 778 61 



14 661 95 



151 690 58 



500 804 25 



1 977 318 49 

4 999 71 

8 879 12 

61 250 00 

2 000 00 






118 902 07 
12 687 85 

1 588 32 

2 088 80 

50 99 



$2 054 447 32 



78 322 03 



135 318 03 



PART II 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (Schedule No. 13)— Continued 

1341 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS— Concluded 

Specials (Total, $257,476.41) 



153 



1341-07 Summer Sessio7i 
Personal services 

Food 

Household supplies and expenses 
Office and administrative expenses 
Other expenses 

1341-85 Power Plant Improvements (1946) 
Advertising ........ 

Blueprints, etc. ....... 

Contracts: 

Steam and electrical distributing system 

Steam line extension ...... 



$81 256 44 
53 293 30 



Less amount paid from inter-fund transfer receipt from Capital Out- 
lay Loan (Account 8428-01) 

1341-86 Home Economics Building 
Professional services (architects and engineers) .... 

Advertising ........... 

Blueprints, etc. .......... 

Contract (construction of classroom building) ..... 

Less amount payable from inter-fund transfer receipt from Capital 
Outlay Loan (Account 8428-01) 

1341-87 Housing Units 
Personal services ...... 

Advertising . . . 

Building materials and supplies 
Contract (building streets, utility services, etc.) 



Express, freight, etc. ..... 

Furniture, furnishings and household equipment 
Stationery, office supplies and equipment . 
Tools, implements, etc. ..... 



1341-88 Repairs to Poultry Plants 
Building materials and supplies 
Contract (constructing poultry house) 
Poultry plant equipment: 

Nests, etc. ..... 

Carriers, etc. ..... 

Tools, implements, etc. .... 



471 12 
305 90 



Total expenditures — From General Fund 

From Inter-Fund Transfer Receipts: 
Capital Outlay Loan 
Federal Grants 



$13 255 76 

273 17 

434 55 

706 27 

27 67 



65 09 
57 59 



134 549 74 
134 672 42 



$14 697 42 



43 662 32 


91 010 10 


1 731 07 

38 98 

32 05 

50 726 00 




52 528 10 
250 000 00 


i 197 471 90 


545 00 

22 95 
618 29 

28 874 41 

110 73 

4 940 78 

23 08 
677 40 


35 812 64 


230 73 

18 702 96 

777 02 
55 12 


19 765 83 



12 487 328 82 

293 662 32 
36 045 03 

» $12 817 036 17 



i Credit. 

2 Includes 1947 charges, unpaid, 8113,428.53; 1946 Accounts Payable, paid in 1947, $80,991.36, unpaid, 
86,435.58 Csee Schedule 46). For further expenditures of this Department, see Schedule 36, Veterans 
Services (Account 3513) 81,971,058.96; Schedule 43, Federal Grants (Accounts 4106-14, 4113-01, 
02, 21, 29, 32), $943,923.69. 



154 



P.D. 140 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Educational Institutions — 














State Teachers 




BrUgewater 


Ftichburo 


Framlngham 


Hyannis 1 


Lowell 


RECEIPTS 












Reimbursement for services: 














. $33 072 50 


$30 813 19 


$33 642 50 


$4 096 30 


$12 927 50 


Board (regular and transient) .... 


98 672 10 


54 833 69 


91 793 56 


- 


- 






[436 622 


f 18 033 








67 00 


{971 813 
{ 29 50 


68 75 
12 460 00' 


— 


24 00 




6 123 528 


49 93197 6 


- 


- 


- 


Special assessments . . . . . 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 




740 00 


- 


— 


1 205 00 


— 




662 25 


99 71 


73 51 


- 


- 




. 


7171 


198 57 


- 


- 


Total receipts (Colleges, $508,820.81; Art School, 












$40,622.'67; Textile, $165,983.24) . 


. $139 337 37 


$137 188 20 


$128 254 92 


$5 301 30 


$12 951 50 



EXPENDITURES 
Operation and Maintenance 
Personal services . 
Travel, office and other expenses 
Supplies — teaching 
Furnishings and household supplies 

Heat and other plant operation 
Garage and grounds 
Repairs, ordinary . 
Repairs and renewals 

Total operation and maintenance (Colleges, $1,186,947.32 
Art School, $124,100.71; Textile, $468,305.45) . 

Boarding Halls 

Personal services 

Food 

Supplies and other expenses 

Total, boarding halls (Colleges, $235,266.16) 

Specials 
Remodeling kitchen in Palmer Hall 
Utility services for housing 
College building, repairs 
Training building, repairs 

College building, painting 
Ceiling and wall, repairs 
Repairs and painting 
Machinery and equipment 

Interior painting and repairs 
Roof repairs 
Boiler repairs 



$168 491 42 $190 647 31 $160 493 83 $3 954 70 $84 463 46 

3 522 03 3 868 25 4 414 46 329 61 2 019 51 

5 090 68 11115 46 5 282 68 56 04 2 69189 

831 16 1 833 23 1 015 14 42 39 1 199 50 



23 112 06 


21 048 57 


15 178 27 


202 19 


2 256 08 


1 237 29 


653 07 


215 97 


- 


102 16 


1 836 80 


2 027 67 


2 708 95 


110 90 


1 064 95 


4 604 66 


15 215 67 


13 657 15 


- 


5 701 00 



Total, specials(Colleges, $24,597.79; Textile, $26,407.04) 
Total expenditures 



208 726 10 246 409 23 202 966 45 



4 695 83 99 498 55 



41 196 73 

42 998 98 
8 125 75 


19 993 21 

33 145 74 

6 463 66 


32 716 01 

35.922 60 

7 387 15 


2 01150' 


- 


92 321 46 


59 602 61 

656 60 
1 362 96 


76 025 76 


2 011 50 


- 



2 019 56 



$301 047 56 $308 031 40 $278 992 21 $6 707 33 $99 498 55 



1 Summer school session. 
J Veterans' housing (materials and labor) 
8 Handling charge — Veterans Administration. 
* From Smith Hughes Fund (Federal Grant) 



PART II 
(Schedule No. 13)— Concluded 
Receipts and Expenditures 



155 



Colleges 








Mass. 

School of 

Art 


Textile Schools 


North Adams 


Salem 


Westfleld 


Worcester 




Bradford 
Durfee 


Lowell 


New Bedford 


$11 246 16 
2 964 27 
/ 62 25 3 
\24 50 


$25 040 00 
45 50 


$8 450 00 

4 842 00 

28 00 


$14 983 13 
60 50 


$40 485 12 
29 00 


$3 860 64 
88 50 


$96 589 27 

/ 213 94 
\8 445 88 > 


$13 244 68 

« 388 26 


- 


6 897 15 « 


9 389 44 » 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


500 00 
26 05 

7 15 


17 65 
24 19 


1 137 05 
24 93 


17 60 


30 00 

100 

77 55 


10 000 00 

25 00 

3 376 73 

16101 


10 000 00 

765 03 
39 04 


10 000 00 

8 701 75 
83 51 


$14 830 38 


$32 024 49 


$23 871 42 


$15 061 23 


$40 622 67 


$17 511 88 


$116 053 16 


$32 418 20 


$69 287 74 

1 681 48 

1 518 56 

225 33 


$132 777 73 
1 902 13 
5 305 01 
1 366 22 


$67 910 57 

1 632 92 

2 662 15 

417 79 


$94 730 36 

1 956 35 

1 626 09 

50187 


$99 849 45 

1 705 63 

2 131 72 
1 030 96 


$69 594 27 

1 926 81 

8 716 67 

476 93 


$226 584 79 

7 127 44 

10 364 42 

1 565 22 


$77 675 40 

2 061 95 

8 358 83 

300 91 


5 418 78 
236 34 
989 70 

2 842 89 


6 581 86 
203 52 

1 078 84 

2 662 71 


6 929 02 

51138 

2 948 11 


4 427 46 
524 98 
917 42 

2 875 85 


11 726 44 

132 58 

2 093 19 

5 430 74 


3 797 55 

1 423 38 
11 499 70 


22 455 28 

374 01 

6 344 13 


4 492 60 

1 454 14 
1 711 02 


82 200 82 


151 878 02 


83 Oil 94 


107 560 38 


124 100 71 


97 435 31 


274 815 29 


96 054 85 


2 215 24 


- 


1 804 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


765 02 


- 


519 82 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



2 980 26 



2 324 57 



7 480 50 
7 912 30 

4 997 53 
2 187 90 



- 


~" 


— 


- 


- 


3 421 00 


9 887 74 
5 000 00 


14 32 
4 307 79 

3 001 99 
774 20 


- 


22 578 23 


- 


- 


- 


3 421 00 


14 887 74 


8 098 30 


$85 181 08 


$174 456 25 


$85 336 51 


$107 560 38 


$124 100 71 


$100 856 31 


$289 703 03 


$104 153 15 



5 From manufacturing concerns (for research). 

6 For training schools. 

7 Additional expenses of pupils transferred to other 

schools (board, transportation, etc.) 



156 P.D. 140 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL SERVICE AND REGISTRATION (Schedule No. 14) 

Department Code 1400 



RECEIPTS 
Division of Civil Service: 

Miscellaneous (witness and summons fees) 

Division of Registration : 
Fines and penalties: 

Violation of electricians laws CG. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 141, s. 5) 

Fees: 

For examinations, certificates and renewals: 

Board of Registration of Barbers (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, s. 87-0, as amended) 
Board of Registration of Certified Public Ac- 
countants (G. L. Ter. Ed.) c. 112, s. 87B) 



Board of Registration of Architects (G. L. Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, ss. 60B, 60C) 
Board of Dental Examiners (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) 

c. 112, ss. 45 and 48 as amended) 

State Examiners of Electricians (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) 
c. 141, s. 3, as amended) 

Board of Registration in Embalming and 
Funeral Directing (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 112, 
s. 83, as amended) .... 

Board of Registration of Professional Engineers 
and Land Surveyors (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) 
c. 112, ss. 81K-81Q) .... 

Board of Registration of Hairdressers (G. L. 
(Ter. Ed.) c. 112, ss. 87T-JJ) . 

Board of Registration in Medicine (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, s. 2, as amended; s. 2A) / 

Board of Registration in Chiropody (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, s. 16, as amended) 

Board of Registration of Nurses (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112,s. 74) 

Board of Registration in Optometry (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, ss. 68 and 69, as amended) . 

Board of Registration in Pharmacy (G. L. (Ter. 

Ed.) c. 112, ss. 24 and 39) 
State Examiners of Plumbers (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) 

c. 142, s. 5; s. 6, as amended) . 

Board of Registration in Veterinary Medicine 
(G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 112, s. 55, as amended) 



S30 209 50 
6 190 00 

6 320 00 
10 975 75 



55 556 00 
9 669 00 



60 745 95 
68 123 55 

23 296 95 

1 677 00 

48 563 32 

2 944 00 

38 717 00 
33 153 00 

1 990 00 



Total receipts ../..... 

EXPENDITURES 

1402 DIVISION OF CIVIL SERVICE (Total, $357,935.06) 

1402-01 Commissioner and Associates 
Personal services ../....... 



1402-02 Personal Services 
Personal services .... 



1402-03 Expenses 
Professional services (examiners, etc.) 
Clerks, stenographers, etc. (not on payroll 
Office and administrative expenses: 

Advertising .... 

Books, maps, etc. 

Express, freight, etc. . 

Office furniture and files 

Paper for printing 

Postage ..... 

Printing and binding . 

Rental (rooms for examinations) . 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment 
Stationery, office and examination supplies and 

equipment ..... 
Telephone and telegrams 
Typewriters ..... 
Travel 

1402-21 Hearings on Removals 
Professional services Clegal, etc.) 



537 12 

353 92 

85 52 

2 825 86 

2 071 83 
9 569 32 
7 370 25 
1 465 93 

353 82 



$ 4 00 
$ 190 00 






398 131[02 398 321 02 



$398 325 02 



$18 000 00 
281 920133 



$15 185 50 
2 302 94 



7 179 81 
556 92 
362 75 

6 608 24 


39 341J29 


56 829 73 




1 185 00 



''' 



PART II 



215 



VETERANS SERVICES FUND (Schedule No. 36)— Continued 



Depabtment of Education Activities 



3513-22 Regional Educational Centers 
Personal services ...... 

Professional services: 

Instructors and lecturers 

Other 

Non-professional services (sundry) . 
Clerks, stenographers, etc. (not on payroll) 



Books, maps, etc. . 

Express, freight, etc. 

Filing equipment 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 

Paper for printing . 
Postage .... 

Printing and binding 
Rental (office machines) 

Repairs to office machines 
Stationery and office supplies . 
Telephone and telegrams 
Travel 



356 968 50 
33 688 75 



3513-23 University of Massachusetts — Fort Devens Branch 
Personal services: 
Administration . 
Instruction 
Maintenance 

Travel, office expenses, etc. 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Medical and general care 
Heat and other plant operation 

Garage and grounds 

Repairs, ordinary . 

Repairs and renewals 

Teachers supplies and equipment, college 

Student supplies — reimbursable 

Rental and insurance 

Summer session .... 

Total expenditures — Department of Education, 81,971,058.96 



117 158 37 


390 657 25 


236 25 
8 176 75 


39 31 

123 96 

130 26 

1 178 68 


823 79 

1 570 71 

378 34 

85 68 


78 22 
814 16 
764 24 
9 587 51 531 803 48 


50 906 35 
372 858 36 
246 059 61 


23 604 24 

15 390 48 

4 892 20 

122 443 16 


8 917 17 

15 872 79 

258 999 57 

123 594 56 


91 199 55 
64 230 55 
40 286 89 1 439 255 48 



PART II 



FEDERAL GRANTS (Schedule No. 43) 
Code 4100 



»i?"5#1 



223 



Governor and Council Activities 



SOLDIERS' HOME IN MASSACHUSETTS, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 

Gifts, grants and contributions: 

Contributions from the United States: 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 10, s. 7) 

EXPENDITURES 
(4104) 

Inter-fund transfer to General Fund — Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts (Account 0430)- 
for maintenance ........... 

Total expenditures — Governor and Council, $109,264.10 









Department op Conservation Activities 
FEDERAL FORESTRY, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 



Gifts, grants and contributions: 

Contributions from the United States (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 10, s. 8A): 
Prevention of forest fires ........ 

Development of state forests — nursery work .... 

Balance, July 1, 1946 



$ 62 606 49 
3 678 00 



EXPENDITURES 
(4110) 
4110-12 Prevention of Forest Fires 
Personal services .... 

Professional services (appraisers, etc.) 
Non-professional services: 

Laborers with teams . . . . . . $ 261 56 

Other 11 030 89 



Books, maps, etc. .... 
Building materials and supplies 
Electricity ..... 
Educational supplies 

Express, freight, etc. 
Fire fighting equipment and supplies 
Guns, ammunition, etc. . 
Household supplies 

Land (purchased) .... 

Medical and laboratoy supplies 

Motor vehicles — purchase and maintenance: 

Passenger automobiles (purchased) ... 6 261 32 

Gasoline and oil 4 890 86 

Rental (garages) 1 017 00 

Repairs and supplies ...... 6 287 99 

Observation towers 

Postage 

Printing and binding 

Radio equipment and supplies 

Repairs (buildings) 
Rental (land) 

Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegrams 

Tools, implements, etc. . 
Travel .... 
Other expenses 

Reimbursements — cities, towns and fire districts (under G. L. (Ter. Ed 
c. 48, s. 24) 



$ 55 450 95 
50 00 



11 292 45 

240 05 

8 259 16 

467 03 

447 81 

66 99 
5 496 27 
2 928 50 

55 52 

300 75 
97 90 



18 457 17 

6 300 00 
417 98 
257 34 

1 453 25 

96 61 

240 00 

•596 35 

3 780 68 

1 408 85 

2 392 67 

76 70 



4110-21 Development of State Forests 
Inter-fund transfer to General Fund — Development of State Forests (Account 1002-21) 
— for nursery work ............ 

Total expenditures ............ 

Balance, June 30, 1947 



$109 264 10 



$109 264 10 



$ 66 284 49 

75 661 17 

$141 945 66 




4 539 63 $ 125 170 61 



3 678 00 


128 848 61 
13 097 05 


$141 945 66 











224 

FEDERAL GRANTS (Schedule No. 43)— Continued 

PITMAN-ROBERTSON ACT, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS - 
(4110-53) 
Gifts, grants and contributions: 

Contributions from the United States (Acts 1938, c. 392; 1945, c. 548) $ 12 390 63 

Less amount transferred to Inland Fisheries and Game Fund — 
Department of Conservation (for wild life restoration projects) 
—see Schedule 35 12 390 63 

Total expenditures — Department of Conservation, 8128,848.61 

Department of Education Activities 

MASSACHUSETTS PUBLIC BUILDING COMMISSION 
(Acts 1943, c. 517, s. 2; 1947, c. 466, s. 6) 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE— FITCHBURG— GYMNASIUM PE9 

Balance, July 1, 1946 and June 30, 1947 (no transactions in 1947) . . . 

MASSACHUSETTS PUBLIC BUILDING COMMISSION 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE— SALEM— FIREPROOFING STAIRWAY 

RECEIPTS 
Balance, July 1, 1946 (no receipts in 1947) ........ 

EXPENDITURES 
(4106-14) 
Professional services (architects and engineers) ........ 

Balance, June 30, 1947 

AID TO THE BLIND— ADMINISTRATION, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) . . . . . 
Balance, July 1, 1946 

EXPENDITURES 
(4113-01) 
Personal services ............. 

Professional services (consultants) .......... 

Blueprints, photostats, etc. ........... 

Electricity .............. 

Medical care ............. 

Office furniture ............. 

Postage .............. 

Rental (office) ............. 

Repairs (office machines) ........... 

Stationery, printing and office supplies ......... 

Telephone and telegrams ........... 

Travel 

Typewriters .............. 

Other expenses ............. 

Total expenditures ............ 

Balance, June 30, 1947 



AID TO THE BLIND— GRANTS IN AID, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) ..... 
Miscellaneous (refunds of prior years' payments) ...... 



P.D. 140 



$5 900 00 



PE8 



Total receipts 
Balance, July 1, 1946 



Subsidies (to blind persons) 
Balance, June 30, 1947 . 



EXPENDITURES 
(4113-02) 



$875 00 



$ 722 60 
152 40 


S875 00 


$ 16 049 18 
241 25 


$16 290 43 


$ 12 853 61 

300 00 
88 00 
60 19 

202 50 
171 72 
183 78 
792 50 

16 23 

60 23 

314 81 

1083 47 

129 93 
7 75 


16 264 72 
25 71 


$16 290 43 


$307 258 25 
359 75 


307 618 00 
5 872 33 


$313 490 33 


$295 580 00 
17 910 33 


$313 490 33 



PART II 



225 



FEDERAL GRANTS (Schedule No. 43)— Continued 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION— SMITH HUGHES AND GEORGE DEEN ACTS, 

U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 



Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States): 

Vocational Education Trust, United States Grant (G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 74, ss. 19-22): 
Smith-Hughes and George Deen Acts ....... 

Less amount transferred to General Fund receipts to reimburse the Department 
of Education for supervision in the agricultural division .... 



Total receipts (net) 
Balance, July 1, 1946 



EXPENDITURES 
(4113-21) 



Personal services ..... 
Professional services (instructors and lecturers) 
Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. 
Reimbursements (cities and towns) . 
Travel 



Inter-fund transfer to General Fund — Department of Education- 
tional Schools (Account 1301-31) 



-Teachers for Voca- 



Total expenditures 
Balance, June 30, 1947 



S465 041 34 

11 200 00 

453 841 34 
61 925 24 

$515 766 58 



$ 24 680 00 

5 574 00 
284 40 

385 176 37 

6 479 90 

422 194 67 

36 045 03 

458 239 70 
57 526 88 

8515 766 58 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 



Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) 
Miscellaneous (refunds of prior years' payments) 

Total receipts 
Balance, July 1, 1946 



EXPENDITURES 
(4113-29) 

Personal services ............. 

Professional services (sundry) ........... 

Non-professional services (sundry) .......... 

Office and administrative expenses: 

Books, maps, etc. . " . . . . . . . . S 176 36 

Electricity 345 38 

Express, freight, etc. ......... 31 93 

Mimeographing, multigraphing, etc. ...... 144 60 

Office furniture and files 1 062 56 

Office machines (purchased) ....... 772 08 

Outside laundry 102 28 

Paper for printing ......... 56 25 

Postage 938 80 

Printing and binding ......... 387 43 

Rental (office) 5 540 60 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment ..... 80 17 

Stationery and office supplies ....... 1 747 76 

Telephone and telegrams ........ 821 12 

Travel 8 597 66 

Medical care ............. 

Medical supplies and equipment ..... 

School books, instructional supplies and equipment ....... 

Tuition .............. 

Other expenses ...... ... . . 

Total expenditures .......... 

Balance, June 30, 1947 . 



$159 154 68 
21 60 


159 176 28 
45 935 77 


S205 112 05 


$118 491 50 
238 00 
109 30 



20 804 98 

7 233 64 

4 695 04 

2 400 55 

50 159 52 

29 17 


204 161 70 
950 35 


$205 112 05 



226 P.D. 140 

FEDERAL GRANTS (Schedule No. 43)— Continued 

FARM LABOR PROGRAM, U. S. GRANT- 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

RECEIPTS 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) ...... 85 000 00 

EXPENDITURES 
(4113-32) 

Co-operative work with Federal Government (allotment to University of Massachusetts) $5 000 00 

MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY, U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 
(4113-51) 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) . . . $25 000 00 
Less amount transferred to General Fund — Department of Education 
— Massachusetts Maritime Academy — for maintenance (Sched- 
ule 13) 25 000 00 

MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY— SUBSISTENCE OF MIDSHIPMEN, 

U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 
(4113-52) 

From the United States $ 34 957 50 

Less amount transferred to General Fund — Department of Education 
— Massachusetts Maritime Academy — reimbursement for sub- 
sistence of midshipmen (Schedule 13) .... . 34 957 50 

Total expenditures — Department of Education, $979,968.72 

Department or Laboh and Industries Activities 

EMPLOYMENT SECURITY— ADMINISTRATION— U. S. GRANT 

RECEIPTS 

Gifts, grants and contributions (from the United States) — G. L. (Ter. Ed.) c. 151A, s. 60, 

as amended $4 771 766 82 

Sales (waste paper) ............ 984 51 

Miscellaneous (commission on pay station receipts) ....... 4 202 25 

Total receipts 4 776 953 58 

Balance, July 1, 1946 161 853 87 

$4 938 807 45 
= 
EXPENDITURES 
(4116-01) 

Personal services $3 950 404 80 

Professional services (sheriffs and constables) ........ 1 751 69 

Non-professional services (cleaners, janitors, etc.) ....... 7 091 70 

Office and administrative expenses: 

Advertising $ 1 152 85 

Books, maps, etc. ......... 1 426 89 

Electricity 37 395 67 

Express, freight, etc 4 177 32 

Office furniture and files ........ 4 437 35 

Office machines (purchased) ....... 6 628 93 

Postage 958 19 

Premium on bonds ......... 802 50 

Printing and binding ........ 450 58 

Rentals: 

Offices $264 517 19 

Office machines 165 086 46 429 603 65 

Repairs to office furniture and equipment ..... 5 161 42 

Stationery and office supplies ....... 164 692 42 

Telephone and telegrams 69 236 79 

Travel 57 403 75 

Other 1 816 71 785 345 02 

Repairs (buildings) 43 348 92 

Pensions and retirement allowances . . . . . . . . . . 5 718 26 

Other expenses ............. 15 08 

Total expenditures 4 793 675 47 

Balance, June 30, 1947 145 131 98 

$4 938 807 45 



STATISTICS 






^I»A«CXAL RBPOh'P OF THE DlSFARHHfllT OF EDUCATION 
Fi»oal Period Ended June 30, 1947 

(Pros Twenty-Fifth Annual Rep or t of the Depart- 
ment of Administration and Finance) 



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III a. TRANSPOBIATION 
(Chapter 71, Section 7a, (o.679, 1947)) 



Chapter 679 

THE COMMONWEALTH OP MASSACHUSETTS 

In the Year One Thousand Bine Hundred and Forty- seven 



S^C HON 1, Chapter 71 of the General Laws Is hereby 
mded by Inserting after section 7 the following section:* 
Section 7a. The state treasurer shall annually, on or be- 
fore November twentieth, pay to the several towns from the 
proceeds of the tax on Incomes, which shall be available 
therefor subject to appropriation, the sums required as 
reimbursement for expenses approved by the commissioner of 
education. Incurred by any town for the transportation of 
pupils once dally to and from any school within the town, 
or In another town, In excess of five dollars per annum 
per pupil in the net average membership of such town} 
provided, (a) that no transportation reimbursement shall 
be made on account of any pupil who resides less than one 
and one half miles from the school which lie attends, 
measured by a commonly travelled route; and (b) that the 
amount of grant, per pupil, for transportation to private 
schools In towns which furnish such transportation, shall 
not exceed the amount of grant per pupil for transportation 
to public schools* There shall be allocated from the pro- 
ceeds of tho tax on Incomes such sums as the commissioner 
of education shall certify as necessary for the payment of 
such reimbursement. No town shall be reimbursed for Its 
transportation expense. In any year, an amount less than 
the amount of reimbursement for such expense received In 
the year nineteen hundred and forty-six. 



Distribution, Nov. 20, 1947: — (on basis of school 

year, 1940-47) 

256 towns received $1,117. 291*02 

96 towns were not entitled to receive 
reimbursement because the expense 
Incurred was not "In excess of $5.00 
per annum per pupil in net average 
membership. 



**>•*-* 



IV » CERTIFICATION OP TgAJhit-RS IN 
SIAT^-AID'aD HIGH SCHOOLS 



teachers In State-aided high schools, of which 
there were 27 in 1946-47, are required by Chapter 71, 
Section 12 of General Laws, to hold Certificates issued 
vy the Department of Education • Applicants are issued 
Certificates on credentials without examination. 
Teachers in the regaining high schools and teachers in 
elementary schools are not required to hold lerm Certifi- 
cates, 

There is only one kind of Certificate now granted, 
namely, the Term Certifies ue, the requirements of which 
arc stated in a circular of lnf ormation, distributed by 
the Department of Education. There was formerly in the 
Department a Special Certificate, and these are renewed, 
but no new ones are granted. Ihe total number of high 
school teachers 1 Term Certificates granted up to June oO, 
U47 was 2491. 

In extraordinary oases, a Permit to teach one or 
more specified subjects in a particular state-aided high 
school may be issued by the Department. In 1942-43 there 
were 24 Permits granted; In 1943-44 there were 60; in 
1944-45 there were 53; in 1945-46 there were 66; and in 
1946-47 there were 66. 



ft *~, 



V. THASSPOR'IAflOII OF CHILDREN LIVING OH ISLANDS 



Chapter 76, section 14 of the General Lave provides 
that*- n 3be department of education may provide transporta- 
tion to and from school, or board in place thereof, for 
such children of school age as live upon islands within 
the commonwealth that are without schools, in oases whsre 
the local authorities are not required by law to provide 
sueh transportation." ^Op* A, G. (1920) 21 J 

During the school year 1946-47 there was only one 
child who came within the above classification and the 
expense entailed amounted to $114,80. 



VI. COUNTS TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Has following table gives a list of the oounty training 
schools in the State for the coimaitment of habitual truants, 
absentees, and school offenders! 

Oounty irainlng, School Location Superintendent 

iissex Lawrence James H. Iwtler 

Hampden Agawam Howard S. herrlok 

Middlesex (1) North Chelmsford J. arl Wot ton 

Worcester Oakdale William T. Toachout 

The counties of Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol, Dukes, 
Franklin, Hampshire, Han tucket, Norfolk, and Plymouth are 
exempted by law from maintaining training schools of their 
own, out the county commissioners of each of these counties 
are required to assign an established training school as a 
place of commitment for habitual truants, absentees, and 
school offenders. The places designated by several com- 
missioners are as follow: Berkshire, Franklin, and Hampshire 
Counties, Agawamf Barnstable, Dukes, Bristol, Nantuoket, 
Norfolk, and Plymouth Counties, North Chelmsford. 

(1) Under the law, commitments from Boston, Chelsea, 
Revere, and Wlnthrop in Suffolk County must be to the 
training school for the oounty of Middlesex. 



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£23 



VIII. G2HERAL SCIS)OL FlffiD 
(Chapter 70, General Lave) 



224 



Distribution tinder Part I (Hov. 20, 1947): 



General 

Supplemen tary 



i 4, 686,728.33 
146,122.00 



1|4,834, 650.33 



Distribution under Part XX 
(March 10, 1947) i 

Ibwns in which the proportionate 
amount paid by such towns of 
every thousand dollars of State 
tax as established by the last 
preceding valuation made for the 
purpose of apportioning such tax; 

Class 1-8/ or less 

Glass II-More than %i but not mora 

chsn lo>> 
Class Ill-More timn 16/ but not more 

than 40/ 
Class IV -More than 40/ but not more 

than 50/ 



fc 51, 22b. 30 

54,071.70 

213,487.64 

63, 99b. 57 



t402,7bt>.09 



From income tax (Part X) 
From income of Massachusetts 

School Fund (Part XI) 
From income tax (Part XX) 



$4,854,850.33 

152,786.09 
250,000.00 



£5,237,636.42 



225 



TABLK HO. 1 - Renter of State-aided Vocational 

and part-time sohcols. 

School Year ending; August 31, 1946 

Three hundred and twenty-eight (all) schools in operation during the 
year (or now) in ninety-three cities and towns listed chronologically 
by types of schools, with dates of establishment and names of Directors* 

Group I la. Thirty-six industrial sohools (boys) 

Smith's Agricultural (Northampton), Oct., 1908| Philip : ox. 

New Bedford Vocational, Not., 1909 j William R. Mackintosh. 

Newton Trade, eb., 190 J] Janes Forbes. 

Worcester Boys' Trade -igh, 'eb., 1910j "alter B. Dennen. 

Ocroerrille Vocational School for Boys, Sept., liilOj Philip J. Hcffernan. 

Lowell Vocational, c ept., I9ll| Halter J* torkhara. 

Springfield Trade, ^ept., 1911j George A. Burridge. 

Westfield Trade, r ept., 1911| Chester C. Derby. 

Boston Trade High, eb., 1912 j Edward &• MoDonough. 

Quinoy Trade, *ept., 1912 | Prank C. Webster. 

Holyoke Vocational, "ept., 1914| William J. Dean. 

Diman Vocational High (Pall River), May, 1;*16| Joseph P. filligan* 

Independent Industrial Shoamaking School of the City of Lynn, 

Aug., 1918| ' tephen R. Callahan. 
Chioopee Trade, p ept., 1921 | John H. "ullivan. 
Weymouth Voaational, ''eb., I924j Francis H. "*hippl«, Jr. 
Vineyard Haven Carpentry School (Tisbury), Sept., 1928| "rvln Arbo 
Beverly Trade, Nov., 1926} Claude H. Patten. 

Charles W, Arnold Trade (Haverhill), Nov., lJ26j Chester P. Spofford. 
Tverett Vocational High, Sept., I927j John W. Bates. 
Arthur A. Hansen Trade, t altham, Sept., 1928f Harold L. Pride. 
iedford Vocational, Nov., 1930f Melvin V. Teldon* 
Cole Trade, Day, ( r outhbridge), Mar., 1932| Clark H. Worrell. 
Plttsfield Vocational, A ril, 1934| John F. "oran. 
"axton Trade (Leominster), Sept., 1934| Rodney F. Poland. 
~> le*.i Vocational, f-ept., 1934| Agnes V. Craven. 
Attleboro Jewelry Trade, Nov., 1j34j Frank H. Straier. 
Oak Bluffs Trade, Jan., 1936j Charles F. Downs. 
Greenfield Vocational, June, 1936| Ralph A. Lawrence. 
Barnstable Trade, 'ov., 1938| Theodore W. Glover. 
North Adams Vocational, Aug., 1940| Charles MoHann. 
Maiden Vocational, Sept., 1941| Lnroy ". Twiohell. 
Marlboro Vocational, ^ept., 1941| Warren P. 'sddox. 
Mewburyport Vocational, ^ept., 1943 j Patrick J. urnane. 
Norwood Vocational, c ept., 1944j Clifford H. "heeler. 
Peabody Vocational, *>pt., 1944} Alfred Hurley. 
Lynn Vocational, Sept., 1945| Ralph *« Babb. 



226 



Group I lb. Fir* Day Indus trial senools (girls) 

Trade Sahool for Girls (Boston), Sept., IfOSj Esther L. MoKeUis. 

David Hale "arming Trade High tohool for Girls (Worcester), Sept., 1911j 

Blanche M. Perm. 
Springfield Trade School for Girls, Jan., 1S34| George A* Burridge. 
Arthur A. Hansen Trade School for Girls, Sept., 1939; Harold L. Pride. 
Henry 0. Peabody Trade School, Norwood, Sept., 1942j Blanche L. areionette. 

Group I lo. Seven Industrial Departments 

Brighton Industrial, ^eb., 1929 j Percy A. Brifcham. 

Charleatown Industrial, ^eb., 192Si Edward 'laherty. 

Dorchester Industrial, Feb., 1929 f Arlon 0* Bacon. 

East Boston Industrial, Feb., 1929 } Walter H. Naylor. 

Uyde Park: Induatrial, Feb., 1929 1 'ranois J. Lee. 

South Boston Industrial, Jan., 1929| Thomas A. Roche. 

Meaorial Eigh (Roxbury) Industrial, Sept., 1929 | Patrick J. Smith. 

Group I Id. Twenty-nine General Vocational 
Departments (Boys) 




Everett, Sept., 1834| John £• Bates. 

Leominster, Sept., 1934| Rodney ' . Poland* 

Lynn, Sept., 1934} Ralph ff. Babe. 

Newton, Sept., 1934 j James orbes. 

Salem, Sept., 1934 j Agnes V. Cragen. 

Taunton, 4>ept., 1934 j Patrick H. Lyons. 

ibridge, leeember, 1934 f Charles G. Barringtc 
erhill, Sept., 1936 i Chester P. Spofford. 



^Ke-established. 



fT^ g 



Group I 2a. One short unit course 
Boston* October, 1937j Leo Henaud* 

Group I 3s* Ten pert-tine Ccope retire Schools 



\ 



\ 



■ ■ 



Beverly Co-operative Trade. Aug*. 1909) Claude K* Patten. 
Boston t 

Charleston, Sept.. 1919| Edward laherty* 

Hyde Parle, Sept., 1919 1 raneis J* Lee. 

Dorehester, Sept*, 1920 | Arlon 0* Bacon* 

Brighton, Sept., 1922 1 Percy A* Brigham. 

rast Boeton, June, 192Sj '-alter R. Naylor. 

South Boston, Jaa., 1929 j Thomas A. Koohe. 

Memorial High (Foxbury), Sept., 1929} Patrick J. Smith. 

Cole Trade, Southbridge, Sept*, 1919| Clark H. Worrell. \ 

Arthur A* Hansen Co-operative Trade, altham, July, 1940 1 Harold \\.» Pride. 

Group I 5b. Ten Trade Preparatory Schools 
(classes) 

Plymouth, Oct., 1936} Burr F* Jones* 

Springfield, Sept., 1841 | George A* 3urridge. 

Newton, N'ov., 1943| James Forbes* 

Worcester, Jan., 1944f vralter P. Dencen. 

Arlingt rn, Sept., 1944} Arthur Robinso . 

Holyoke, Jot., 1944 ; Edward J* Burke. 

Boston, "eb., 194b i Leo Renaud* ' 

Hudson, eb., 194b | faobert a* ^aoCarthy* 

'ramingham, June, 194b | Joseph P. £ecfe* 

Taunton, A ril, 1946| Patriok H. Lyons. 

Group I So. Seven Apprenticeship Schools 
(olasses) 

Pittsfield, Sept., 1927] John . . Koran. 
Sewton, Oct., 1939) James ;orbes. 

altham, Oct., 1942) Harold L. Pride, 
fforoester, March, 1943) waiter B. Dennen. 
Springfield, Oct., 1944 1 ) George A* Burridge* 
Boston, .Nov., 194b | Leo 0. Renaud* 
Slouoester, Nov*, 1946| Leonard H. Scott. 

Group I 3d. Vocational Art Schools (classes) 

Massaohusetts School of Art, lov., 1927) 'rank L. Allen* 

l&e-e stab ii shed* 












Group I 4a. Thirty-two evening Industrial 
School! (Men) 

Sew Bedford Evening Vooetional, Uov., 1907| William R. Mackintosh. 

Lawrence, M&roh, 1908} Tranoia X. Ho fan, 

Boston Trade School, Evening Classes, Oot., 1908 f Charles Loherty. 

Newton Evening Vooetional, Feb., 1909| James "orbes. 

Worcester Boys 1 Evening Tradm, Feb., If 10; 'alter B. Dennen. 

Springfield Evening Trade, Feb., 1916 j Thomas J. Morrison. 

Beverly, Nov., 1918 j Claude H. Patten. 

Lynn Evening Industrial Shoenaking, Jan., 1927 j Stephen R. Callahan. 

Medford Evening Vooetional, :^ov. # 1930| Kelvin V. ^eldon. 

Cembridge Evening industrial, Jan., 1934 f John M. Tobin. 

Pittsfield Evening Vooetional, April, 1956 1 ! John ft Moran. 

Cole Trade Evening (Southb ridge), Oct., 1936 1 ! Clark fi. orrell. 

Horthbridge, Oot., 1941 j James S. &ullaney. 

Northampton, April, 1944 i Philip "ox. 

rail River, Oot., 1944 1 ; Joseph P. Oilligan. 

Holyoke, A^ril, 1945| William J. Dean. 

Chioopee, June, 1945j John E. Sullivan. 

Brookton, -ept., 1945 1 ) Kenriek M. Baker. 

Everett, Oot., 194S 1 ! John S. Bates. 

ramingham, Oct., 1945j Joseph ieefe. 
Greenfield, Oct., 1945j Ralph A. Lawrence. 
Lowell, Oot., 1945*1 Salter J. 'iarkhaa. 
maiden, Oct., 1945 1 Leroy fl. Twlohell. 
Peabody, Oot., 1945| Alfred Hurley. 
Salem, Oct., 1945 S Agnes V. Cragen. 
Taunton, Oct., 1945 1 ! Patrick B. Lyons. 
Barnstable, Nov., 1945 j Theodore V* Glover. 
Leominster, gov., 1 45*j Rodney F« Poland. 
Quinoy, Nov., 1945^, John L. mahoney. 
Raltham, Nov., 1945 i Harold L. Pride. 
Fitohburg, D«e», 1945| VTataon H. Otis. 
North Adams, Jareh 1946| Charles HbCann. 

Group II. Twenty-one Compulsory Continuation 
Sohools 

Boston, Sept., 1914| Henry D. Pal lone. 
Attleboro, Sept., 192uj ' orman S. Tukey. 
Brookton, Sept., 1920 j r.euriok !»• Baker. 
Cambridge, apt., 1920j Charles 0. Harrington. 
Chioopee, Copt., 1920} John H. Sullivan. 
Haverhill, S«pt., 192. j ?/illiam * f Dunbar. 
Law »ce», ~ept., 1920j ranois X. Hogan. 
Leejjeineter, ;;ept., 192j| liodney v » Foland. 
Lowii.1, Sent., litOj Thomas A. iinty. 
Lynn, Sept., 192- i Ralph t* Babb. 
Hew Bedford, Sept., 1920 j Hobert lurdy. 
lorthbridge, Sept., 1920) Jemes la tfullaney. 

' ished. 






K*«a 



Group II* Twenty-one Compulsory Continuation 
Schools (Cont'd.) 

Pittsfield, Sept., 1920 j John F. Moran. 
Salem, Sept., 1920 j Agnes V* Cragen. 
Some rvi lie, Sept., 1920) Everett W. Ireland. 
Southbrid^e, Sept., 192>) Clark H« Worrell. 
Springfield, Sept., 1920 j George a. Burridge. 
Taunton, Sept., 1920) Patriok n. Lyons. 
Worcester, Sept., 1920 j Paul J. Corcoran. 
Gilford, Sept., 1921| David I. DaTonen. 
Andover, Sept., 1923 i Carl M. Gahan. 

Group Til la. Six day homemakinr school* 

New Bedford Household Arts, Not., 1907} Rilllam K. ¥ao-intosh. 
Smith's Household Arts (Northampton), Got., 1908| Philip Fox. 
Lowell Vocational, *>ept., 1911} Salter J. Markham. 
Essex County School for Homemakine; (Eathorne), Sept., 1914) 

Harold A. Mostrom. 
WOreester Household Arts, Jan., 1931) Blanohe tf. Penn. 
Salem Household Arts, Sept., 1935 j Agnes V. Cragen. 

Group III lb. Forty-soTen day household 
arts departments. 

Fall KiTer Household Arts, Nor., 1919) Charles V. Carroll. 
Boston household Arts, Feb., 1920) Mabel E. Bowker. 
Somerrille Household Arts, Rot., 1920 1 ¥rs. Amy Webber, Acting. 
Everett Household Arts, March, 1921) Frederick A. Ashley. 
Seituate household Arts, Sept., 1921) rederlek A. Calkin. 
Badley Household Arts, April, 1922) James P. Reed. 
Pittsfield Household Arts, Sept., 1922) John 
Weymouth Household Arts, r eb., 1924) Wellaoe 
West port Household Arts, ^areh, 1924) Milton 
Haverhill Household Arts, Sept., 1924) Lyman 
Falmouth Household Arts, April, 1925) Russell 
Belehertown Household Arts, STaroh, 1925) M. ■ eroy Greenfield. 
Shelburne Household Arts, Sept., 1926) Thomas .. atkins. 
Bourne Fousehold Arts, Sept., 1928) James P« Peebles. 
Deerfleld Household Arts, Sept., 1980) A. Jerome Goodwin. 
ProYirctown Household Arts, Not., 1931) Alton |« Ramey. 
8outhbri.uge t ousehold Arts, Sept., 1832) James M. Robertson. 
Townsend household Arts, Oct., 1932) J. ^tt\9 Quimby. 
Barnstable Household Arts, kept., 1935) ' rederlok N. Hodge. 

^eter Household Arts, Not., 1933) ^yrll C. Smith. 
Broekton Household Arts, Jan., 193b) Ralph •'•• Haskins. 
forth Adams Household Arts, Jan., 1935) Piohard Anketeli. 
Dartmouth fiousehold Arte, Sept., 1936) OaTid J. Adair. 

it on Household *rts, Sept., 1935) Dana 0. »ebber. 
Wow Salem Househol arts, Sept., 1935) Joseph Cleohon. 
Palmer ousehold Arts, -ept., 1985) ?. H« Peyton. 
Bolllston Household *rts, eo., 1936) red ft. Jiller. 



r« 


:-'oran. 


L. 


Whittle. 


E. 


fcarle. 


B. 


Owen* 


B 


. Marshall. 






Group III lb. Forty-seven day household arts 
departments (Cont'd.) 

Winohendon Household Arts, Sept*, 1336} Donovan S* Jones* 
Adams Household Arts, Sept*, 1936 j J, I ranklin arreil. 
Hatfield Household Arts, Sept*, 1936 1 } John C* Jakobek. 
Great Harrington household Arts, Feb., 1937 j Kenneth "'. Preston. 
Beverly Household Arts, Sept*, 193?j Frederick Pieroe* 
Hudson ousehold Arts, Sept., 1938} Robert £• ifaoCarthy* 
Lee Household Arts, Sept*, 1938} Arthur L. Vieloome. 
Randolph Household Arts, Sept., 1938j ubert : . Oilgan. 
Avon Household Arts, Sept., 1939} H. Carroll Oilman. 
Harshfleld Household Arts, Sept*, 1939 1 James Borneo. 
Morthbridge Household arts, Sept., 1939 j Barrie J. Phipps. 
Agawam Household Arts, Sept., 1940 { "rederiok 7. a cay. 
ftewburyport Household Arts, Sept., 1941 i toward P. urtis. 
flfellfleet Household Arts, Sept., 1941| Alton £• Kameyi 
%est Bridgewater household Arts, Sept., 1941i Nils G. Lindell. 
Chieopae household Arts, Oat., 1941 i John L. "it spat ri ok. 
Norton Household Arts, -eo., 1942 | Charles Handall. 
•itohburg Household Arts, Sept., 1943 j Tatson H. Otis. 
Greenfield Household Arts, Sept., 1944} Ralph A. Lawreaoe. 
Orange household Arts, Nov., 1945} Hamilton R. Bailey* 

Group III le. Sixteen general Vocational 
Departments (girls) 

Springfield, Jan., 1934} George A. Burridge. 
. rookton, Mar oh, 1934} &enrlek :1. Baker* 
Morthbridge, Ifareh, 1934} James S. Uullaney* 
New Bedford, April, 1934} Robert Murdy. 
Pit .afield, April, 1934} John P. iioran. 
Lawrenoe, June, 1934} ; ranois X. Began* 
Attleboro, Sept., 1934} Korman S* Tukeyl 
Lverett, -apt., 1934} John W« Bates. 
Leominster, Sept., 1934} Rodney r . Poland. 
Taunton, "apt., 1934} Patriok H. Lyons. 
Cambridge, Tee., 1935} Chwrles G* Harrington. 
Pitehburg, July, 1936} '.atson H. Otis* 
Somerville, Nov., 1937} 'verett W. Ireland. 
Boaton, rapt., 1939} Henry Da 'allona. 
nolyoke, Jan., 1940} Henry J. Fitspatrlok. 
Fall Elver, Sept., 1942} Joseph P, lllli^an. 

Group III 3. Forty-eight praotleal art sohools 

New Pedford, Nov., 1937} William B. Vaokintoeh. 
Lawrenoe, Uareh, 1908} ; ranois X* Hogan* 
lewton, Peb#, 1 9} James orbes. 

Re-eet»blishad 






Group III 3* ^crty-eight practical art schools 
(Cont»di) 

Worcester (Independent Board), .'apt., 1911 j Blanche M. Penn. 

Lowell, Sept., 1911} alter J. I&rkhaa. 

Everett, Oat., 1911) Charles 9. Bates. 

Holyoke, Got., 1911) Uiliam H. Peek* 

Somerville, Oot., 1911) Jobn Mcifchon. 

Poston, Oot., 1912) Joseph F. Gould. 

tfethuen, Oot., 1912) Lewis K. Oonant. 

Leominster, eb., 1916) Donald -eary. 

Bssex County (EUthorne) July, 1918) Harold A. Mostrom. 

Beverly, Sept., 1919) Lester Ayers. 

Lynn, 'eb., 1920) Raymond ft Grady. 

Chioopee, ?Jot., 1921) John P. "itzpatriok. 

Medford, Oot., 1922) Katharine A. Baker. 

Hroekton, tfoT., 1926) Kenriok J4. Raker. 

Somerset, Sept., 1928) Austin *>» Toole. 

Rookport, April, 1929) nillam Cottle. 

.ton, Mot., 1934 j John J. Rolfe. 
Kebster, Deo., 1934 ) Anthony J. Sitkowski. 
Gloucester, sfiaroh, 1985 ) Ernest W. Fellows t 
Springfield, Oot., 1935 1 ) Thomas J. Morrison. 
Salem, Oct., 1940*) Arnes V. Cregen. 
Vorthbridge, Dot., 1941) Janes S. Mullaney. 
Cambridge, Oct., 1942 1 ) Charles G. Harrington, 
fantuoket, Oot., 1942 1 ) Richard J. Porter. 
Northampton, April, 1942) Philip Fox. 
Fall Kiver, Ju.e, 1943 1 ) Joseph P. Oilligan. 
Pittsi'ieid, Oot., 1943) John *. Moran. 
Waltham, Nor., I943 1 ) John W. XoDeTitt. 
Plymouth, eb., 1944) Burr ft Jones. 
Medfield, Oct., 1944) E. Perley Eaton. 
Norwood, Oct., 1944) Blanahe 'areionette. 
Winohendon, Not., 1944) Donovan It Jones. 

ulson, Jan., 1946) 'ranees E. Rioe. 
Randolph, Aorll, 194b) Hubert F. Gil -an. 
Abington, April, 194o) Howard ft £aeon. 
Andover, Oot., 1945) Carl tf. Gahan. 
hrlstol County, Oct., 1945) George 3. Gilbert. 
Taunton, Oct., 1945) Patriok ii. Lyons. 
Quinoy, Nov., 1945) John I.. Mahoney. 
Jalden, Jan., 1946) Leroy U. Twiohell. 
Ihelbume, Jan., 1946) Thomas ft. atkins. 

astham, March, 1946) Charles H. Pratt. 
Hanson, ?teroh, 1946) Clliton K. Bradley. 
Uelrose, '.'arch, 1946) Herman H. Stuart. 
Milton, April, 1946) Horace r . Turner. 

l Re-establtshed. 



£3«£ 



Group 17 la. Four Agricultural Sohools 

Smith** (Northampton), Oct.. 1908| Philip fox. 
Bristol County* Sept., 1913f George it. Gilbert. 
Bim County, Oct., 1913 j Harold A. Mostrom. 
Norfolk County, Oct., 1916 j Charles W. Kemp. 

Weymouth Branch, Oct., 1916j Kilmer 3. Nelson, Instructor 

Group IV lb. nineteen vocational agricultural 
departments with names of instructors (day) 2 

Ashfield, Aug., 1915| George R. Tale. 
oroester, May, 1917| Andrew J. Love. 
Boston (Jamaica Plain), or., 1918} Thomas P. Dooley. 
Mew Salem, Sept., 1919| P.. Arthur Lundgren. 
Shelburne, March, 1920| Mlliam I. Tufts. 
West Sprirgfield, April, 1920| Herbert P, Bartlett. 
Falmouth, Sept., 1920j Lewis B. Robinson. 
Hatfield, Aug., 1921f Wallaee 0. Hibbard. 
nest port, Aug., 1925 j ftarold S. flood. 
Agawam, Aug., 1929} James P. Alexakee. 
Dartmouth, Sept., 1929} arl li. Frisson. 
Westfiel^, Oat., 1931 | Arthur L. Frelliek. 
Barnstsble, Sept., lS34f Arnold H. Roseau. 
Stookbridge, June, 1936| Kenneth W. tfilllgan. 
Templeton, July, 1937f Salter E. urtis. 
Williamstown, Au ., 1937| Charles L. Slater. 
Hudson, Aug., 1938| Larold A. Potter. 
Middleboro, Sept., 1940 | Stanley C. Reed. 
Deerfield, t>ept., 1944 j Robert Owers. 

Group XV 3. It.Iti vocational agricultural 
departments with names of direetors (evening) 

Essex County, Dec, 1926 1 Harold A. Mostrom. 
Bristol County, t., 1940 1 George ii. Gilbert. 
Norfolk County, Jan., 1946* j Charles W. Kemp. 
Hudson, Maroh, 1946| Robert K. /aeCarthy. 
Mid leboro, Sept., 194b $ Lindsey J. March. 

est Springfield, ^ept., 1945j John A. Rednond. 
lew Salem, eb., 1946| Joseph Cleohon. 
Worcester, r eb«, 1948 f Everett G. Sherwin. 
Shelburne, eb., 1946| Thomas *. Watklns. 
Are warn, March, 1»46| ' reHerlok T. r>eoe . 
Barnstable, Waroh, 1948 t >eodore V« Glover. 
Templeton, April, 1946| ark k, vtinson. 



Ee-esta >li*hed. 
'The Prlrielpal of the hlr.h sehool usually serves as director. 



\ 



13 



Croup v la* Seren Part-tiwe ,o-operatiee SlatrlbutLve 
Occupation Sohoola. 




lb. 



hree Part-time iatribufclTe 
Sehooie. 



..looupatlona 



Brockton, Nov., 1941j fceariok tt« Baker. 
Beaton, Juiy f 1&43 X | fc&wanl J- ;0*««. 
Marlboro, Leo., 1»43| • Joseph MoCook. 

roup 2. Seven evening Distrl utiva Ceeopatloa Sehooie. 

Sprin ileld, Oct., 1*41 j ;eorre A* Purridga» 
Beaton, April, 1&4S 1 ! Ntaftfi J* Roeae. 
Brockton, ' ov. t 194b | *enrlok H. Baker. 
Lynn, Kov., 134b i { Stephen P. Callahan. 
Pittafial , »©▼., IHiri John f* torts. 
Woroeater, eb., 1940 1 j Blanche M. Penn. 
Itilford, tteroa, 1S46| Tarld T. Dovoren. 



Re«eatabUahed. 



Table No. 3. unmerited Financial . tatement - all types of schoolsi by eitier., teams and counties 

3ohool Year ending August ol , 1946 

Key to tyj.es of schoolsi I. IHDU:;TRIAI, 1. Day a. Boyo (Onit Trade), b. Girls (Unit Trada), o. Industrial [apartments, d. General Departments, 2. Uiort Unit Courses 
a. Boys 5. Part-time a. Cooperative 1* r.egular Trade extension, 2. Unit Trade, b. Trade Preparatory, c. Apprenticeship, d. Vocational Art, 4. livening a. Mer-i 
II. CO TIHDATIOBi III. HOU; KHOLD AliTS 1. Day a. bchool, b. High School .lepartment, c. General Department, 3. Kveningi IV. Ad , QLTDBma 1. Day a. School, I. !s t u 
school Department, 3. Evening! V. DIETRIBTJT1VI: OC DPATIOHS 1. Part-time a. Cooperative, b. Part-time, 2. Evening. 



CITIB, Tom 



COURII 



Iblngtoa IXI S 

Adam! III lb 

Agaeam III lb, IV lb, 8 

Andover II, III I 

Arlington I Sb 

Aihfleld IV lb 

Attltboro I la. Id, II, III lo Vlb 

Avon III lb 

Barnstable I la, Id, 3b, 4a, III lb, ivib, 8 

Belohertoan III lb 

Belaoat I Id 

Beverly I la, Sa, 4a, III lb, 3 

Boston I la, lb, lo. Id, 2a, Sa, Sb, 4a, II, 

III lb, lo, 3, IV lb, V la, lb, 2 
Bourne III lb 
Bristol County III 3, IV Is, * 



"1 
I* 

11 

P 

!i 

•a* 

■p • 
■9 S 

g3 



— f— 



667.82 
2.440.31 

4.302.88 
1.170.08 
2.8SO.OO 
2.842.04 

21,208.74 
1,2 80 .23 

22,108.67 

2,021.87 

37.760.81 

68.828.80 

1,287,188.12 
3,218.43 

152. 566 .41 



1,960.00 

128.81 

693.68 
202 .86 

26,945.63 

2,959.42 



263.48 

2 70.80 

2,701.41 
1,277.98 

16.o06.48 

7.88 

1,083.21 



667.92 
2,440.31 

4,802.88 
1,170.08 
2,860.00 
2.842.04 

18,988.28 
1,280.26 

21.706.48 
2.021.67 

34,465.96 

68,449.27 

1,244,986.04 

3.211.60 
148.612.78 



Utii 
ill! 

u m u 

a a o -i 

Ifl! 

m 5 o 

5 u 8 

M?J 




8A 

668.27 
2.440.81 

4,302.88 
1,170.08 

2,860.00 

2,842.04 
18,968.26 

1,260.28 
21,765.66 

2,021.57 
34,466.96 
66,891.87 

1,248.360.93 

3,211.80 

148,612.78 



664.70 
416.78 

175.64 

2,600.00 
484.44 

1.379.82 

76.98 

4.630.W 

287.22 

7,407.22 

20,486.67 

175,708.72 

98.77 

42.217.68 



is 

IB 

13 1 

fel. 

- i 
■a c 

T.S3 

a « 
U o 

In 

°3 . 

§ ss 

S3- 

ill 



29.70 

260.00 



400J2P 
660.81 

383.16 

4.403.86 

46,687.72 
3,908.00 



i 



is 

il 

31 



7A 



186. 

306 



308, 

748, 

76. 

1,082. 

98. 

287. 

3,604. 

61,836, 

88, 

3,218, 



626.00 



2,600.00 

210.00 

70.00 

2,326.00 

168.46 

6,661.26 

3,122.02 

30,702.66 

2,776.67 



78 



.98 

236.70 

134.76 

17,088.64 
7,168.48 



m s 

S3 



6,446.61 



P « <H * 

5 -H O I <# 

3 a c 

" e 3 J * „. 1 

1 " $ 1 s a J 

f 18-5 Zi 

* o L a o •& 

** o 3 q -h ^ -o 

+» q no ■ 

Cud -■ 

§io 3 *j a © 
■P Q.-H Q 

(3d 



3 (J (O <m CH' 



3fi li ~~ ~ o a 3 
o tj-d d 4> o 6 

8«*85^55 

-P rH a f «H c 



S^3 



s:3a 



13.22 
2,023.65 
4,091.79 
1,170.08 
260.00 
2,170.60 

17,566.44 
1,184.27 

17,129.81 
1,734.38 

27,048.73 

44,962.40 

1,033,808.1 
3,112.63 
106,296.15 



REIKB'JBJBMW 




9 

6.61 

1,011.78 

2,505.94 

586.04 

130.00 

1,320.69 

8,886.20 

592.14 

9,298.89 

667.18 

13,524.36 

22,491.20 

629,106.27 

1,556.41 

53,147.57 






i 8 J 

■ O ■* 

& .-; 

I 5 * 

■ 
a *i ■ a 

O 1 <H O 

■P «( 4> -W 

21^3 



14.85 
140.00 



226.00 
217.32 

191.68 

2,201.68 
23,328.88 
1,954.00 



S3 
•p at 
o a 



■ o 

*9 
.1 



n 

21.48 

1,151.78 

2,605.94 

586.04 

130.00 

1,546.59 

9,073.62 

592.14 

9,490.47 

8G7.18 

13,524.96 

24,692.08 

652,435.12 
1,556.41 
65,101.57 



PRODUCTIVITY 



* 8, 
«? 8. 

S-* 

9 « 

© -TV {, 

> rH 3 
t> O 

8 5 W 

j= -d 3 

111 



468.57 
2,667.49 

20,113.84 

26,160.67 



-3 



^1 

w -3 



-Tsr 



5 3 

O P 

V. « 

O W 

11 
II 



S o *h 3 

■** -e „* y 

4» 4> 00 . 

-co e 
o 1> . ba 
h o e e 

a e a 

. bO 

tji • 

— « 0,0 



e o — a 
.aov j 
o — o c e 



14 

4,932.76 

714.60 

16,450.86 

4,316.10 

8,232.44 

1,596.95 

673.77 

44,093.66 

564.65 

4,132.60 

66,467.64 

665,618.41 

997.60 

116,094.84 



■* 

'■ 

» f 



Brockton I Id. II. Ill lb. lo. ». in, V In. 

lb. 2 
CMbrtdfO I Xd, 4n, II. Ill lo. 3 
Chlooptt I In. Id. *•. II. I" ". 8 
ntrtpouth III lb. IV lb 
D„rfUld III lb, IV lb 
Dlthto" I »d. Ill lb. 8 
lutnu III * 

U1 tx county III lo. ». IV X». t 
twttt I In. Xd. Sb, 4«. II. Ill lb. lo. 1 
fnll Unr I In, 4n, III lb. Xo. 8 
KUcouth III lb. IV Xb 
ritohburj I Id, 4n, III lb. lo 
fr«»la«bn» ISb, in 
Olouottttr I Id. 8b. 8o, III 8 
On*t Snrrington III lb 
Orttnfltld I I». Id. Sb, 4n, Ill lb 
ILdlty III Xb 
BUIOD III 8 
Butfltld III lb, IV lb 
MTtrbill I !■> Id, II, "I Xb 
Hollliton III Xb 
Bolyokn I In, Sb, 4n, II Xo, 8 
Budton I 8b, III Xb, 8, IV Xb, 8 
UmnM I Id. in, II, III Xo, 8 
U. Ill lb 

Uonlnttar I In, Id, «n, II. Ill lo, 8 
Until I In, 4n, II. Ill In. 8, V In 
Lym I In. Id, 4n. II. Ill 8, V lb. 8 
u.ldtn I In. in. Ill 8. V Xb 
llnrlbore I In, V Xb 
Itarthfitld III Xb 
ttdfltld III 8 

i.dford I Xn, Xd, in. III 8, V Xn 
lolrotl III 8 
L'ttbutn III 8 
Klddl.boro 17 lb, 8 
Wlford I 1., 8b, II, V 8 
Hilton III 8 
Itntuoktt I Id, III 8 

In 9tdford I Xn, Xd, in, II, III In, lo, 8 
Snburyport I In, III lb 
In Snlon III lb, IV lb, 8 
tnton I In, Id, Sb, So, in. III 8 
lerfolk County IV In, 8 
lorth Adnct I In, in. III lb 
lorthmpton I In, in. III In, 8, IV In 
torthbrldcn I Xd, in, II, III Xb, Xo, 8 
Norton III lb 
llorrood I In, Xb, III S 
Otk Bluffi I In 
Cruet III Xb 
Pnlntr III lb 
PHbody I In, in 



45.641.08 

48.713,67 

77,816.97 

6,694.16 

7,966.04 

10,977.4? 

96.98 

266.237 .4T 

90,678i66 

98,822.48 

6,907.90 

68,8X7.10 

X9.408.76 

41,906.31 

2,469.74 

42,988.40 

2.490.88 

82.84 

b. Oil. 43 

94,162.47 

1,696.88 

86,488.30 

8,082,20 

46,806.68 

2,869.98 

42.680. 18 

102.496.23 

106,942.88 

29,242.28 

8,122.40 

2,299.49 

140.00 

T8.70S.17 

137.60 

4.720.06 

4,084.28 

267.31 

676.09 

X2.680.7X 

288,298. 7i 

19, Hi. 68 

8,442. GO 

126,127.72 

140,472.89 

14,804.99 

103,796.68 

XX, 707.87 

X, 263.74 

67,226.21 

3,046.1b 

1.691.99 

3,563 .46 

16.041.92 



316.66 

64.76 

7,449.80 



6,316.41 
78.70 



20.66 
114.94 



I8.f| 



508.43 
69.88 
84.48 

1,960.00 



1,333.38 



860.00 
2,469.76 

2,478.15 

979.60 

1, 11.91 



240.00 



1174.79 



1.0S3.11 
172.90 
986.81 

601.60 
706.08 

3,869.39 
1,969.14 
4,036.28 

X.6S0.S2 

1.376.86 

922.36 

89.70 

184.19 



103.34 
1,066.66 

829.46 

62.66 

X.326.48 

746.28 

I, 870. Si 

1,277.20 

827.88 

1,224.91 



38.00 

b. 29 

3,760.68 

282.68 

85.61 

2,246.97 

2,657.62 

816.00 

88.28 

38.10 

1,390.83 



2,509.37 



42.7C7.97 

46,640.87 

76,613.60 

6.694.46 

7,396.69 

10,272.39 

96.98 

253,918.48 

88,709.88 

88,786.17 

5.907.90 

61,166.67 

12,809.60 

40,^05.28 

2,370.04 

41, 919. IS 

2,460.38 

82.84 

4,911.63 

92,986.97 

1,696.22 

86.737.09 

8,082.20 

48,262.86 

2.669.98 

40.696.22 

10X.68X.82 

108,467.67 

27,966.08 

6,344.87 

2,296.48 

140.00 

77,478.26 

137.60 

4,720.08 

4.084.26 

267.31 

688.09 

11, 242.09 

258.545.16 

18.882.08 

7,856.99 

120.422.00 

136,430.12 

18,210.49 

106,696.39 

XX, 674.87 

1,263.74 

66,694.88 

3.045.X6 

X.69X.99 

3,668.46 

18.667.76 



42,787.97 
46,826.47 
77,6X8.20 
6,694.46 
7, 898.69 
10,272.39 

96.96 
263,918.48 
88.738.91 
88,786.17 
6,807.90 
61,186.87 
12,609.60 
40,905.26 
2.370.04 
41.919.19 
2.490.88 
62.64 
4,911.33 
92 ,988.97 
1,696.28 
86,200.81 
8.082.20 
48,309.86 
i.669.98 
4X.28X.88 
101,868.12 
109,798.87 
80.261.77 
9,218.18 
2,296.48 
140.00 
78,226.60 
187.60 
4,720.08 
4.084.26 
257.31 
643.94 
11,242.09 
258,814.16 
18.882.03 
7.858.99 
120,695.70 
186,430.12 
13,297.49 
106,020.54 
11,674.87 
1,263.74 
66,966.98 
3.046. 18 
X. 698.99 
8,663.46 
13,156.31 



11,102.68 

1,602.66 

2,640.44 

318.76 

1,918.68 

3,648.29 

160.00 

69.866.28 

13,684.21 

19,120.68 

949.47 

10,062.67 

6,811.70 

6,368.60 

323.71 

9.293.7X 

190.66 

60.00 

392.88 

8.324.46 

4S.86 

13.463.67 

2,969.88 

8,812.63 

226.41 

0, 678. 87 

X4.082.66 

82.66X.47 

6.X90.58 

1,334.95 

106.88 

76.00 

X0.ii7.i0 

137.60 

473.94 

681.60 

67.14 

1,340.01 
38,296.26 

7,926.00 

4,294.07 
24,120.63 
89,366.82 

1,4X5.60 
42.740.78 

X. 669.87 

761.86 

29.llb.77 

114.96 

1,349.97 
291.11 

8,906.67 



4,496.20 
286.88 

746.07 

287.76 
2, 427.30 

6,297.80 
10,624.87 
2,794.60 

857.98 
2,119.88 

161.70 
1,961.06 

179.38 
6,203.49 



2,562.64 

9,276.36 

1,094.88 
666.20 
•6.28 

2,097.28 
7.636.86 
4,668.61 
2,663.26 



2,813.88 



192.00 



21. 9X2.30 

698.62 

3,696.28 

13.027.67 

8,866.00 

307.48 

12,648.36 

490.76 

6,614.66 

93.00 



1,285.57 

1,297.18 

1,601.62 

646.96 

106.3? 

232.74 

7,867.76 

8,620.36 

1,946.68 

869.14 

816.31 

T33.48 
144.88 
914.88 

106.37 

391.39 

8,846.24 

46.68 

2,286. II 

446.68 
8,066.97 

129.16 

9X4.36 
3,8X0.38 
2,426.69 

647.94 
82.25 

108.38 

2,376.44 



108.48 

67.14 



223, 

8.871, 

68, 

562, 
3,024. 
4,974, 

488. 
2,503. 

482. 
7, 

674. 

114, 

281. 
4,666. 



7A-1* 

4,671.46 

60.00 

3.066.00 

785.00 

90.00 

6,681.00 

40.00 

11,660.00 

7,207.00 
6.300.00 
1.832.90 

2,888.00 

84.16 

60.00 

196.40 

1.819.60 

960.00 
2,676.00 



6,684.00 

2,983.19 

12,699.37 

900.00 

626.00 

76.00 

4,116.86 

137.60 

764.78 



817.80 
1.821.76 
6,829.79 
1.642.86 
6,768.67 
1,007.50 

616.00 
7,050.68 

680.00 

748.76 
6.390.00 

1,266.97 

8,493.66 



73.00 
63.62 



8.609.01 
469.27 



1,227/38 
11.17 
98.88 



284.00 



281.60 

98.00 

7.29 

6,70857 

110.00 

6,686.16 



IX719.4I 



150.00 



189.94 



31.666.34 
43,938.02 
73,678.16 
8,275.70 
2.410.69 
6,727.10 
6.96 
194,062.26 
76.046.31 
69.665.62 
4,866.21 
41,104.30 
6,897.80 
35,536.65 
2,046.33 
32,625.48 
2,299.81 
22.84 
4.128.37 
84,664.62 
1,650.64 
72,273.62 
3,899.06 
44,340.33 
2,344.52 
31,022.35 
87,598.98 
72,926.10 
22,774.65 
4,009.62 
2,189.10 
66.00 
67,030.86 

4,248.11 

2,880.79 

190.17 

638.09 

9.902.08 

220,248.90 

10,966.03 

2,147.36 

96,301.17 

96,073.60 

11,794.89 

62,955.61 

10,105.50 

512.39 

26.479.11 

2,930.19 

342.02 

3,272.55 

3,751.19 



16.997.92 
2S.0fl.C6 
36,936.56 
3,616.44 
1,250.42 
3,383.65 
2.98 
87. 031.12 
37,522.86 
34,632.61 
2,748.26 
20,552.16 
2,948.90 
17,766.82 
1.028.16 
16,455.88 
1.149.90 
11.42 
2.366.07 
42,667.26 
626.32 
36,175.26 
2,453.22 
22,170.16 
1 ,172.26 
16,611.17 
43,803.46 
36,463.06 
11,867.27 
2,004.61 
1,094.56 
32.50 
33,615.43 

2,123.05 

1.820.79 

96.09 

319.05 

4,951.04 

110,124.46 

6,476.02 

664.37 

48,161.11 

48,036.90 

6,897.45 

31.690.S8 

6,091.26 

266.20 

13,996.96 

1,466.09 

171.01 

1,636.17 

1,875.60 



2,092.85 
61.06 
373.04 

147.13 
1.213.85 

2,646.80 

6,262.43 

1,397.30 

428.96 

1,089.67 

80.85 

980.68 

69.66 

2,699.84 



951.82 

4.676.68 
647.44 

883.10 
46.12 
1.048.64 
3,771.68 
2,329.30 
1,426.63 



1,406.93 
96.00 



11,356.16 

296.76 

2,502.13 

6.524.36 

1,784.00 

178.74 

6,161.67 

206.88 

2,592.23 

46.60 



IX 



18,090.77 
22,112.12 
37,209.62 
3,616.44 
1,597.66 
4,577.20 
2.96 
99, 679.92 
42,768.08 
86.230.11 
3,177.21 
21,611.82 
3,029.75 
18,748.66 
1,112.84 
19,066.67 
1,149.90 
11.42 
2,366.07 
48,608.86 
825.32 
40.851.93 
3,000.68 
22.503.26 
1,220.36 
16,569.81 
47,676.11 
38.792.35 
12,813.90 
2,004.81 
1,094.56 
32.50 
34,922.86 

2,123.05 

1,916.79 

95.09 

319.05 

4,951.04 

121,480.60 

5,774.76 

3,066.60 

54,686.47 

49,620.90 

6,076.19 

37,762.00 

5,296.13 

266.20 

16, 589.19 

1,465.09 

217.61 

1,636.17 

1,876.60 



12 



191.32 
19.25 
179.23 



19.00 

39,010.87 
132.56 
306.87 

220.91 

699.36 



207.65 

389.74 

61.83 

186.10 

97.40 

11.629.10 

633.34 



147.00 

5.139.63 

691.64 

481.73 
28,097.72 

12,896.99 
66.56 

6.617.66 



79.26 



1*6.3! 
209.98 



6.58 
.10 

80.10 
245.00 



611.86 
67.20 



53.77 



5.50 



13 



14 



-_ 


19,042.16 


... 


6,387.00 


... 


27,330.90 


... 


9,168.23 


... 


6,560.82 


2.00 


7,267.01 


. — 


664.00 


.» 


160.406 .33 


346.40 


18.063.43 


1,732.18 


11.220.01 





8,739.98 


... 


11,363.19 


... 


476.00 


96.60 


12,047.68 


— 


809.65 


130.49 


14,094.29 


... 


616.22 


-~ 


177.00 


... 


7,931.00 


106.28 


24,120.17 


... 


710.68 


561.16 


45,611.81 





30,095.93 


... 


19,674.26 


— 


650.26 


692 .16 


17,702.21 


... 


32,866.50 


411.46 


42,279.74 


176.90 


5,626.96 


412.70 


2,324.90 


... 


360.62 


« 


329.00 


806.86 


20,930.76 


... 


137.50 


.— 


19,216.76 


... 


36,821.64 





66.00 


... 


1,360.90 


161.78 


8,940.98 


39.00 


90,389.48 


23.87 


4,125.27 


... 


17,716.19 


777.21 


30,150.84 


... 


127,927.66 


... 


2,666.69 


1,053.49 


50,618.64 


... 


9,707.90 


... 


355.87 


... 


37,359.48 


... 


2,114.95 


... 


390.02 


... 


2,012.93 


71.06 


8,400.76 



pittaflald t 1>, 14. So, 4a, II, III lb, 

lo, 5, V 1*. lb, t 
Plymouth IS b. III S 
ProvlnoaUan III lb 
IJulnoy I 1*. 4», III *»T I 
Randolph III lb, S 
Rookport III S 

Sal— I U, Id, 4a, II, III la, S 
Soituata III lb 

Shalbuma I Id, III lb, S, IV lb, S 
Soaoraat HI S 

Soa.arrllla I la. Id, II, III lb, lo, S 
Southbridga I 1*. Id, Sa, 4a, II, III lb.S 
SarlnEflald I U, lb. Id, Sb, So, 4a, 

II, III lo, S, V la, i 
gtoofcbrlof-.o IT lb 

Taunton I Id, Sb, 4a, II, III lo, S 
Taaploton IT lb, S 
Ilibury I la 
Towniand III lb 

Walthaa I la, lb, Sa, So, III S 
Vabstar I Id, II lb, S 
lUllflaat III lb 
Halt Brldf«waU.- Ill lb 
It.itfiald I la, IT lb 
naatport I Id, III lb, IT lb 
Mat Sprlmfl-ld IV lb, S 
(ayuuth I la. III lb 
llllllaintown IT lb 
Rlnohendon III lb, S 
Woroaatar I la, lb, Sb, So, 4a, II, 
III la, S, IT lb, T la, 2 

Colt to plaoaa paying tuition In, but 
not aalntalnlng thla typo of work 



Total • All Sohoola 

Tuition Paid for !on-H«lldonta 

Btata Offloo Adalniatration 

Transportation 

Coanonmalth of Maaaaohuaatta 

OBAKD TOTAL - Stata and I'unlolpalltlM 



8S.1S1.14 
1,189.00 
1,088.»4 

Sl.484.S7 

4.10S.6S 

905.69 

40.0S8.09 
3.565.92 

16,746.«6 
1, 653.60 

SS.S62.3S 

6S.64S.09 

284,078.42 
2.911.59 

26,876.22 
S.619.0T 
2.868.68 
1.806.14 

75,687.61 
6,672.97 
1,043.90 
1,610.89 

46,224.U 
8,080.74 
6.174.66 

63.422.4S 
3,893.18 
2,411.86 

646,361.76 



8,264,914.98 
842,280.97 
48,332.12 

29,861.31 

29,841.84 

6,709,931.18 



8 

679.23 

239.29 

SS0.91 
240.00 

163.90 
8.321.08 

1.849.66 



264.16 
240.00 



816.60 



67,077.16 



67,077.16 



4 

610.68 

679.31 
16.19 

247.98 

783.21 

680.84 
1,090.67 

846.67 

1.117.10 
146.69 

4,645.69 

6.00 

638.60 

1,036.91 
4,144.27 



76,963.76 



76,953.76 



8S.941.1S 

1,169.00 

1,098.94 
60,676.77 

4,098.44 

906.59 

39,429.25 

3,666.91 
14,722.44 

1,888.80 
81.771 .41 
62.688.6* 

280,111.67 
2.911.59 
26,759.12 
5, 478. 88 

2,866.88 

1,806.14 

89.461 .87 

6,672.97 

1,038.90 

1,640.89 

45,688.91 

8,078.81 

5,174.86 

84.128.86 

3.663.13 



840,861.89 



6,120,664.01 



5,120,884.01 



88,944.18 

1,189.00 

1.098.94 

61,262:60 

4,088.46 

906.69 
89,842.70 

S.686.92 
14,722.44 

1,668.80 
SS.S07.4S 
62.610.18 

180,258.07 
2.911.88 

18,769.11 
3.473.3* 
2,868.66 
1,806.14 

70.6S8.17 
8,672.97 
1,038.90 
1.640.89 

45,684.29 
8,076.31 
5,174.66 

64,286.76 
3.66S.IS 
2.411. 6* 

540,895.2* 



6,463,164.98 



6.463,164.99 



21,411.96 

1.168.00 

891.16 

14,895.40 

680.8* 

50.39 

12,857.61 

144.** 

6,360.1* 

78.6* 

10,579.8* 

9.612.47 



64,361. 

•OS, 

4.9*9, 

621, 

264, 

71. 

30,019. 

•88. 

200. 

418. 

6.S13. 

1,709. 

1,096. 

10,333, 

590. 

501. 



190,480.80 



1,089,226.81 



1,069.226.81 



•,064.30 

6*8.00 
4.626.7* 



2.086.68 

4.S60.07 

21.40 

7,486.98 

4.8*0.** 

I«,8«4.3S 
866.34 
719.80 
388.00 
150.00 

6,484.11 

181.1* 



3,432.60 

353.41 

6,105.00 

226.00 



77,828.96 



345.794.04 



345,794.04 



1,816.77 

63.1* 

1,6*1.20 

220.** 

30.39 

946.17 

144.8* 

1.1*6.07 

63.19 

2.16K.M 

S, 412.87 

6,467.90 
341.39 
512.2* 
620.11 
104.51 
45.58 

1,766.62 
129.16 

60.7* 
1.055.61 
366.76 
243.85 
1,604.65 
406.41 
11S.M 

12.909.92 



176,412.70 



1,088.00 
177,500.70 



7A-1* 

11,829.21 
1,168.00 

265.00 

360.00 

20.00 

1,000.00 



40.00 
1, SYS .00 

4,146.60 

3,638.00 



16.71 

12.S17.26 

666.41 

200.00 

3b8.20 

1,591.46 

1,466.67 

1,693.40 



388.00 
,981.24 



216,226.73 



29.641.64 

246,768.67 



7* 

100.00 
7,341.72 

6,506.** 

16.00 

166.61 
8,639.98 



4,809.47 
7.20 



190.76 



70,800.94 



154,786a 



104,766.1 



70 



431.00 



3,539.10 



~ ! 



11,160.71 



11.160.71 



61,529.25 
81.00 

507 .7* 

46.780.S7 

3,508.13 

866.20 

26,671.44 

(.421.87 

8,895.88 

1,478.21 

72,391.65 

61.976.06 

228.869.40 
2,266.66 

20,819.63 
2.876.81 
2,612.07 
1,768.86 

39,442.68 

6.780.96 

83B.90 

1,221.91 

38,112.72 
6.013.21 
8,102.61 

43,789.01 
2,647.18 
1.909.69 

350,187.64 



4,005.316.04 



4,005,310.64 



81,264.08 

15.50 

853.88 

21.925.07 

1.754.06 

418.10 

13.286.71 

1,710.7* 

4,871.90 

739.11 

34.143.90 

26,486.03 

112,929.70 

1,309.92 

10,408.78 

1,745.29 

1,306.04 

666.98 

19.721.29 

2.894.98 

419.46 

610.96 

19,133.74 

3,296.04 

1,968.80 

22.094.61 

1,634.64 

954.95 

176,140.10 



2,012,775.96 



2.012,776.95 



10 



3.052.15 

269.00 
1.178.49 



1,016.34 

2,687.04 

11.10 

3,691.67 

1.416.17 

14.449.17 

482.67 

406.64 

261.28 

75.00 

3,242.11 
90.69 



1,716.00 

176.70 

1,862.60 

187.50 



173.370.64 



173,370.64 



11 



S4.296.78 

16.50 

621.16 

26.203.66 

1,754.08 

428.10 

14.SO4.06 

1.710.78 

7.658.84 

750.S1 

I9.8S8.47 

SI.9OS.S0 

U7.S7S.I7 
1,742.8* 

10,816.40 

2,006.64 

1,381.04 

866.98 

22,963.40 

2,986.67 

419.46 

610.96 

20,849.74 

3,296.04 

2,146.60 

24,947.01 

1,822.04 

954.85 

216.233.47 



2,186,146.79 



2,186,146.79 



11 
269.81 

878.77 

2,278.30 

S9S.87 

542.46 

4,629.80 
160.08 

4,211.88 

1,040.70 
1,247.68 

19,520.66 



185,896.44 



185,898.44 



1U 
174.10 
36.26 



296.59 
81.60 



4,868.61 



4,668.61 



IS 

1,169.06 

611.78 

91.88 

33.50 
1.620.11 



1.376.12 



16a. 60 



16.169.91 



13,159.91 



14 

S4.64t.61 

170.00 

274.11 

15.184.60 

2,7*2.19 

1,488.00 

16.389.64 

768.00 

16,015.11 

1,889.00 

18,891.73 

6,645.39 

69,580.44 

7,046.60 

21,664.73 

9.294.90 

3,423.06 

661.70 

77,160.09 

1.372.00 

435.60 

324.81 

16,608.66 

18,136.44 

21,826.29 

21,764.39 

9,367.06 

2,094.62 

118,766.96 



2,380,055.59 



1,160,056.59 



Spaolal dlatributlon of Fadoral Punda 

'includoa 18,517 .07 for roaldant St ta Harda and 11,206.40 for non-raaldant Btata Ward* 
* 

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TABW 80, 6 * Vital Statistics hy types of schools sad departments 
School year ending August 31, 19U6 




QBQUP I lc. 
Industrial 
Departments 

ttttUP X 14. 
General 

Depart ments 
(Boys) 

OKOUP Z 2a. 
Short Unit 
Courses 

CROUP I 3a. 

Part. tins 
Cooper a tire 

•roup i jh. 

Trade 
Preparatory 

CROUP I 30. 
Apprentice- 
ship 

GROUP X 34. 
Vocational 
Art 
Classes 



1.189.8W 



195.99* 



•2.326 



^^^"" 



















: 


1 


2 


S 


4 


6 


6 


7 


— 
8 


9 


10 


GROUP I 4*. 
Evening 
Industrial 
06*) 


7474 


1267 


3368 


5872.8 


74.9 




4124 


314 


368,463 


GROUP II. 
Continuation 
Softools 


1878 


147 


668 


662.7 


83.4 


382 


1181 


94 


90,084 


GROUP III. 1*. 
Household Arts 
Schools 


698 


96 


896 


464.6 


87.7 


91 


342 


71 


668,949 


GRJUP III. lb. 
Household Arts 

Departments 


2006 


110 


1606 


1704.1 


90.7 


291 


1254 


198 


1,778,676 


GROUP III. le. 
General Depart- 
ments (Girls) 


720 


26 


828 


428.6 


81.7 


83 


644 


86 


476,962 


GROUP III. 8 
Evening 
Practical 
Arts 


12939 


814 


• 


8778.7 


81.8 






409 


695,669 


GROUP IV. la. 
Agricultural 
Sehools 


£88 


98 


386 


464.4 


87.9 


88 


214 


68 


760,464 


group rr. ib. 

Agricultural 

Departments 

(Day) 


678 


162 


441 


497.6 


93.3 


81 


208 


69 


761,958 


GROUP 17. 3 
Agricultural 

Do pertinents 
(Evening) 


817 




- 










60 




GROUP Y. la. 
Cooperative 
Distributive 
Occupations 


186 


14 


88 


108.7 


91.9 


96 


181 


38 


169,811 


GROUP V. lb. 
Part-tiB» 
Distributive 

Occupations 


624 


168 


486 


609.1 


96.9 


est 


88 


6 


4,701 


GROUP V. 8 
Evening 
Distributive 
Occupations 


699 


139 


433 


616.1 


79.9 




188 


81 


6,197 


Grand Total 
for all types 


48.784 


6666 


16, 781 


28,714.6 


86.8 


2663 


17496 


2461 

i 


i ,286,714 



TABLE NO. 7-USE OF FEDERAL FUNDS 
SMITH-HUGHES AND GEOEGE-DEEN (VOCATIONAL) 
A. Distribution for Federal Fiscal year ending June 30, 1946 



243 



Salary Expenditure 
against which we 
match Federal 
(Smith- Hughes and 
Georp;e-Deen) Funds 



Abington 

Adams 

Agawam 

Andever 

Ai iingtcr. 

Ashfield 

Attleboro 

Avon 

Barnstable 

Belchertown 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Bourne 

Bristol County 

B ro ckton 

Cambridge 

Chicopee 

Dartmouth 

Deerfield 

Dighton 

Eastham 
Essex County 
Everett 
Fall River 
Falmouth 

Fitchburg 
Framingham 
Gloucester 
Great Barrington 
Greenfield 
Hadley 
Hanson 
Hatfield 
Haverhill 
Holliston 
Holyoke 
Hudson 

Lawrence 
Lee 

Leominster 
Lowell 
Lynn 



1,841.18 

3,582.56 

172.70 

260.00 

2,211.79 

• 7,484.51 

1,105.21 

11,434.53 

1,371.56 

6,607.45 

38,170.45 

695,768.71 

1,497.05 

21,021.47 

21,731.81 

18,288.70 

31,073.31 

4,927.66 

1,723.11 

6,562.92 

61,807.05 
47,276.44 
29,580.00 

4,286.77 
13,973.37 

1,259.03 
19,369.45 

1,881.79 
16,319.79 

1,657.72 

3,203.22 
48,060.99 

1,248.65 
43,827.02 

4,871.46 
22,795.57 

1,810.84 
14,651.65 
56,9b6.47 
30,639.36 



SMITH-HUGHES 



Salaries of Teachers, Directors, and Supervisors 



Agriculture 



260.11 
308.88 
764.06 

1,804.49 
3,218.81 

455.19 

5,868.65 

455.18 



Trade and Industrial 
and Home Economics 



292.62 



308.88 



136.76 
45.59 



748.28 

75.98 

318.68 

98.77 

287.39 

4,750.23 

60,033.83 

98.77 

1,265.57 

1,296.55 

1,801.62 

91.17 

106.37 

232.74 

1,489.10 
2,620.38 
1,945.63 
113.96 
2,515.31 

733.43 
144.35 
914.85 
106.37 

98.77 
2,548.24 

45.58 

2,285.12 

136.75 

3,085.97 

129.16 

914.36 

3,510.32 

2,425.59 



Total 



136.76 
305.70 



308.88 

748.28 

75.98 

1,082.74 

98.77 

287.39 

4,750.23 

61,838.32 

98.77 

3,218.81 

1,265.57 

1,296.55 

1,801.62 

546.36 

106.37 

232.74 



7,357.75 
2,620.38 
1,945.63 
569.14 
2,515.31 

733.43 
144.35 
914.85 
106.37 

391.39 

2,548.24 

45.58 

2,285.12 

445.63 
3,085.97 

129.16 

914.36 
3,510.32 
2,425.59 



GEORGE-DEEN 



Salaries and Travel of Teachers, Directors, and Supervisors 



Agriculture 



210.00 



5,691.00 



2,255.55 
2,418.00 



98.20 



1,291.50 



Home 
Economics 



525.00 



Trade and 
Industrial 



188.45 

573.00 
314.84 

159.00 



260.00 

150.00 

1,375.00 

1,974.00 

589.52 



84.18 

150.00 

98.20 



200.00 



1,500.00 



1,285.07 

70.00 

3,775.00 

4,698.39 

2,597.45 

17,951.61 

3,300.00 
50.00 

525.00 



40.00 
3,216.00 

8.401.00 
9,529.87 
2,927.50 

2,835.00 



4,287.50 

950.00 
1,187.50 



7,834.00 
13,162.83 



Distributive 
Occupations 



5,436.10 
1,237.02 



Total 



1,058.19 
33.00 



525.00 



1,285.07 

210.00 

70.00 

5,775.00 

188.45 

4,698.39 

3,170.45 

23,702.55 

5,850.00 
4,537.02 

50.00 

2,255.55 
785.00 
150.00 

3,793.00 
40.00 

5,190.00 

8,990.52 
9,529.87 
2,927.50 

2,835.00 

84.18 

150.00 

1S6.40 

4,267.50 

950.00 
2,679.00 



7,834.00 

2,558.19 

13,195.83 



Smith-Hughes 

and 
George-Deen 



525.00 
13b. 76 
305.70 

1,285.07 

518.88 

818.28 

75.98 

4,857.74 

287.22 

4,985.78 

7,920.68 

85,540.87 

98.77 

9,068.81 

5,802.59 

1,296.55 

1,851.62 

546.36 

2,361.92 

1,017.74 

150.00 

11,150.75 

2,660.38 

7,135.63 

569.14 

11,505.83 

9,529.87 

3,660.93 

144.35 

3,749.85 

190.55 

150.00 

587.79 

6,835.74 

45.58 

3,235.12 

3,124.63 

3,085.97 

129.16 

8,748.36 

6,068.51 

15,621.42 



244 



Mai den 

Marlboro 
Marshfield 
Medfield 
Medford 
Melrose 
Methuen 
Middleboro 
Milford 
Milton 
Nantucket 
New Bedford 
Newburyport 
New Salem 
Newton 

Norfolk County- 
North Adams 
Northampton 
No rthb ridge 
Norton 
Norwood 
Oak Bluffs 
Orange 
Palmer 
Peabody 
Pitts field 
Plymouth 
Provincetown 
Quincy 
Randolph 
Rockport 
Salem 
Scituate 
Shelburne 
Somerset 
Somerville 
Southb ridge 
Springfield 
St ockb ridge 
Taunton 
Tempi eton 
Tisbury 
Towns end 
Waltham 
Webster 
Wellfleet 
West Bridgewater 
Westfield 



Salary Expenditure 
against which we 
match Federal 
(Smith-Hughes and 
,George-Deen) Funds 



15,879.10 

1,526.99 

1,459.65 

25.00 

46,466.57 

3,240.54 

2,895.16 

171.08 

522.00 

5,698.33 

158,646.63 

2,873.08 

4,993.40 

68,720.18 

39,263.15 

5,196.93 

41,908.60 

5,938.30 

378.46 

14,119.44 

1,908.17 

18.31 

2,290.32 

490.00 

51,280.29 

761.74 

37,692.44 

3,024.13 

725.46 

20,883.57 

2,180.21 

10,287.98 

990.92 

49,884.28 

40,206.27 

138,932.92 

2,322.66 

7,227.81 

2,865.88 

1,736.77 

711.08 

31,076.21 

4,052.95 

599.92 

1,469.46 

21,429.93 



SMITH-HUGHES 



Salaries of Teachers, Directors and Supervisors 



Agriculture 



406.42 



471.44 

4,974.53 

666.52 



Trade and Industrial 
and Home Economics 



845.34 



341 . 39 
520.21 



647.94 

52.25 

106.36 

2,378.44 

189.94 

67.14 

223.73 

8,871.72 

68.38 

91.17 

3,024.49 

433.12 
1,836.71 
462.07 
7.60 
674.06 
114.96 

281.11 
4,666.67 
1,815.77 

53.18 

1,651.20 

220.33 

30.39 

945.17 

144.35 

289.73 

53.18 

2,162.39 

2,412.87 

6,457.90 

512.26 

104.51 

45.58 

1,755.52 

129.15 

60.78 
1,055.51 



Total 



647.94 

52.25 

106.36 

2,378.44 

189.94 

406.42 

67.14 

223.73 

8,871.72 

68.38 

562.61 
3,024.49 
4,974.53 

433.12 
2,503.23 

462.07 
7.60 

674.06 

114.96 

28.. 11 
4,666.67 
1,815.77 

53.18 

1,651.20 

220.33 

30.39 

945.17 

144.35 

1,135.07 

53.18 

2,162.39 

2,412.87 

6,457.90 

341.39 

512.26 

520.21 

104.51 

45.58 

1,755.52 

129.15 

60.78 
1,055.51 



GEORGE-DEEN 



Salaries and Travel of Teachers, Directors and Superviso 



rs 



Agriculture 



2,820.00 



Home 
Economics 



691.46 



230.00 
137.50 



— 


400.00 


417.50 


— 


685.37 


621.75 


— 


512.50 


2,095.18 


142.86 


50.00 


— . 





1,985.00 


4,583.17 


285.00 





— 




... 


930.00 





4,547.00 


2,463.53 





480.00 


70.00 





343.75 







1,690.00 


4,700.00 





1,256.97 


3,561.33 


M«M 


1,376.00 


10,112.50 




240.00 


918.00 


— —— 


-._ 


205.00 


— — 


360.00 


— - 


... 


1,000.00 






Trade and 
Industrial 



25.00 
100.00 



25.00 



40.00 



Distributive 
Occupations 



-.- 


1,375.00 


2,100.00 





___ 


_-- 


1,000.00 


1,490.00 





— • 


... 


__- 


25.71 





1,287.50 


12,237.46 


387.48 




200.00 


_— 


358.20 










25.00 



1,650.01 



29.00 



1,220.37 
50.00 



1,097.50 



Total 



25.00 
125.00 

230.00 

1,675.01 

137.50 

2,820.00 
29.00 

817.50 

1,307.12 

2,607.68 

192.86 

6,568.17 

285.00 

930.00 

7,010.53 

550.00 

343.75 

6,390.00 

4,818.20 



12,708.87 
1,158.00 

255.00 
360.00 

1,000.00 



40.00 
1,375.00 
3,197.50 

2,490.00 



25.71 
13,524.96 
387.48 
200.00 
358.20 
691.46 



Smith-Hughes 

and 
George-Deen 



672.94 
177.25 
106.36 
230.00 

4,053.45 
137.50 
189.94 

3,226.42 
96.14 

1,041.23 

10,178.84 

2,676.06 

755.47 
9,592.66 
5,259.53 
1,363.12 
9,513.76 
1,012.07 

351.35 
7,064.06 

114.96 
4,818.30 

281.11 

4,666.67 

14,524.64 

1,158.00 

53.18 

1,906.20 

580.33 

30.39 

1,945.17 

144.35 
1,135.07 
53.18 
2,202.39 
3,787.87 
9,655.40 

341.39 
3,002.26 

520.21 

104.51 

71.29 

15,280.48 

516.63 

200.00 

418.98 
1,746.97 



245 



Salary Expenditure 
against which we 
match Federal 
(Smith-Hughes and 

flanrge-nftfin) PnnriR 



Westport 

West Springfield 

Weymouth 

Williams town 

Winchendon 

Worcester 



Mr. Allen 



Massachusetts Depai t* 
ment of Education 
Salaries and Travel 
of Supervisors 



3,612.81 
3,051.90 
27,693.85 
2,522.84 
1,643.84 
224,595.56 



SMTTH-HUGHES 



Salaries of Teachers, Directors and Supervisors 



Agriculture 



227.59 
243.85 

406.42 

1,121.71 



Trade and Industrial 
anH Hoinfl Koonomics 



129.16 

1,604.55 

113.96 
11,788.21 

2,088.00 



Total 



356.75 
243.85 
1,604.55 
406.42 
113.96 
12, 909. £2 



2,088.00 



GEOTtGE-DRRW 



Salaries and Travel of Teachers, Directors and Supervisors 



Agriculture 



3,367.41 



75.00 



654.02 



Home 
Economi cs 



338.00 
630.00 



Trade and 
InflufitriUI. 



1,466.67 
200.00 

5,000.00 



844.32 19,093.04 , 



Distributive 
Occupations 



1,047.91 



2,672.46 



Total 



1,466.67 

3,367.41 

200.00 

388.00 
6,752.91 



23,263.84 



Smith-Hughe 8 
and 

rTftnrge-r.ooy 



1,823.42 

3,611.26 

1,804.55 

406.42 

501.96 

19,662.83 



2,088.00 



23,263.84 



Totals 



2,420,446.39 



23,962.29 



156,973.05 



180,935.34 



20,000.00 



30,656.49 



160,353.85 



15,556.56 



226,566.90 



407,502.24 



B-l Expenditures for teacher-training ( Smith-Hughes) 
(Federal fiscal year ending June 30, I9U6) 



246 1 



Expenditures 



Federal 



State 



Agriculture 

Hcm Economies 

Trade and Industry, 



Total expended (Federal 

tad State money) $69.6*K).7l. 



Bxpended for Equipment. 



Ixpeaded for maintenance 
(Shared equally. Federal 
and State) $66,756.65.., 



$ 6,727.76 
11,678,08 



•3 



15^222^ 

3^,378.33 



$3^.378.33 



* 6.769.76 
11,890.70 
16,601.92 

$35.2^2.38 



88U.06 



*3*. 378. 32 



Federal funds: 



Available. 
Used 



Balance 

^ranef erred to Oeorge-Deen for matching 



*32.870.6U 
-$ 1,507.69 



247 



B-2 Pxpenditurea for teaoher-training (George-Deen) 
(Federal **iscal year ending June SO, 1948) 

xpenditures 

Federal -----«-■-------------- 

(Oeorge-Deen) State Looal 

rilWI^WWi I I 111.11 .^^MWW^- i I " " "" N«— *"WPW»WIW»— W l ■■ W Mill — !■ I I I WW I H W»—— —Wlll^l H ilWMWWM<—««^PWI»N—i III II Ml » 1 ■ W lpl ■>«■»«»«— W— «« 

Agricultural • • ••••••• 

Itate of iassaohusetts ••••••••••• 

(TraTel of Supervisors 

and maintenance of -upervis ion* ..*••••• tS,S32.39 ,632.39 $ - 

Bristol County •••.•••••• 766*67 - 766. 67^ 

Essex County ••••..•••.•••.••••• 983*00 - 8.00 1 

fcrfolk County......... ••••,••... 737.50 - 7S7.50 3 

lest Springfield... 250.00 - 250.00 3 

■ I i n . i.i w m i i i n m m i n - ID" I I I ill 

Total $6,274.56 ,632.39 12.742.17 

subject to ^tate reimburse ent to be mad© during the following fisoal year. 






B-2 rxpe ditures for teacher-training (Ocorge-Deen) Continued 

Fxpenditures 

Federal 
(George-I^en) ?tate 

Home Foonoaios, . ••••••••.••.•••.••••... 

State of Massachusetts. ...... • • 

(Trarel of "upervisors 

and ,'aintenanoe of Supervision) I 4,656.93 | 4,686.93 

Essex County 800.00 

New Bedford 700.00 

Northampton 440.00 - 

Total $6,576.93 I 4,636.93 

-ubjeot to Ptate reimbursement to be Made during th«> 'ollowinr ^isoal year. 



Loeml 



- 



800.00 



700. 00 J 



400.00' 



#1,940.00 



<-~ 






B-2 cxpe dituras for taaoher-tra inlnp (Georr«~D«en7 oontinuad 











Fxpenditurea 








- '>deral 
(Georga-Daen) 




bate 




Looal 










.10,71^.10 
26.00 
25.00 
.00 
25.00 
26.00 
26.00 

360.00 
26.00 
' .00 
25.00 
26.00 
26100 
26.00 

160.00 
26.00 

200.00 


1 


812. 

— 

• 
— 

— 
— 


43 


1 - 

2,400, 
1,000, 
2,500, 
6,000, 
4,000, 
2,500, 
3,0 '0, 
2,000, 
3,600, 
6,000, 
3,000, 
2,600. 
2,000, 
1,600, 
2,600, 
. ,000, 
146,600, 




Ptata of ^asaaohufotta 








("alary and travel of 
looal ^ireotora, and 


^uponriaori 
aintenanoe 


and 
of 










oo 2 








,00 2 








,00 








,oo 2 








,oo 2 








,oo 2 








2 

,00 








, -) 2 








,oo 2 








.oo 2 








.■>v 








.oo 2 








,00 2 








►oo 2 








►or 








►oo 2 




Total 
Grand 


Total 


111,737.10 
|24,688.P9 


• s 


812. 
,931. 


43 

76 


► 00 

,17 



25 



Trade «nd Industry - continued 



federal i^undat 
Available*. 
Used.,,... 



federal 

( fleorRe-Peen) 



Ttate 



Local 



Balance 



$30,128,84 

24,533.59 
$ S, 540.26 



2 PireB»n training 






I 

3 



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8 

1 

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Ml •-» I 

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CM I N 



* I Ok I 



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5 s 88 



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Table Be. 

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S tat i« tics of Teacher-Training fron Juljr I, 1946 to 
of Teacher* in State-aided Senools and Chanfee in 
All School* (Mn and %m) 



SO, 194T - Concluded 
of Teaehlag Tar— 



t pb m 



I. tmosnuL 



1. Pay 

a. Boys (Unit Trade) 



b. Glrle (Unit Trado) 

c. Xnduetrial Depte. 

d. c< 



S 

is 

I: 
II 



•hop Aon- 



it* 



Aca- 



387* 


6*1 
441 



14T 1 

20 1 

12 



2. Short Unita 

a. Boya 
2. Part-tins 

a. Co-operative 
1. angular Trado 



4. 



2.Dnit 
b. Trado Preparator 
e. Apprentice* lp 



II. C0STI2UATIOH 1. Boya 

2. Girla 
XII. BQDS2H0ID ARTS 1. Day 

a. sohoola 



rv. 



7. DI8TRIBUTI7B 

OCCUPATION 



b. High Sohooi Depte. 

o. General Depte. 
2. Evening 
1. Pay 

a. sohoola 

b. High Sohooi Depte. 

1. Part-tiiee 

a - Co-o.orr.tivo 

b. Part-Uaa 
2. 



Iflt 1 94 1 



22* 

i?* 

2B2 1 
27l 
22 1 

150 1 

49 1 
S7T 1 

35l 

37I 

24l 

23l 



23 

3l 



4l 
2fil 

3 1 
27J 

69 1 

MJ 

16 1 
14 1 



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1 
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3 



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1 



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8l 



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Aca- 



6 



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ii* 



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2 



2 
1 



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2 



36T 1 
3 

8f» 
431 



130* 
Wl 
26l 
12 



10»1 93l 



to 

e o » 3 

e* e e -4 



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,Cti- 



10 



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1 

12 

• 



11 



27 J 
14 

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23 1 
13l 
49l 
& 

2991 
36l 

9 

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491 

3901 

31* 

67l 
S2 1 

38l 
24l 
3*1 



Si 

ll 

4l 
24l 

IS 1 

271 



331 

161 

15l 
4l 



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1441 

10l 
14 

& 

13 

1181 

1 
231 
7l 

8 
10l 
27l 



-r 

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Aea- 



12 



113* 

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7 

13 



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48* 

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111 
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18 



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Si 

1681 

3S4l 
3fl 

20 l 

43l 

13? 

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394I 

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sol 

341 
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20I 

28l 
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34* 

18l 

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7 

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27 
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1461 
111 
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18 

1201 

3 
23I 

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16 



119* 

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8 



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